Provide basic requirements security to Rohingya children

first_imgParticipants at the roundtable jointly organised by Prothom Alo and UNICEF at the Prothom Alo office in the capital on Sunday. Photo: Prothom AloDiscussants at a roundtable stressed that the Rohingya children should be provided with basic education, food and other necessities as well as proper security as long as they are in Bangladesh.The roundtable was jointly organised by ProthomAlo and UNICEF at the Prothom Alo office in the capital on Sunday. Prothom Alo associate editor Abdul Qayyum moderated the roundtable.Chief guest at the roundtable, Bangladesh Human Rights Commission chairman Kazi Reazul Hoque, said almost 400,000 Rohingya children took shelter in Cox’s Bazar since the latest crisis began with violent attacks in Rakhine on 25 August.Speaking about providing legal assistance to the Rohingyas in Bangladesh, assistant external relations officer of UNHCR Souvik Das said Bangladesh lacks any kind of refugee law. However, identifying the newborn Rohingyas in Bangladesh and providing them with birth certificates can help them, he added.He also mentioned that the majority of the Rohingya female refugees were pregnant or were child brides.He also said most of the children in the camps were traumatised following the atrocities they witnessed in Myanmar and proper security for them has to be ensured in the camps.Speaking about the latest condition of the Rohingya refugees in Cox’s Bazar, executive director of Coast Trust, Rezaul Karim Chowdhury, said Bangladesh should have two types of plans for managing the current refugee crisis.He said, plan A should be providing basic education for the Rohingya children and also ensuring long term education programmes in the refugee camps, so that the refugee children can get a stable future.He said plan B should be to continue pressure on Myanmar to take back the Rohingyas.Special guest additional secretary of social welfare ministry Khairul Anam said the Rohingya influx into Bangladesh has continued for the last 40 years. He also appreciated the fact that different local as well as international organisations were working along with the government to cope with the crisis.Khairul Anam said currently there are a total of 10 Rohingya refugee camps in Cox’s Bazar and Teknaf where a total of 12,000 children have been registered till now.Among others, programme coordinator of BRAC M Nazrul Islam, child protection expert of UNICEF Monira Hasan, head of child rights and protection, Plan International, Tania Nusrat Zaman, national program officer (adolescent and youth gender) of UNFPA Humaira Farhana, deputy director of community development center Tsadduk Hossain, and deputy country director of Handicap International Sharmin Khan, also addressed the roundtable.last_img read more

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Papa Johns to Pull Founder from Marketing after Racist Language

first_imgBy Candice Choi, AP Food Industry WriterJohn Schnatter, founder of Papa John’s,  will no longer be at the center of the company’s logo and TV ads because it plans to pull his image from its marketing after reports he used a racial slur.The decision was made by top executives but details of the change are still being worked out, according to a person inside the company with knowledge of the decision who wasn’t authorized to speak publicly. The person was not aware of any plans to change the pizza chain’s name.Papa John’s plans to pull founder John Schnatter’s image from marketing materials, as seen here, after reports he used a racial slur. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa, File)Schnatter has long been the face of the brand, and the company has acknowledged in regulatory filings its business could be harmed if Schnatter’s reputation was damaged. Papa John’s got a taste of that last year, when Schnatter stepped down as CEO after blaming disappointing pizza sales on the outcry surrounding football players kneeling during the national anthem.This week, Papa John’s was already trying to further publicly distance itself from Schnatter after Forbes reported he used the N-word during a conference call in May. Schnatter apologized and said he would resign as chairman. That prompted the company’s stock to recover some of the losses it suffered after the report, though the shares were down slightly July 13.Schnatter remains on the board and is still the company’s largest shareholder with nearly 30 percent of the stock.It’s not yet clear how quickly the company will be able to remove Schnatter from marketing materials, the person with knowledge of the decision said. In addition to appearing in TV ads, Schnatter’s image is on packaging and at the center of a logo that is all over the company’s website. It was still there as of Friday morning.Keith Hollingsworth, a professor at Morehouse College’s business department, said keeping Schnatter on marketing would be a signal to people that the company does not have a problem with his comments, or that it didn’t think they were a big deal.“Five years from now, they might be able to start bringing him back. But at the moment, you have to be very decisive and show you take this very seriously,” Hollingsworth said.Schnatter had used the slur during a media training exercise in May, Forbes reported this week. When asked how he would distance himself from racist groups, Schnatter reportedly complained that Colonel Sanders never faced a backlash for using the word.Schnatter subsequently issued a statement acknowledging the use of “inappropriate and hurtful” language.“Regardless of the context, I apologize,” the statement said.Fallout has already included Major League Baseball indefinitely suspending a promotion with Papa John’s that offered people discounts at the pizza chain after a player hit a grand slam. The University of Louisville also said Schnatter resigned from its board of trustees, and that the school will evaluate the naming arrangement for Papa John’s Cardinal Stadium, according to the Louisville Courier-Journal.Papa John’s, based in Louisville, Ky., began operations in 1984 and had more than 5,200 locations globally. For the first three months of this year, the chain said a key sales figure fell 5.3 percent in North America.last_img read more

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