Tennessees Strange Path to Sweet 16 Suggests Its a Big Threat to

The number next to Tennessee’s name in the NCAA tournament bracket, 11, makes the Volunteers look like heavy underdogs against Michigan on Friday night. How Tennessee got to the Sweet 16 makes it look like a serious upset threat.Teams that are underseeded tend to outplay their seed, as I wrote last week. So do teams that have to play their way into the main tournament bracket, which I wrote about in a separate article. Yet most of these teams still lose their next game, when they face heavy favorites. Tennessee, thanks to a kind draw, is in the small group of teams that were underseeded, had to play their way in, and then won their next game. Similar teams went on to achieve major tournament success.Ken Pomeroy’s ratings on Selection Sunday ranked Tennessee as the 13th best team in the country, worthy of a No. 4 seed. And the Volunteers have played like it since, winning their play-in game over Iowa by 13 points and then crushing UMass and Mercer by 19 and 20, respectively. No other team got to this year’s Sweet 16 with two wins as lopsided as Tennessee’s.The Volunteer’s next opponent, Michigan, is the Midwest’s second seed and reached last year’s championship game. The Wolverines are favored over Tennessee by 2.5 or three points by Las Vegas sports books.But teams like Tennessee have been dangerous at this stage. The Vols — by virtue of beating Iowa and playing their way into the tournament — joined a group that historically outperforms its pre-tournament level by two points per game. Those two points, however, usually aren’t enough against their next, higher-seeded opponents.By beating UMass, Tennessee became just the 33rd play-in winner to win its next round (including in that group teams that had to win games in the early 1980s to advance and face a team that got a bye). How much these teams were underseeded is correlated (R>0.32) with three measures of later success: margin of victory in their next game, subsequent tournament wins and eventual finish. (The last two aren’t redundant because the tournament’s field size and number of rounds have changed.)Underseeded Play-in Winners That Won Their Next GameFive of the 32 teams before Tennessee were underseeded by four or more, according to their pretournament Simple Rating System ranking, as calculated by my colleague Benjamin Morris. (Pomeroy ratings don’t go back to the 1980s.) All five won their next games in the tournament — as Tennessee did against Mercer — and four went to the Final Four, including national finalist UCLA in 1980. No team before Tennessee was underseeded by even six spots; the Vols were slotted seven spots below where they should have been.FiveThirtyEight’s model, which takes into account Pomeroy’s ratings and teams’ performance during the tournament, gives the Vols a 47 percent chance of beating Michigan on Friday. The game is essentially a tossup – a rarity for a matchup between a No. 2 seed and a No. 11. read more

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Why Is The US So Good At Womens Soccer

