How to add wireless configuration support to SCCM

first_imgSCCM allows the right click menu items in the SCCM console to be customized.  We utilized this capability to demonstrate how configuration of custom AMT support could be added to SCCM.  Since SCCM SP1 does not support wireless AMT configuration, we added some basic support for this to the SCCM menu system. The attached zip contains files that show how to add right click menu items to Altiris, how to make wireless configuration scripts and how to use both of these capabilities to embed wireless AMT configuration support directly into SCCM. This package is intended as a demonstration only. This package contains the following components:1.             Genscript: This utility creates a VB script that pushes wireless profiles, certificates and AMT configuration data to an arbitrary client.  The Genscript utility and user guide are included in this package. The latest version can be found here: http://software.intel.com/en-us/articles/intel-ws-management-translator/.2.             XML files: For the demonstration, there are two XMLs needed: vpro_client.xml and vpro_colleciton.xml.  One pushes settings to an entire collection and the other pushes settings to a single member. The single member XML file calls push.vbs directly.  The collection XML calls gp_exe.vbs which calls push.vbs on all the collection members.3.             Wireless configuration script generated by Genscript: This script is executed with the client’s hostname and domain name as command line arguments.  It conducts certificate requests, configures the client with those certificates and configures a wireless AMT profile.  For details on Genscript and how to use it to generate wireless configuration scripts refer.4.             Push.vbs: This script takes a hostname as a command line argument and calls a wireless configuration script. The name of this script is hard coded in push.vbs along with the domain suffix to use.  For simplicity I hard coded which wireless configuration script to use. By default, this script is hard coded as vpro_config_update.vbs.5.             Gp_exe.vbs: This script calls push.vbs for all the members of a particular collection. It is based on the sms_ping.vbs script.  It takes the target collection as a command line argument and then calls push.vbs for each hostname.6.             Add_to_Collection.vbs – This script adds a client instance to a particular collection.  It is used to populate a ‘Push Failed’ collection with client instances for clients that fail a wireless settings push. The collection ID for the destination collection is hard coded in the script.7.             Delete from Collection.vbs – This script removes client instances from a particular collection. It is used to remove client instances from the ‘Push Failed’ collection when a wireless settings push succeeds for that client.8.             Clear_collection.vbs – This script clears the contents of a given collection.  It is useful for clearing the ‘Push Failed’ collection.last_img read more

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Insights from the INSIGHT CIO Forum

first_imgLast week I had the opportunity to attend the CIO Forum held in conjunction with the Insight 2009 Annual Conference in Orlando, FL.  While being held adjacent to Disney’s theme park, the theme of this event was appropriately titled “Vision Voice Value”. I spent two days discussing best practices, sharing lessons learned from Intel IT and comparing notes and strategies with leading CIOs, IT Directors, Managers and Administrators in the Health Care profession.  Our focus? ways to deliver and articulate the business value of IT. I had the opportunity to: participate in a roundtable discussion of ~15 Health Care CIOs titled “The value of IT in improving financial performance” present to 50-60 CIOs on the business value of server refresh present to 20-30 IT Directors and Administrators on using the Xeon ROI tool as a way to justify server investment To enable this transformation from cost center to value center, we concluded that the accountability remains with IT, as IT professionals and CIOs must individually and collectively demonstrate business value through our investments and establish are relationship of IT predictability, trust and credibility with our business partners.   These are core themes I have seen very visibly inside Intel IT as I began my journey to the center of IT a few short months ago. My second observation from this event reinforces some personal experiences I have had working with many other IT professionals in the past several months.  With the global recession and it’s impacts to capital funding, the need to justify IT investment is greater than ever – and the competition internally for capital $ is very high.  We may never go back to the way it was.  We have seen this inside Intel IT’ organization as well and as a result, created at server refresh savings estimator tool to share what we learned in justifying our investment a proactive server refresh strategy in 2007 and staying committed to that investment in 2009. Thanks, ChrisIf you like this, follow me on twitter I demonstrated the server refresh savings estimator tool at the event to both the CIOs and IT Directors / Administrators and the feedback was very positive (“session was well worth my time”).   Prior to the event, I also had the opportunity to work with Deborah Gash (CIO for Saint Luke’s Health Services) and her staff.  Debe provided a glowing endorsement of the tool (Thanks Debe !!) after demonstrating the business value from a project already completed and the in intent to use it for several future projects. I invite you to learn more about why we created this tool and how to use it.  If you have a question or want to give us feedback on how to enhance it – just let me know with a comment on this blog. My final thought comes from a blog written by Don Sears at eweek.  Don discusses about the need for IT to be right, accurate, credible and trustworthy is so important whether you are working inside IT or with IT.  Credibility and Trust is something that is hard to gain and easy to lose … so it is easy to understand why being right is key to working with IT.  Getting it wrong can have huge consequences. One of the most thought provoking questions at the CIO roundtable that has stuck with me is … “How does your CEO (or your business customers) view IT?”  … as a cost center (necessary evil) or as a value center (strategic enabler).  While no one directly answered this rhetorical question, it was clear that our collective mission is to migrate IT from cost center to value center.  This migration will not be immediate.  It happens over time. Join us at IT@Intel and share your insights on our shared journey to transform IT from a cost center to a value center for business.  I look forward to hearing from you. last_img read more

