Beal, Wall lead Wizards past Hawks

first_imgBulacan town gears up for biggest cookie jar View comments Panelo: Duterte only wants to emulate strong political will of Marcos Young Bucks hope they’ve learned lessons in time for Game 6 Wildlife rescuers asked to turn over animals to DENR Ex-Bulacan town vice mayor, village chief shot dead Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Washington Wizards guards John Wall (2) and guard Bradley Beal chest-bump during the second half in Game 5 of the team’s first-round NBA basketball playoff series against the Atlanta Hawks, Wednesday, April 26, 2017, in Washington. The Wizards won 103-99. (AP Photo/Nick Wass)WASHINGTON—Back at home, and back in charge, Bradley Beal scored 27 points, and John Wall added 20 points and 14 assists, leading the Washington Wizards to a 103-99 victory over the Atlanta Hawks on Wednesday night for a 3-2 lead in their first-round Eastern Conference playoff series.Dennis Schroder led the Hawks with 29 points, making a career high-tying five 3s, and 11 assists. But after his basket from beyond the arc pulled Atlanta within 101-99 with 70 seconds left, Wall responded with a 21-foot pull-up jumper.ADVERTISEMENT Palace: Crisis over ABC-CBN franchise unlikely Ai-Ai delas Alas on Jiro Manio: ‘Sana pinahalagahan niya ang naitulong ko’center_img Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Taal Volcano evacuees warned against going home MOST READ A miss followed from Paul Millsap, who had 21 points and 11 rebounds, but after Wall’s jumper was off the mark, the Hawks seemed to waste too much time at the other end and the buzzer sounded.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSEnd of his agony? SC rules in favor of Espinosa, orders promoter heirs to pay boxing legendSPORTSBreak new groundSPORTSMcGregor blasts Cerrone in 40 seconds in UFC return Filipinos turn Taal Volcano ash, plastic trash into bricks PLAY LIST 01:40Filipinos turn Taal Volcano ash, plastic trash into bricks01:32Taal Volcano watch: Island fissures steaming, lake water receding02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite Presidency bid needs ‘deep reflection’ – Sara Duterte LATEST STORIES Duterte’s ‘soft heart’ could save ABS-CBN, says election lawyerlast_img read more

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3-day sweep nets 10 in arrests for parole violations

first_img• Photo Gallery: 8/12: Parole Sweep Having a bag of plastic toys was enough to send a paroled sex offender living at a Santa Fe Springs motel back to prison. Although innocent looking, the tiny plastic parachutists could be used as “child lures,” according to parole agents who monitor released sex offenders, and are strictly forbidden. “The toys were found in a bag next to a bed,” state Department of Justice Agent Gabriel Rogers said as he carried them out of the motel room. Hidden inside the parolee’s mattress, police also found a heroin syringe and a scale with narcotics residue. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREFrumpy Middle-aged Mom: My realistic 2020 New Year’s resolutions. Some involve doughnuts.The motel houses 15 convicted sex offenders. It is one of only a few places in the Whittier area where the parolees can be placed because the management allows it. And it is far enough away from any schools. Since enduring stinging criticism from politicians and community leaders in February for allegedly “shuffling” released sex offenders between motel rooms, parole agents have been under increased pressure to find permanent housing for parolees. It is no easy task. “Finding housing for sex offenders has always been difficult, and now it’s more difficult,” said Jerome Marsh, a district administrator for the state Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation’s Division of Adult Parole Operations. “We have to find placement for them when they come out \ … And we have to look for appropriate locations a half-mile from schools. That drastically shrinks the area we can place people.” Hotels and motels are used only as temporary housing, but it can sometimes take months to find something permanent, Marsh said. It costs the state about $350 a week to house one sex offender in a motel. “The alternative is to have homeless, paroled sex offenders,” Marsh said. “We don’t want that.” Once they are placed in a hotel or motel, sex offenders must be closely monitored. Even the smallest infraction will land them back behind bars. Last week, Marsh joined parole agents and representatives from seven other law enforcement agencies in a three-day, parole-compliance sweep. The surprise searches are a condition of parole for many offenders. The operation was the largest of its kind so far this year. The sweepsTuesday, Wednesday and Thursday involved about 40 officers and agents. In all, 46 convicted sex offenders were targeted in Whittier, Santa Fe Springs, Norwalk, Downey, Pico Rivera, Bellflower and La Mirada. State parole and probation agents, sheriff’s deputies, Whittier police, California Highway Patrol officers, U.S. Housing and Urban Development personnel, Department of Children and Family Services agents and members of a Department of Justice sex-offender task force started planning for the operation in July. During a final planning meeting earlier this month, the group plotted out the remaining details. “We’ve already gotten word of some violations that are occurring. One guy has been calling \ numbers,” Al Gonzalez, an assistant unit supervisor for the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation’s Santa Fe Springs office, told the assemblage. “We’re not worried about how many arrests we’re getting,” he said. “We just want to make sure they’re doing what they’re supposed to.” Then the officials decided on their first target: the Santa Fe Springs motel. “Let’s hit all the rooms at one time, so one guy isn’t throwing his porn away while we’re somewhere else,” Parole Agent Renee Ramos suggested. For the large and complex operation, the officers had to carefully plan how those arrested would be taken to jail, and how they would respond in the event something went wrong. Teams were designated by colors; a common radio frequency was chosen. “We get in, do what we gotta do and get out,” Gonzalez said. Before day-break Tuesday morning, the 36 agents and officers gathered at the sheriff’s Norwalk Station, where they broke into teams and reviewed the files of parolees they would visit. In the dark, a slow-moving caravan of law enforcement officials – armed with guns, bullet-proof vests and a well-organized strategy – pulled up to the to the motel. Fanning out, the team members knocked on 13 doors simultaneously. “State parole. Open up!” the agents yelled. Surprised men and women, jarred from sleep, opened their doors and were immediately handcuffed while agents searched their rooms. Among the offenders were men who had been convicted of molesting children, raping mentally disabled people and elderly women and indecently exposing themselves. Parole restrictions for sex offenders are different than for other parolees. Most are not permitted to live with young children or to use the Internet. “With sex offenders, we’re looking for pornography, child porn, computers, children’s toys or child lures – small pets, stuffed animals, children’s clothing,” Marsh said. Wearing gloves, the officers searched dresser drawers, refrigerators, microwaves, envelopes, trash cans, luggage and other items. A man convicted of committing lewd and lascivious acts with a child under the age of 14 was quickly arrested when officers found narcotics in his room. Hours later, the searches were completed, five people were under arrest for violating their parole. For the following two days, the team met at 4 a.m. at the Norwalk Station, breaking up into three teams, with each team visiting five locations. They found parolees in possession of pornography, sex toys, cartoon videos and restricted items. At the end of the three-day sweeps, 10 parolees had been arrested, and 13 children were removed from residences and relocated. After Thursday’s sweeps, the tired but excited team members met at the Norwalk Station to sum it all up. “Considering the fact that these guys are watched closely, I didn’t expect to have as many arrests as we did,” Gonzalez said. CHP Officer Raquel Stage said she was surprised that people living with or near the parolees had no idea about their crimes. “We went to a house where a sex offender lived with other people – one was a pregnant woman and her husband. No one knew he was a sex offender. “They said, `He looks so nice and passive,”‘ Stage said. “Something like this really shakes people up.” sandy.mazza@sgvn.com (562) 698-0955, Ext. 3026160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img
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