Even though the United States is a bit insecure about its place in the world’s most popular sport, the U.S. women’s national soccer team has been dominant on the world stage for nearly a quarter-century. Tonight it will face off in the semifinals of the Women’s World Cup against Germany, with nothing less than the title of “greatest of all time” at stake. Each team has two World Cup championships, and they’ve been the two top-ranked teams in the world since FIFA’s rankings began in 2003. The winner will take the lead in World Cup finals appearances and will have the inside track to finish atop 2015’s rankings.So how did we get here? Basically, it boils down to two things: 1) Women’s soccer has been on a great run for the past 30-plus years in the U.S., to the point where it’s poised to become our most popular women’s sport, and 2) the rest of the world has been relatively apathetic and/or hostile to the women’s game.U.S. women’s soccer truly seemed to arrive in the public’s attention after the 1999 World Cup. If you’re old enough to have experienced the excitement and drama of it, there’s no way you could ever forget:This success didn’t come from nowhere. Since almost immediately after the implementation of Title IX (which became law in 1972, with compliance required by 1978) U.S. women’s soccer has grown like crazy. Probably the cleanest and easiest venue to see how this has played out is at the high school level; the National Federation of State High School Associations (NFHS) has high school athletics participation data going back to the ’70s:In the late ’70s, the number of high school women playing soccer was in the low five figures. By the time America won the World Cup in 1991, there were more than 120,000. By the time it won in 1999, there were more than 250,000. Now it is approaching 20 percent of all high school female athletes — about 375,000 — and has surpassed baseball/softball as the third-most-played team sport.Soccer has grown both by taking women from other sports and by capturing a disproportionate share of “new” female athletes as more young women began to play sports. Note that the percentage decline for basketball — by far the most mature women’s sport in the country — looks steep, but the change in total number of players is fairly small (there were more women playing high school basketball in 2013-14 than in 1976-77.) Soccer, though, has still been adding numbers to its ranks rapidly, despite a bit of a slowdown in its growth shortly after 1999:Soccer looks like it has a good chance of taking the top spot in the next 10-20 years. Yes, volleyball has been on a nice run of late, and looks likely to pass basketball as the most-played sport as early as this year. But volleyball is down from its peak (see chart above), and the upper limit for soccer is still unknown.For as much as the rest of the world loves soccer, it has been much slower to embrace the women’s game than the U.S. In England, women playing soccer was effectively banned (at least at venues that hosted men’s teams) from 1921 to 1971, and in Germany it was banned from 1955 to 1970. At around the time Title IX was heating up in the United States, women’s international soccer basically didn’t exist. According to FIFA, there were only three national teams and two international matches played in 1971.And while the women’s game is still growing worldwide, it has a long way to go. The latest comprehensive statistics from FIFA come from its “Big Count” in 2006. In it, women made up about 11 percent of registered soccer players worldwide, and just 13 percent of youths. While the Big Count hasn’t been updated, more recent studies haven’t suggested any major shifts, and FIFA still uses a figure of 12 percent in its literature.What’s worse, even those numbers are being skewed — by the United States. In that same report, the U.S. had more than 1.5 million registered female youth players — more than half of the world’s total. Take all U.S. youth out of the equation, and just 8 percent of the young soccer players in the rest of the world were female in 2006.Also, in the U.S., women’s soccer has more parity the higher up the ladder you go. Of all FIFA-registered youth in the U.S., 40 percent are female. In high schools, young women make up 47 percent of all soccer players. In the NCAA, 53 percent of soccer players are female, including 61 percent of those in Division I.Given that we pretty much started out on a similar playing field and have devoted more interest to women playing soccer in this country, I’m actually led to wonder why it is that we’re not even more dominant.For example, Germany has probably the most robust network of young women playing soccer outside of the U.S. Per capita its network is about the same as America’s: The U.S. has about five times as many registered youth women’s players as Germany (based on the data in the FIFA country-by-country factbook), fitting well with a population difference of about 5x for 15-24-year-old females (judging by here and here).If all else were equal, the U.S. should be smoking Germany: Both countries have similar youth participation rates, and we have five times more youths to draw on.This isn’t the type of sports mystery that can be easily solved, but the best answer is probably something along the lines of “they take soccer more seriously.” And there are some pretty good hints of that in FIFA’s data: For example, 94 percent of all the FIFA-registered players in the U.S. are youths, compared with only 31 percent in Germany. In raw numbers, that means we have a little more than 100,000 relatively serious adult female players compared with Germany’s 650,000 plus. While I generally think youth or high school participation is a great proxy for potential talent pools, in this case I think the adult participation disparity tells you quite a bit about each country’s soccer culture. We may have the numbers advantage, but we don’t treat soccer as a national passion project.At least not yet. Give us a couple more wins in Canada and we’ll see.CLARIFICATION (July 1, 10:30 a.m.): The “rise of soccer” chart has been labeled to reflect that hockey includes both ice and field variants. UPDATE (July 1, 7:20 a.m.): Tuesday night, the U.S. women’s national team beat Germany 2-0, making this article’s headline even more prescient than usual. Below, Benjamin Morris looks at how America’s unique youth soccer culture has helped ensure the dominance of the USWNT. read more

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Transfer Quarterbacks Are All The Rage But Do They Deliver At Their