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Data Center Power Management for 2012

first_imgTo put these capabilities in practice in your data center environment, you can adopt one of the solutions described under Policy-Based Power Management in the Intel® Cloud Builder library.I would love to hear from you if you have a specific usage case that is not covered.Best Regards! Although energy costs are the fastest-rising cost element in the data center, the power battle hasn’t been lost. There are still many opportunities to improve efficiency. These include cooling optimization using hot and cold aisles, increasing rack density, turning on/off machines on demand, and balancing load in the data center to optimize cooling and reduce power consumption.All these opportunities can potentially be achieved with Intel® Intelligent Power Node Manager, a technology embedded into Intel chips in a select group of servers. Some of most common scenarios where Intel Intelligent Power Node Manager can be applied beyond monitoring include: The Static Power Capping usage model employs more aggressive capping.  There will be some performance impact during peak, but this should be OK as long as the service level agreement (SLA) is met.  The effect is to increase infrastructure utilization.Usage model No. 4 (Dynamic Power Capping) implements continuous capping for additional power savings.  The capping level is determined by the application performance monitor driving a power management policy.  This scheme may not be practical if the performance monitoring facility is not available.For instance, in virtualized environments, where hosts run a variety of applications, it is difficult to isolate a meaningful indicator representing the application mix. For want of a better indicator, monitoring CPU utilization has been surprisingly useful in some settings. The idea is to impose a cap on a server based on the current CPU utilization in that server. The actual capping level, in watts, is derived heuristically from offline experiments with representative workload mixes, yielding energy savings of 10 to 15 percent over a daily workload cycle.In usage model No. 5 (Hybrid Usages), the practical capping range is limited to about 30 percent of peak power in light configurations. If the goal is energy saving, non-operating states, such as hibernation, must be added to Intel Intelligent Power Node Manager policies.  This is possible in virtualized cloud environments that allow dynamic consolidation of workloads into a pool of active machines and the shutting down of unused machines.What’s new with Intel Intelligent Power Node Manager 2.0The following table compares the features in each version of Intel Intelligent Power Node Manager.center_img Increasing compute density—enforcing power limits based on power reported and populating racks with more servers using the previously stranded power capacity in the rackLinking cooling to actual demand—coordinating Intel Intelligent Power Node Manager power and thermal data with data center cooling controls to help ensure that adequate, but not excessive, cooling is provided, minimizing cooling costsDynamically balancing resources—using migrations tools to move workloads to racks with available power headroom, and using Intel Intelligent Power Node Manager’s power capping to help ensure the rack budget is not exceededIn addition to these optimization scenarios, Intel Intelligent Power Node Manager can be applied to increase availability, applying power capping in case of power outage and reducing the overall consumption with some performance penalty.With the launch of the Intel® Xeon® E5 processor, the second generation of Intel Intelligent Power Node Manager (aka. 2.0) has been released. It is designed to improve monitoring and control granularity and to allow implementation of a range of usage models, as depicted here:These scenarios go from simple real-time power monitoring to integrated data center power management practices. Expected higher payoffs for power management require higher investment and process maturity to deploy.You don’t necessarily have to step up to the top, or even one of the more advanced usage models. Some situations could be enough for usage model No. 1, Real Time Server Power Monitoring. There may be no reason to invest beyond this point.In usage model No. 2 (Power Guard Rail) and No. 3 (Static Power Capping), Intel Intelligent Power Node Manager allows you to pack servers more densely in a rack by imposing a guaranteed power limit.Consider this scenario: In a traditional method, we usually take the specification of the power supply rating from the server manufacture, e.g. 650W, and test in a lab the real power consumption using a power meter. We then discover that 400W is reasonable to be used. In a typical 4KW power envelope, we usually populate the rack with 10 servers (i.e. 4.000W/400W = 10). Using Intel Intelligent Power Node Manager in the same server, measurements indicate that for a defined workload, the power consumption rarely exceeds 250W. Using that as an aggressive power/server budget, and enforcing 4KW for a global cap, i.e. the entire rack, only on rare situations could the consumption exceed the 4KW envelope, and will not exceed that amount due to Intel Intelligent Power Node Manager policy. In this scenario, we can then populate a rack with 16 servers instead of 10 (i.e. 4.000W/250W = 16), for an increase of 60 percent in rack density.last_img read more