Kyler MurrayTexas A&M109.19Oklahoma203.26+94.07 Brock BerlinFlorida161.09Miami (FL)128.65-32.45 Greyson LambertVirginia108.02Georgia139.50+31.48 Tom SavageRutgers123.45Pittsburgh138.24+14.80 Brandon McllwainSouth Carolina99.15California104.41+5.26 Beyond sheer volume, this year’s group of transfer quarterbacks is especially fascinating because it might also be the most talented bunch the sport has seen. Jalen Hurts’s father was not far off when he speculated after the 2017 season that Hurts could be the “biggest free agent in college football history.” The quarterbacks potentially debuting in new uniforms next weekend include a national champion in Hurts and three former five-star recruits (Fields, Washington’s Eason and Northwestern’s Johnson). This could have a major effect. Oklahoma does not need Hurts to do much more than his numbers would already indicate. Even an average 4.9-point bump in passer rating from his career 148.8 would put him among last season’s 20 most efficient quarterbacks in the major conferences.No matter what becomes of this year’s crop of transfers, schools will surely keep swapping quarterbacks in the future. Transfers can be good for the coaches, who find a one- or two-year solution to their quarterback vacancies. After two of his quarterbacks transferred, Arkansas coach Chad Morris replaced them this past offseason with graduate transfers Ben Hicks, originally at Southern Methodist, and Nick Starkel, from Texas A&M. “As I’ve shared all along, we are always in the quarterback market. It doesn’t matter — we are always in that market,” he said last winter. And it appears quarterback reps are going to remain scarce at Clemson, for example, with Heisman co-favorite Lawrence only a sophomore.Still, high expectations will follow a transfer anywhere. It would be hard to ask Hurts to replicate the Heisman-winning seasons of Mayfield or Murray. Expecting Fields, a sophomore with 39 career passing attempts, to equal what NFL first-round draft pick Dwayne Haskins did last season is also a stretch.But that doesn’t mean those teams won’t try. “If Jalen does win the starting job from everything I’ve seen, I’m not sure there’s anything we’ve done before I wouldn’t do with him,” Oklahoma’s Riley said in a radio interview last month. Defenses should buckle up. The twists and turns are just getting started. Russell WilsonNC State135.47Wisconsin191.78+56.31 Ryan WillisKansas104.36Virginia Tech138.01+33.65 Jake LutonIdaho100.19Oregon St.129.33+29.14 Kevin CraftSan Diego St.109.18UCLA101.72-7.46 Everett GolsonNotre Dame138.21Florida St.149.16+10.94 A.J. SuggsTennessee113.27Georgia Tech113.35+0.08 Joe DaileyNebraska111.92North Carolina114.10+2.18 Robert MarveMiami (FL)107.19Purdue125.91+18.72 Clint TrickettFlorida St.151.55West Virginia132.40-19.15 Jake HeapsBrigham Young114.13Kansas97.00-17.13 Ryan FinleyBoise St.115.63NC State140.04+24.40 Ryan MallettMichigan105.69Arkansas158.11+52.42 Steven ThreetMichigan105.26Arizona St.133.41+28.15 Not every QB transfer is a program saviorQuarterbacks who threw at least 50 passes at another FBS school before transferring to a Power 5 program and how their passer rating changed, 2000-18 Brandon HarrisLSU133.86North Carolina72.34-61.52 Baker MayfieldTexas Tech127.66Oklahoma189.39+61.72 Jordan WebbKansas118.11Colorado103.72-14.39 Keller ChrystStanford128.89Tennessee130.78+1.90 Sam KellerArizona St.142.15Nebraska133.74-8.41 Will GrierFlorida145.61West Virginia169.18+23.57 Davis WebbTexas Tech138.37California135.63-2.74 Tyler MurphyFlorida121.05Boston College126.19+5.14 Scott McBrienWest Virginia110.42Maryland142.04+31.62 Jarrett StidhamBaylor198.95Auburn144.35-54.60 Pete ThomasColorado St.121.17NC State115.07-6.09 Patrick TowlesKentucky116.80Boston College113.16-3.64 Gardner MinshewEast Carolina127.10Wash. St.147.56+20.46 Peyton BenderWash. St.106.30Kansas113.66+7.36 Danny O’BrienMaryland123.54Wisconsin120.73-2.80 Matt LoVecchioNotre Dame125.27Indiana114.24-11.03 First schoolSecond school Jeremiah MasoliOregon130.56Mississippi121.11-9.45 Mitch MustainArkansas120.53USC110.47-10.06 Shea PattersonMississippi141.22Michigan149.85+8.63 Wilton SpeightMichigan132.20UCLA125.99-6.21 Kyle BolinLouisville141.56Rutgers98.21-43.34 PlayerNameRatingNameRatingChange You don’t have to look hard at college football these days to find somebody, somewhere, talking about transfers. More players are switching teams each year, and more are seeking waivers that grant immediate eligibility at their new school — and it seems like just about everybody in the sport has an opinion about it.“The issue with the transfer portal is we’ve gotten very liberal in giving people waivers, so, when we do that, it becomes free agency,” Alabama coach Nick Saban said last month. Michigan coach Jim Harbaugh, too, has cautioned against “free agency in college football.”But even calling it “free agency” is understating the flurry of moves. Of the top 25 teams in the preseason coaches’ poll, as many as eight could start a transfer at quarterback later this month. Five of those eight quarterbacks1This figure could be as high as six, depending on the outcome of the quarterback battle at Washington State University. Anthony Gordon, a junior-college transfer, appeared in two games for the Cougars last season. He is currently competing with Gage Gubrud, who recently transferred from neighboring Eastern Washington, for the starting job, though the current rumors coming out of Pullman appear to favor Gordon. were not active for their current team last season. For comparison, in the NFL — which, of course, has literal free agency — only about four of 32 starters weren’t on their current team last season.2This includes rookie Kyler Murray in Arizona and traded quarterbacks Joe Flacco and Nick Foles in Denver and Jacksonville, respectively. Depending on the outcome of the quarterback battle in Miami, either recent signee Ryan Fitzpatrick or trade acquisition Josh Rosen will start. A few other quarterback competitions remain unresolved as of publication.In the last decade, transferring in college football has increased in frequency. Some of this is due to changes in NCAA guidelines and the establishment of a transfer portal that facilitates contact between players and coaches. The NCAA’s evolving stance on immediate-eligibility waivers — which allowed Michigan’s Shea Patterson to play last season after transferring from Ole Miss, and Justin Fields to suit up for Ohio State this season — has expedited the transfer movement.The optimal approach is to find an elite talent and develop him, as Clemson has done with Trevor Lawrence and Alabama with Tua Tagovailoa. But those who miss out on that chance sometimes turn to the next-best option — and it often works. Oklahoma coach Lincoln Riley, entering his fifth year with the program, has coached the last two Heisman Trophy winners. Both were transfers, Baker Mayfield from Texas Tech and Kyler Murray from Texas A&M. It’s no longer only bench players who move schools in search of more playing time; athletes of all levels and abilities are taking advantage of their newfound mobility to develop their careers.The impact of this wave of transfers is evident at both the college and professional level. Alabama and Georgia produced the current starting quarterbacks for four of the top five teams: the Crimson Tide’s Tagovailoa, the Bulldogs’ Jake Fromm, Oklahoma’s Jalen Hurts and Ohio State’s Fields. Five of the 11 quarterbacks taken in the 2019 NFL draft were transfers.3The five were Kyler Murray (Texas A&M to Oklahoma), Will Grier (Florida to West Virginia), Ryan Finley (Boise State to North Carolina State), Jarrett Stidham (Baylor to Auburn) and Gardner Minshew (East Carolina to Washington State).The college football programs themselves have also incentivized player movement. Teams’ increasing reliance on younger quarterbacks chases away the rest of the depth chart: If a freshman has a firm hold on the starting job, there’s no playing time available for three years, barring an injury. Lawrence’s emergence at Clemson in 2018, for example, sparked two departures — Kelly Bryant to Missouri and Hunter Johnson to Northwestern — while Georgia’s Fromm pushed out two more, Fields to Ohio State and Jacob Eason to Washington.The search for playing time creates a ripple effect: Soon after Fields showed up at Ohio State, quarterback Tate Martell, previously expected to start in 2019, transferred to Miami. After Hurts arrived at Oklahoma, Sooners quarterback Austin Kendall left for West Virginia.It’s not just at the highest level of the sport. In addition to the eight top 25 teams, Mississippi State (Tommy Stevens, formerly of Penn State), Virginia Tech (Ryan Willis, previously at Kansas) and Missouri (Bryant) are among the power-conference schools who have settled on or considered starting transfer quarterbacks.But what gets lost in the drama of the quarterback carousel is that these transfers are rarely a magic solution. Yes, Mayfield and Murray were the two most successful transfer quarterbacks this century, based on passer ratings.4Three of the pair’s five combined seasons at Oklahoma — Mayfield’s 2016 and 2017 campaigns, and Murray’s 2018 season — rank among the four most efficient passing seasons in NCAA history, according to Sports-Reference.com. But schools turning to a transfer to transform their program often end up disappointed.Since 2000, 94 players have attempted at least 50 passes in a season for two different schools. Here we see the trend over time: five quarterbacks joined a new team between 2000 and 2004, while 13 transferred schools between 2005 and 2009. Twenty-eight quarterbacks transferred between 2010 and 2014, and 48 of those 94 have departed for greener pastures since 2015.Of that group, 58 transferred to a Power 5 school. (This includes both quarterbacks who transferred from non-Power 5 schools as well as quarterbacks who transferred between Power 5 schools.) Nineteen Power 5 transfers improved their passer rating from their first stop to their second by at least 15 points, an impressive rise. But 12 more saw their passer rating drop by at least 15 points.5This also omits the quarterbacks who seek greener pastures but didn’t end up earning enough playing time to merit inclusion on our list. The average change in passer rating is plus-4.9, and the average bump in completion percentage is 2 points, both modest upticks. However it may seem, it’s just not that easy to move towns, learn a new offense, adjust to new teammates and coaches and blossom into a completely different player. Jon BeutjerIowa129.16Illinois126.77-2.39 Jake RudockIowa129.96Michigan141.50+11.54 Allan EvridgeKansas St.104.44Wisconsin116.50+12.06 Kenny HillTexas A&M154.84Texas Christian138.36-16.47 Michael MachenKent St.100.56Baylor82.09-18.47 John O’KornHouston123.90Michigan105.48-18.42 Dayne CristNotre Dame127.00Kansas96.52-30.48 Matt MooreUCLA101.47Oregon St.131.69+30.22 Darell GarretsonUtah St.137.68Oregon St.103.97-33.71 Source: Sports-Reference.com R. KovalcheckArizona108.91Vanderbilt119.07+10.16 Wes LuntOklahoma St.137.31Illinois119.54-17.77 Zach MaynardBuffalo124.42California128.36+3.94 Danny EtlingPurdue110.95LSU144.36+33.41 read more