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Are you feeling SaaSy?

first_imgSaaS (Software-as-a-Service) and all the other aaS’s seem to have exploded in the last couple of years. In my previous post, The CIO is Dead! Long Live the CIO, I briefly touched on the confluence of changes impacting the CIO and the IT Department. One of those trends is SaaS. Do you have SaaS applications in your environment? Have you embraced the changes SaaS brings? Exactly what are the changes SaaS brings? First, let’s define SaaS. Gartner defines it as: as software that is owned, delivered and managed remotely by one or more providers. The provider delivers software based on one set of common code and data definitions that is consumed in a one-to-many model by all contracted customers at anytime on a pay-for-use basis or as a subscription based on use metrics. I think that states it very well. In short, it is multi-tenant software, that is usually billed on a PUPM basis, per-user-per-month.What is not  SaaS is traditional on-premise software that is now provided in a hosted in environment and billed on the PUPM basis. We were recently involved in a software selection process and had narrowed down the applications to three finalists. In the final presentations, I asked about their SaaS offering. “Oh yes, we have a SaaS, in fact, we offer on-prem, hosted and SaaS.” So I asked them to explain the difference, is it a single code base, is it multi-tenant? What it boiled down to was a piece of paper. The only difference in the three offerings was the contract and how much they charged for the usage. In fact, they charged more for their “SaaS” offering than their hosted version, even though they were identical offerings. Sounds like “cloud-washing” to me.The SaaS model brings about many changes, but I would like to focus on just a few: the risk (contract), the financial, and the support. In the various SaaS contracts I have negotiated, I have found some common “issues” to be addressed. Some of these are common to contracts for other delivery methods but are accentuated in a SaaS model. Service Levels – It almost never fails, the first pass of the contract is either silent on SLAs, sometimes to the extent that the provider never has to make the application available, yet you still have to pay, or there is some wording like “we will deliver the application in accordance with the documentation” or they link to some website that defines the SLAs with no version control. In either case, they can be changed at any time without notification. All SLAs must defined and incorporated explicitly in the agreement. Payment and Disputes – This is another common issue, the provider reserves the right to revoke access to the system for non-payment period. You never want to get in a position where the provider can legally hold your data and therefore your business hostage. We like to negotiate in “good faith dispute” language that prevents them from revoking access if we have a dispute. We will include arbitration language to help settle the dispute after a specified time period (typically 120 days or more) of trying to otherwise resolve the dispute. Data – Be careful with this one. Be sure the agreement spells out who owns the data (YOU do), who can use the data (ONLY you), who is responsible for backups, disaster recovery and providing copies of the data (you should always have access to make copies of your data, and they should make backups and have a solid DR plan). Access to the data gets tricky at termination of the agreement as well, or in the event the firm goes under. Be sure to get language in the agreement that spells out how you will get your data in these instances and specifies destruction of the data at termination. Before moving on, another aspect of this that has bitten us, be sure you have language in the agreement that gives you immediate termination rights (and access to your data) in the event the provider gets purchased, especially if they