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Ohio State football recruit shot again 17yearold girl killed

For the second time since April, Ohio State football recruit Jamel Turner has been shot, according to police. This time, Turner’s injuries sustained are much more serious, as Turner was initially listed in critical condition and the 17-year-old girl he was with was killed.The Columbus Dispatch reported Sunday that Turner survived the night and was upgraded to stable condition.Turner, 18, and 17-year-old Tracy Banks were both shot multiple times Saturday morning in Youngstown. Police said Turner was found lying near a stop sign at an intersection outside of the house in which Banks’ body was found.The linebacker/defensive end recruit played at Fork Union (Va.) Military Academy after transferring from Ursuline High School in Youngstown, where he was declared ineligible before his senior year.He was shot twice April 17 while riding as a passenger in a car that contained marijuana and several guns, according to the police report. Turner downplayed the incident on his personal Facebook page, writing that he “just got hit twice is all” and that he “still can play football so its all gravy.”His Facebook page has since been deactivated.OSU coach Jim Tressel issued a statement, saying, “I’m so sad to hear of Jamel’s misfortune. I have not communicated with Jamel, but am certainly praying for him at this time.”Stay tuned to www.thelantern.com for further updates. read more

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Bauserman hopes preseason performance leads to playing time in the fall

Joe Bauserman picked the wrong era to try to be Ohio State’s quarterback. Early in his OSU career he was forced to compete with a highly touted recruit in senior Terrelle Pryor and is now entering his final year battling another highly touted recruit in freshman Braxton Miller. However, the redshirt senior has been given a golden opportunity to be the starting quarterback for the Buckeyes throughout Pryor’s five-game suspension. Pryor, along with offensive lineman Mike Adams, running back Dan Herron, wide receiver DeVier Posey and defensive lineman Solomon Thomas are suspended for the first five games of the 2011 season for selling memorabilia and receiving improper benefits. Coach Jim Tressel will join them for failing to report their violations. Bauserman said that although the situation isn’t ideal, he is making the best of the opportunity. “It’s all you can ask for sometimes,” he said. “Under the circumstances, it sucks. You’d like to have all five of those guys, and it’s tough. But it’s an opportunity and I’ll try to take advantage of it.” Bauserman played football and baseball in high school and was drafted by the Pittsburgh Pirates in the fourth round of the 2004 MLB draft. He played three seasons in the Pirates’ farm system before walking on to the OSU football team. The 25-year-old former Minor League pitcher said he doesn’t miss baseball and is only concerned about the football team. “I don’t even think about it,” Bauserman said. “I’m focused on one opportunity and what’s going on right now.” Bauserman has fought all spring to get a leg up on the three other candidates looking to replace Pryor during his suspension. Miller, redshirt sophomore Kenny Guiton and redshirt freshman Taylor Graham each threw a touchdown pass in Saturday’s Spring Game. Bauserman said he thought he had a successful spring. “I feel good about what I did,” he said. “I have no control about whether I’ll be playing or not. It’s up to coach Tress and coach Sic (quarterbacks coach Nick Siciliano) if they’re going to give me a chance.” He said there will always be excitement with major recruits coming to campus but that he has everything in his game that those recruits have. “People want excitement. A guy that they’ve never seen before is going to get them thinking about it,” Bauserman said. “It doesn’t bother me. I feel like I can play at this level just as well as anybody else.” Senior center Mike Brewster said Bauserman’s experience should help him in the competition. “Joe’s a real solid guy. He knows the offense. He’s going to make the smart play. That’s what you want from your quarterback,” Brewster said. “I think Joe will be the No. 1 probably going into camp and, you know, he’s comfortable back there and that always makes you feel good if your quarterback knows everything about the offense.” Bauserman, however, said he does not know what Tressel will decide. “You try to get out there and do what you can do, and at the end of the day, coach will make the right decision,” Bauserman said. Junior defensive lineman John Simon said he has been impressed with Bauserman during spring practice. “Joe’s had a terrific spring for us throwing passes on the money,” Simon said. “(He’s a) great scrambler, always finds the open receiver, so I think he’s doing a nice job for us.” Bauserman said he has the skills and mobility it takes to be the starting quarterback for the Buckeyes. “You have to be somewhat mobile to be able to slide up in the pocket, have quick feet, get from progression to progression, move around and get out of some sticky situations sometimes,” Bauserman said. Although Bauserman was the first quarterback on the field for the Buckeyes during the scrimmage, he did not throw his touchdown pass until the final play of the game. He said he hopes the Spring Game helped his stock as the starting quarterback. “I feel good about what I did today,” Bauserman said. “We made some strides and got better as a team. I have no control if I’m going to be playing. It is up to coach Tressel. Today is about getting better.” read more

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JT Barrett picks up records awards early in career

OSU redshirt-freshman quarterback J.T. Barrett (16) carries the ball during a game against Kent State Sept. 13 at Ohio Stadium. OSU won 66-0.Credit: Mark Batke / Photo editorOhio State redshirt-freshman quarterback J.T. Barrett has made quite the impact during his first three weeks as a starter.The Wichita Falls, Texas, native joined fellow Texan Kenny Guiton atop the OSU record book when he tied for the most touchdown passes in a single game as he tossed six against the Kent State Golden Flashes.Barrett also became the first Buckeye to throw for more than 300 yards in a game since Troy Smith did it in 2006 against Michigan. Barrett finished with 312 on 23 of 30 passing.Because of his performance, Barrett was named Big Ten Offensive Player of the Week on Monday, in addition to earning his second Big Ten Offensive Freshman of the Week honor.The young quarterback became the first Buckeye to win the Big Ten offensive Player of the Week award since running back Carlos Hyde won it following a Nov. 16 win against Illinois in which he rushed for 246 yards and scored five total touchdowns.Barrett said after the win against Kent State on Saturday that he feels like he is improving game by game.“I feel like I’m progressing each week. I’m just trying to get better each week,” he said. “I definitely feel more comfortable every week as I get more reps. Things are starting to slow down for me in the game.”OSU coach Urban Meyer said he purposely put the ball in Barrett’s hands early and often against the Golden Flashes so he could further evaluate the young quarterback’s progression.“I wanted to force him to make plays, and receivers — it’s not just him, it’s the whole combination of quarterback/receivers,” Meyer said Saturday. “I thought he played good. I thought there was a couple misses, too, now that we could have had.”The misses that Barrett made were minimal, but he attributes the limited mistakes to getting used to the speed of the game.“That is one thing (senior quarterback Braxton Miller) told me,” Barrett said. “He said ‘at first, everything is going to be flying around, and you will be really unsure and things like that but as you go, it starts to slow down,’ and that is just game experience.”Redshirt-sophomore wide receiver Michael Thomas, who has caught four touchdowns from Barrett in OSU’s first three games, said he believes in the quarterback’s abilities.“J.T. is a real mature guy. We hold each other accountable and trust each other,” Thomas said. “I trust him and tell him I’ve always got his back out there.”That trust has been evident on the field as Thomas is currently the Buckeyes’ leading receiver with 11 catches for 214 yards and the four scores.Going forward, Meyer said he, as well as his coaching staff, is looking for more ways to put Barrett in a position to succeed.“We actually did some empty (formations), I think he’ll be a good empty quarterback, five receiver set, so we’re still, once again, figuring out exactly how we’re going to be moving the ball as an offense once we start getting to the Big Ten season,” Meyer said.The Buckeyes are set for a bye week before taking on the Cincinnati Bearcats on Sept. 27 at Ohio Stadium. Kickoff is set for 6 p.m. read more