get purchased by a competitor to your firm (yes this DID happen to us). Liability, warranties, and indemnification –  Almost all providers that I have dealt with want to absolve themselves of any liability if they get breached and your data gets stolen. Read this language carefully and try to get the firm to assume the risk if they do not adequately protect your data. If they are not willing…walk away. The financial impacts of the SaaS model can be difficult to maneuver. By using a subscription based service you are essentially moving costs from a Capital Item to an Operating Expense. As you go down this path, be sure your CFO and your Board understand this and are comfortable with the change. Some vendors are trying to resolve this through “cloud credits” and other types of agreements. I think the jury is still out whether those will help with this or not.Another aspect of financial impacts could have actually been placed in the contract section as well. Because the SaaS model is typically a subscription based agreement based on some unit of measure (typically users, or employees) one of the advantages of this model is scalability. You, in theory, are only paying for what you use. Be wary, however, that most agreements allow you to scale up, but severely limit your ability to scale down, if they allow it all.The final area we will explore in this post is support of SaaS-based applications. It is probably obvious, but using SaaS applications moves most of the support from your internal IT resources to the vendor. Your team will be limited in the amount of support they can provide. This is a change management effort not only with your end-users, but also with your staff. Your end-users will have to understand the limitations and be satisfied with the service levels negotiated and the amount of flexibility they have in the application. Your end-users should have a seat at the table in the selection and negotiation, so the fully understand the implications of using this delivery model. As much as possible, the support should align with your current support model. For example, if you provide support 24×7, does the vendor provide the same hours of support? Can anyone call support, or does it have to go through named support leads? In our case, our Tier I support is outsourced, so we have to be sure a 3rd party can initiate a support request on our behalf. Do you, Mr. or Ms. CIO have direct access to a senior level person that you can reach out to in an emergency?As with many of the changes in IT, the SaaS model may also threaten your team. This may include your support team who is losing some element of control, but also your systems team who no longer maintains the servers for the application. Again, change management is key. Communicate, communicate, communicate the reason for adopting a SaaS approach to some of your application, reassure them of their role, and let them know, while their responsibilities may be different there may be opportunity to expand their role.These are just a few of the many changes and impacts the introduction of the SaaS delivery model can have on IT. I would love to hear about some of the impacts you have seen or some of your thoughts on those I have shared. In the next post, we will explore how adopting this model impacts the relationship of the CIO to the rest of the business.If anything you read here or in other posts strikes a chord, I would love to hear from you. Leave a comment Jeffrey Ton is the SVP of Corporate Connectivity and Chief Information Officer for Goodwill Industries, providing vision and leadership in the continued development and implementation of the enterprise-wide information technology portfolio, including applications, infrastructure, security and telecommunications.Find him on LinkedInOpens in a new window.Follow him on TwitterOpens in a new window (@jtongici)Add him to your circles on Google+Opens in a new windowCheck out his previous posts and discussionslast_img read more

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All Change for Windows Server Users

first_imgIntel at CeBIT – Windows Server 2003: End of SupportThe end of life of Windows Server 2003 presents security and software issues for enterprises that stay on the platform. But there are opportunities for those who adopt the latest hardware and software platforms, including green IT and greater processing power. This video was original published on http://www.computerworlduk.com/sponsored-article/it-business/3608608/intel-at-cebit–windows-server-2003-end-of-support/last_img

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Making A Winner: 7 Traits of Successful Partners

first_imgLast week was an amazing week. We watched 25 as Intel partners were honored for their outstanding achievements, innovation and excellence.As I celebrated the partners and projects that won awards (including many of my customers), I started to notice a few common themes coming up again and again as the presenters highlighted the reasons these companies were selected by the judges to win this year’s award.Innovation is a given, but I noticed that companies winning awards last night had taken steps to adapt to a selling environment that has shifted. They realized that our customers are looking for partners who are more technical and solution centric and have been proactive in making the shift to their business model to accommodate our customers’ changing needs.While the memories are fresh, I wanted to share a few more of the themes I saw emerging from last night’s award winners.1. It doesn’t happen overnight: If we look at the achievements of the partners crossing the stage last night, you have to look back 24 to 36 months to see where it all started. They made the decision to invest in adapting their selling model, their training model and their hiring process to become more technical and more solution focused. That foresight and action to make the shift positioned them for success today.2. Prioritizing Upskilling: The partners that are outpacing the competition and winning more business have ramped up their investment in training to equip their staff with the skills needed to succeed in a solution selling environment. The guys who are holding on to a legacy business model and selling approaches aren’t not keeping up with the market and are falling behind. (And, I’ve said before we need to futureproof our skills to remain relevant).3. Solutions not Silos: The days of sending customers to different people for sales, marketing, and technical input are over. Account teams need a perfect blend of sales, technical expertise, solution enablement and marketing. It’s a bit of a holy grail but important to customers who are looking for a business partners and trusted advisor. They don’t want to navigate our internal structures to get their solution online.4. New Players = New Partners: With AI, IoT, advanced analytics and other new technologies coming to bear, new players are arriving on the scene (with cool logos and even cooler names). They have a very important role to play the ecosystem of tomorrow and leading partners know who they are, what their skills are and how to bring together the right people to the table so we can deliver the solutions our customers need.5. Old Tech & New Tech: Partners have to straddle two distinct worlds – you need one foot in old tech and one foot in new tech so you can help your customers make their own transitions effectively. Being able to blend the old and the new to deliver a cohesive strategy for partners is a recipe for success.6. Focus on Flexibility. The customer experience is personal, and sometimes that means throwing out the rulebook. It might mean adapting a tried and true program because you know a different approach will get you to the result you want. Start at the finish line with what you’re trying to achieve and work your way back to the tactics – you might find being flexible on the approach could yield the best results.7. They’ve done the hard work: Transitioning a business model to respond to new market conditions (and the solution selling model) is super tough. I think we need to recognize and acknowledge how hard it really is, but the companies who do the hard work will come out on top.An Award-Winning FutureCompanies with the foresight to invest in training and refining their business models towards a future-facing, solution-centric selling strategy are winning more than they are losing. We must give credit to the executive leadership and the sales leadership of these companies for making the investment to transform their business.Taking a page from our Partner of the Year winners, doing the hard work will pay off – not only with bragging rights now that you’ve won, but with bottom line results, increased sales, tighter customer relationship and a view to the future that’s flexible to adapt to ever changing market forces.Congratulations to all our winners last night. I’m proud to work with industry leaders like you. #iamintellast_img read more

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Why Isn’t Science at Homeland Security Peer Reviewed?

first_imgSince being established 6 years ago, the Science and Technology Directorate of the Department of Homeland Security has been the black sheep (subs. required) of the federal scientific community, with lawmakers criticizing it from time to time for poor management, shoddy accounting, and cluelessness over the setting of priorities. At a House of Representatives hearing this afternoon on how the directorate is doing, legislators discussed yet another concern: the lack of peer review in funding research projects. Cindy Williams, a Massachusetts Institute of Technology researcher who chaired a study of the S&T directorate at the behest of the National Academy of Public Administration (NAPA), told the House Science Subcommittee on Technology and Innovation that DHS was awarding “many basic research projects” without “competition or peer review.” She suggested that the directorate follow the example of other science agencies like the National Science Foundation in giving out grants, and “that funds be awarded on a competitive basis based on scientific peer review except in cases when that is clearly not feasible.” The testimony prompted Representative Adrian Smith (R–NE), the top Republican on the panel, to ask Brad Buswell, acting under secretary of the directorate, if the agency would take Williams’s advice. Buswell was noncommittal. “I agree that competition is good, and that peer-review is one means of assuring that we are selecting high quality projects,” he said, adding that at least some of DHS-funded research projects—including proposals funded through the agency’s Centers of Excellence at universities—were indeed selected using peer-review. But he then added that DHS’s practice of reviewing research proposals internally was no less rigorous than peer-review by scientists outside the agency. Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)That’s the message DHS officials apparently conveyed to NAPA officials when Williams and her colleagues were conducting  their study, as Williams said in a comment later on during the hearing. In interviews with directorate officials, she said, “we were told explicitly that peer review from outside wasn’t needed because the program managers [within the directorate] were the world’s experts” in those fields. “I doubt that they are the world’s only experts.”last_img read more

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Podcast: The Mysteries of Stuttering

first_imgWASHINGTON, D.C.—Why do some people stutter while others don’t? Is the affliction heritable? And can drugs be developed to cure it? Science podcast host Robert Frederick explores the roots of stuttering, which was discussed at a session here on Sunday at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (which publishes ScienceNOW). Also check out our news story on this topic. Follow our full coverage of AAAS 2011.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)last_img read more