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Football JK Dobbins recognized as Big Ten CoFreshman of the Week

Ohio State freshman running back J.K. Dobbins (2) runs the ball in the third quarter of the 2017 OSU- Army game in Ohio Stadium on Sep. 16. OSU won 38-7. Credit: Jack Westerheide | Photo EditorRunning back J.K. Dobbins continues to make his presence felt this season as he was named Big Ten Co-Freshman of the Week Monday. The recognition follow his performance Saturday against Army, when the true freshman ran for 172 yards on 13 carries and scored a touchdown. He shares the honor with Rutgers quarterback Johnathan Lewis.This is the second week the award was given to Dobbins as he was was named Big Ten Freshman of the Week following a record-breaking performance in which he rushed for 181 yards on 29 carries against Indiana. That was the most rushing yards ever by an Ohio State first-year running back in his debut.Dobbins has not only been a key cog in Ohio State’s offense so far this year, but he has also been among the most productive running backs in the nation. His 451 total rushing yards are eighth in the country, and his average of 7.73 yards per carry sits at 13th-best among FBS players.Dobbins joins only Archie Griffin (1972) and Maurice Clarett (2002) as the only two freshman to total 170 yards in a game twice in a single season. Neither former Buckeye running back reached a third game with that total.Dobbins will attempt to become the first Ohio State freshman running back to do just that when he and the rest of the Buckeyes take on UNLV Saturday in Ohio Stadium at noon. read more

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Mens Soccer Ohio State hosts Cleveland State in 17th annual Connor Senn

Ohio State men’s soccer head coach Brian Maisonneuve watches the Buckeyes play in the first half of the game against the University of South Florida on Sept. 7, 2018. Credit: Casey Cascaldo | Photo EditorThe Ohio State men’s soccer team (1-7-2, 0-3-1 Big Ten) returns to the pitch Friday night as it takes on Cleveland State in the 17th annual Connor Senn Memorial Match at Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium.The match will feature a tribute to the legacy of former Ohio State men’s soccer player Connor Senn, who collapsed during a match at the University of Akron in 2001, and died later that evening. Cleveland State (2-5-1, 1-2-1 Horizon) comes to Columbus fresh off a victory over the University of Illinois at Chicago, powered by a hat trick by junior midfielder/defender Vlad Jandric.Between the pipes, Cleveland State has trotted out a pair of freshmen this season, alternating between Nicklas Rulle and Alex Gyerman. Gyerman has played almost twice as much as Rulle and has compiled a 1.32 goals against average and a .759 save percentage. Meanwhile, Rulle comes into Friday’s match with a 2.40 goals against average and a .417 save percentage.On the other end of the field, one of the strengths of Ohio State has been the play of redshirt junior goalkeeper Parker Siegfried. Siegfried has a 1.44 goals against average and a .681 save percentage.He said has continued belief and confidence in the 10 teammates in front of him. “It’s about getting our confidence back. I don’t think there’s a game this year that if we didn’t play it over we have a good chance of winning,” Siegfried said. “I think that everyone feels that, coaching staff feels that, players feel it and so just getting that confidence when we roll the ball up Friday night, just having that for 90 minutes is going to do it.”Offensively, the Viking attack is spearheaded by two players, Jandric and junior forward Gabriel Pewu, both of whom have three goals on the season.Ohio State head coach Brian Maisonneuve talked about the offensive skill that Cleveland State possesses.“Cleveland State’s a good team, I mean they’re very good going forward. Similar to Rutgers is they can hurt you going forward, they have some really good pieces, some good athletes and good soccer players and they’re dangerous on the offensive side,” Maisonneuve said.Maisonneuve also said the team hopes for an improvement after an exhibition match that occured between Ohio State and the Vikings this past spring.“They like to possess the ball but yet they’re athletic enough to go direct, so they’re going to cause some challenges,” Maisonneuve said. “I know we played them in the spring, and the result didn’t go our way, so the guys know what they’re all about, and I think they scored 5 on us in the spring, so they’re a dangerous attacking team for sure.”The Buckeyes and Vikings are scheduled to start at Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium at 7 p.m. on Friday. read more