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Senate subcommittee moves to pull U.S. out of ITER fusion project

first_imgFor the second year in a row, Senate budgetmakers have moved to pull the United States out of ITER, the huge and hugely over budget international fusion experiment under construction in Cadarache, France. The cut comes in the Senate version of the so-called energy and water spending bill, which would fund the Department of Energy (DOE) and other agencies for fiscal year 2016, which begins 1 October. But nixing ITER is hardly a done deal: On 1 May, legislators in the House of Representatives passed their own version of the energy and water bill, which includes $150 million for the U.S. contribution to ITER—the amount the White House has requested.”This year we have recommended eliminating funding for the U.S. contribution [to ITER],” said Senator Lamar Alexander (R–TN) chair of the Senate Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development at the subcommittee’s markup of the bill today. “This saves $150 million in just this year.” The subcommittee also moved to cut funding to ITER last year, when the Democrats controlled the Senate and Dianne Feinstein (D–CA) chaired the energy and water subcommittee. But the final budget bill for fiscal year 2015, signed by President Barack Obama on 16 December 2014, contained $150 million for the project.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)The $35.4 billion bill would bump spending on DOE’s basic research arm, the Office of Science, by 1.5% to $5.144 billion. That’s more than the 0.7% increase in the House spending bill but a far cry from the 5.3% boost that the White House has requested. Nevertheless, Alexander said the budget would put the United States on the path to doubling spending on basic energy research—presumably meaning the DOE science program minus ITER, which could cost the United States a total of $4 billion or more. “Doubling basic energy research at the Department of Energy is one of the most important things we can do to unleash our free-enterprise system to provide cheap, clean, reliable energy,” he said.The bill would also boost the budget of DOE’s Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E) by 3.9% to $291 million, far short of the 16% increase requested by the White House, and above the flat budget of $280 million in the House bill. ARPA-E’s role is to quickly transform the most promising ideas from basic research into budding technologies.Other details of the bill should be presented Thursday, when it is scheduled to go before the full Senate Appropriations Committee.The White House has already said it would recommend that the president veto the House version of the energy spending bill.last_img read more

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How the sandfish lizard stays sand-free

first_imgThe sandfish lizard spends most of its life buried in the sand—emerging only to eat, poop, and make love. This lifestyle helps the lizard evade the sweltering desert heat in the Middle East and North Africa, but it causes another problem: inhaling sand particles. Yet when scientists looked into the respiratory tract and lungs of five dead lizards, they couldn’t find a single grain of sand. They couldn’t find an obvious filter in the lizard’s respiratory system, either. Puzzled, the scientists attached sensors to the chests of living lizards and studied their breathing patterns. They found the lizards breathe out with about 60% more intensity inside their sandy burrows than when they are aboveground, which might allow them to expel sand particles from their nostrils. The scientists also estimated a 70% drop in the speed of inhaled air when it hits the widest section of the lizard’s respiratory tract. This likely means that as the air slows down, sand particles fall and get trapped in mucus and cilia that line the section, the scientists report today in the Journal of Experimental Biology. From there, some particles are blown out during exhalation and others are swallowed, after which they pass through the digestive tract and out of the body. At least, that’s the latest theory, supported by the fact that the lizards’ guts were full of sand.last_img read more

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Plastic makes up nearly 70% of all ocean litter

first_imgPlastic makes up nearly 70% of all ocean litter By Katherine KorneiApr. 4, 2017 , 11:00 AM Every day, humans generate millions of tons of garbage. And although a lot of that litter ends up in landfills, some enters the ocean by accident or through illegal dumping. Now, researchers have compiled a new database that reveals just how widespread ocean litter is, from the infamous “garbage patches” of the North Pacific to piles of trash on beaches around the world and in the deep ocean. LITTERBASE, and its accompanying maps, together draw on data from more than a thousand studies from 1960 to 2017. The most polluted spots, which host more than 10 billion pieces of litter per square kilometer, include beaches and patches of sea off the coasts of South Korea and Jordan. Most of that litter—close to 70%—is plastics, with metal and glass contributing to the remainder. And microplastics, shards of plastic smaller than 5 millimeters, are particularly prevalent. That’s because large pieces of litter break down in sunlight and ocean currents. All of our litter means that life under the sea isn’t easy: The database also reveals that more than 1200 aquatic species—mammals, fish, crustaceans, and others—are coming into contact with the litter by eating it, living in it, or becoming entangled.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)last_img read more

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Trump cuts to NSF mostly rejected by House panel, but it nixes new ships

first_img NSF has requested $183 million for that account. Some $78 million would go to continue work on the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope in Chile and the Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope in Hawaii. The rest of the money would be used to start building the first two of the three ships.NSF had proposed building two ships, but Senate appropriators last year convinced their colleagues to add a third ship and gave NSF an additional $53 million in 2017 to get started. Culberson’s panel has never liked that project, however. Last year it voted to eliminate funding for them, and this year’s mark reiterates that stance.The good news is that the House bill effectively takes that $105 million cut and applies it to NSF’s research programs. The bad news is that Senate appropriators will likely restore the money in their version of NSF’s budget. When they do, the result could be that much less for NSF’s six research directorates. An artist’s conception of a new regional class research vessel. Trump cuts to NSF mostly rejected by House panel, but it nixes new ships By Jeffrey MervisJun. 28, 2017 , 3:00 PMcenter_img Oregon State University A House of Representatives spending panel wants to spare the National Science Foundation (NSF) from most of the 11% cut that was proposed by President Donald Trump for its 2018 budget. But it would do so in part by eliminating funding for three mid-sized research vessels that Congress last year told NSF to start building.A panel led by Representative John Culberson (R–TX) will vote tomorrow on a 2018 spending bill that covers NSF and several other science agencies. A draft of that legislation, released today, sets NSF’s next budget at $7.338 billion, some $134 million below its current level but $685 million above the president’s request.The House mark holds NSF’s six research accounts level, at $6.033 billion. NSF’s education directorate would also tread water, at $880 million. The biggest variation from 2017 would come in its major research facilities account, which funds new construction.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)last_img read more

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3D printing doubles the strength of stainless steel

first_img 3D printing doubles the strength of stainless steel Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory 3D printing has taken the world by storm, but it currently works best with plastic and porous steel—materials too weak for hard-core applications. Now, researchers have come up with a way to 3D print tough and flexible stainless steel, an advance that could lead to faster and cheaper ways to make everything from rocket engines to parts for nuclear reactors and oil rigs.Stainless steel was first invented nearly 150 years ago, and it remains widely popular today. It’s made by melting conventional steel—itself a combination of iron and carbon (and sometimes other metals like nickel)—and adding in chromium and molybdenum, which prevent rust and corrosion. A complex series of cooling, reheating, and rolling steps gives the material a microscopic structure with tightly packed alloy grains and thin boundaries between the grains that create a cell-like structure. When the metal is bent or stressed, planes of atoms in the grains slide past one another, sometimes causing crystalline defects to connect with each other—producing fractures. But strong boundaries can halt these defects, making the material tough, yet still flexible enough to be formed into a desired shape.3D printing researchers have long tried to reproduce this structure. Their setup starts with a powdery layer of metal alloy particles laid on a flat surface. A computer-controlled, high-powered laser beam then advances back and forth across the surface. Particles hit by the laser melt and fuse together. The surface then drops down a step, another layer of powder is added, and the laser heating process repeats, binding the newly melted material to the layer below. By repeating this tier-by-tier addition, engineers can build complex shapes, such as rocket engines.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)The problem has been that, on a microscopic level, printed stainless steels are usually highly porous, making them weak and prone to fracture. “The performance has been awful,” says Yinmin “Morris” Wang, a materials scientist at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in California. Several years ago, Wang and his colleagues came up with an approach for using lasers and a rapid cooling process to fuse metal alloy particles together in a dense, tightly packed structure.Now, they’ve extended that work by designing a computer-controlled process to not only create dense stainless steel layers, but to more tightly control the structure of their material from the nanoscale to micron scale. That allows the printer to build in tiny cell wall–like structures on each scale that prevent fractures and other common problems. Tests showed that under certain conditions the final 3D printed stainless steels were up to three times stronger than steels made by conventional techniques and yet still ductile, the scientists report today in Nature Materials.“What they have done is really exciting,” says Rahul Panat, a mechanical engineer at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. What’s more, Panat says, is that Wang and his colleagues used a commercially available 3D printer and laser to do the work. That makes it likely that other groups will be able to quickly follow their lead to make a wide array of high-strength stainless steel parts for everything from fuel tanks in airplanes to pressure tubes in nuclear power plants. And that, in turn, will likely only increase the growing fervor over 3D printing. By Robert F. ServiceOct. 30, 2017 , 12:00 PM A new technique is set to strengthen 3D printed stainless steel parts, such as this previously printed rocket engine component.last_img read more