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Gallery Mens Basketball vs UNC Pembroke

Ohio State freshman guard Duane Washington Jr. (4) blocks a member of UNC Pembroke’s offense during the first half of the game on Nov. 1. Ohio State won 81-63. Credit: Amal Saeed | Assistant Photo EditorThe Ohio State Men’s Basketball team took on UNC Pembroke in its final exhibition on Nov. 1 at Value City Arena. Ohio State won 81-63. Photos by Amal Saeed and Casey Cascaldo.

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Poldark rape scene sparks Ofcom complaints

first_imgPoldark appears to force himself on Elizabeth Credit:BBC "You would not dare," she tells him Eleanor Tomlinson and Aiden Turner as husband and wife, Demelza and Ross Eleanor Tomlinson and Aiden Turner as husband and wife, Demelza and RossCredit:BBC “To be more precise – in the novel Warleggan, the point of departure for the relevant scene is indeed consistent with the potential for rape. But what then actually happens is not described but is left entirely to one’s imagination.”The only way to judge what my father intended is to read the novels as a whole. Doing so it becomes clear, from earlier scenes as well as from Elizabeth’s immediate reactions and later mixed emotions, that what finally happened was consensual sex born of long-term love and longing. She added: “However, as programme makers, we needed to decide what the audience would actually see. And, as far as possible, to bring to life what the original author intended the scene to depict.”We were fortunate to have Winston Graham’s son Andrew as our consultant on the series so we were able to clarify with him what his father’s intentions for this scene were. What you saw on screen is consistent with what we believe those intentions to have been.” Heidi Reed plays Elizabeth Heidi Reed plays ElizabethCredit:BBC “It was, as Aidan Turner has put it, ‘unfinished business emotionally’.”Debbie Horsfield, Poldark screenwriter, said no two readers would imagine a scene the same way, and that is particularly true of this scene as the action is left entirely to the reader’s imagination. Television viewers have complained to Ofcom over what critics describe as a rape scene in BBC period drama Poldark.The media watchdog confirmed it has had seven complaints so far following Sunday night’s episode, with 17 complaints direct to the BBC.An Ofcom spokesman said the complaints would be assessed “before deciding whether to investigate or not.”In the episode, Ross Poldark, played by Aidan Turner, turns up unannounced at the house of his former fiancee Elizabeth, played by Heida Reed.He kicks in the door and demands that she cancels her wedding to his enemy George Warleggan. Poldark appears to force himself on Elizabeth center_img Heidi Reed and Aiden Turner star in PoldarkCredit:BBC Sarah Green, co-director at charity End Violence Against Women, said: “It is definitely portrayed very much as a rape.”The female character says ‘no’ and there are also non-verbal signs. She is moving away from him and pulling away from him. There is lots of stuff that is ambiguous.”She added: “The directors have done something really ambiguous. It is a really appalling message, which is they have made the representation of non-consensual sex ambiguous by making her appear to change her mind.”Asked why she thought this was the case, Ms Green continued: “The problem the producers have found, because this character is extremely popular, they can’t represent him as that, they can’t represent him as doing something criminal.” The show has not shied away from intimate scenesCredit:BBC The show has not shied away from intimate scenes She ignores what he says and instead asks him to leave, prompting him to take her face in his hands and forcefully kiss her.When she pushes him away and insists she loves George, he forces another kiss on her before looking at the bed.Elizabeth tells Poldark: “You will not dare. You will not dare.”He replies: “I would Elizabeth. I would and so will you.”The lead character then pushes her on to the bed and she appears to finally give in to him. Poldark, based on the novels of Winston Graham, was originally made for TV in the 1970s when it attracted audiences of 15 million and the remake has helped BBC1 to its highest share of an audience in a decade.Commenting on the controversial scene, Mr Graham’s son Andrew said: “There is no ‘shock rape’ storyline in the novels. To say so is to misconstrue my father’s text. The BBC has cut nothing and Mammoth Screen’s portrayal of these scenes is entirely true to my father’s writing. Heidi Reed and Aiden Turner star in Poldark “You would not dare,” she tells himCredit:BBC Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings.last_img read more

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