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Dybala: ‘Juve showed experience’

first_imgPaulo Dybala feels Juventus “sent a signal, we have the necessary experience” to turn around difficult situations after his brace beat Lokomotiv Moscow 2-1. The Russians had taken a shock lead after 30 minutes, but La Joya scored at the 77th and 79th to transform the Champions League match in Turin. “I really needed these two goals. It was a good result for me and for the team, as we suffered, but have the necessary experience to keep calm and find a way through,” Dybala told Sky Sport Italia. Does this show that Juve can play with Dybala, Gonzalo Higuain and Cristiano Ronaldo together? “We can work on it, the Coach has his ideas and we’ll work on them in training to improve together.” The Bianconeri are still unbeaten in all competition this season, dropping points only to Fiorentina and Atletico Madrid. “We sent the usual signal, which is that this is not a Juventus side without experience or talent. We can have our say.” Watch Serie A live in the UK on Premier Sports for just £11.99 per month including live LaLiga, Eredivisie, Scottish Cup Football and more. Visit: https://subscribe.premiersports.tv/last_img read more

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Gattuso favourite for Udinese job

first_img Watch Serie A live in the UK on Premier Sports for just £11.99 per month including live LaLiga, Eredivisie, Scottish Cup Football and more. Visit: https://subscribe.premiersports.tv/ Udinese are taking 24 hours to consider coach Igor Tudor’s position after back-to-back embarrassing defeats to Atalanta and Roma, with Gennaro Gattuso the favourite. The 7-1 loss to Atalanta on Sunday evening was shocking, but partially excused by the fact they were down to 10 men for an hour. However, on Wednesday night they incredibly lost 4-0 at home against a Roma side that had Federico Fazio very harshly sent off just 32 minutes in. According to Sky Sport Italia, Tuttomercatoweb, La Gazzetta dello Sport and others, Udinese directors are taking a few hours to think about the various alternatives. Gattuso is believed to be the favourite, especially as he was in the stands for the 7-1 defeat to Atalanta, alongside his long-term assistant manager. The former Milan coach has already turned down offers from Genoa and Sampdoria this month, so there is no guarantee he’d accept Udinese. Other candidates include Pasquale Marino and Stefano Colantuono.last_img read more

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Maran: ‘No Cagliari limits’

first_imgRolando Maran saw Cagliari’s “best performance of the season” to beat Atalanta 2-0 and won’t set limits on their ambitions after going joint third. “I think it was our best performance of the season. This was an extremely tough fixture, as Atalanta were on great form, they had scored in every game and we decided the best way of approaching it was to force them to defend,” explained Maran on DAZN. “Both teams were on the attack constantly and that made for a very entertaining match. We ran from start to finish, everyone showed the right spirit and the great thing about these lads is that whoever I choose, they all give their contribution as part of the team unit. “If we rest on our laurels, we’ll never improve. We have to create continual motivation, both as a squad and as individuals. We watched Atalanta this week to prepare and decided we had to get closer to their approach, the way they face everyone with no fear and by playing their football. “We want to go beyond our limits and see what we can do. It’s all about finding the right path to improvement.” Cagliari are now level with Atalanta in fourth place after 11 rounds, so can they follow in those footsteps with European ambitions? “Obviously, there is now more attention on us, as is natural in this position, but it should only be relatively of interest. What matters is taking it one game at a time and not resting on our laurels. We must always strive to do better.” Watch Serie A live in the UK on Premier Sports for just £11.99 per month including live LaLiga, Eredivisie, Scottish Cup Football and more. Visit: https://subscribe.premiersports.tv/last_img read more

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