Morris Farm Rivers, Creeks Go Dry

first_imgRivers and creeks are drying up in Morris Farm, a community of about 50,000 inhabitants northeast of Paynesville City.Among the most affected water ways are Mango and Gbeh rivers and Desert Hill and Crab Hole creeks.Several inhabitants of Morris Farm told the Daily Observer during the weekend that they have to get up as early as 4:30 a.m. to be able to get water for domestic use from the remaining hand pumps in the area.Owners of restaurants, tuck shops, bars and other entertainment centers also complained that they are having problems accessing safe drinking water for their customers.“We encountered some serious difficulties in catering to our Christmas Day customers,” restaurant proprietress Hawa B. Giddings said. She added that she has considerably reduced the quantity of food she prepares every day as a result of the constant lack of sufficient water.“I would like for the Liberia Water and Sewer Corporation (LWSC) during this dry season to extend its water connection to our community,” Mrs. Giddings said.Resident Milton M. Bleetan said the swamp land, which was brushed and burnt in preparation for planting corn, cucumber, bitter ball and okra, dried up in November. He added that the small creek that he used to rely on to plant cash crops dried up on December 5.“I would like for agriculture extension officers from the Ministry of Agriculture (MOA) to come and help us with new methods for planting and maintaining our wells,” Mr. Bleetan pleaded. Many residents, however, said that they still get water from hand pumps in the area, but that they find it difficult to get the quantity of water they need.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Continue reading

Arts in Burbank schools get Warner Bros. boost

first_imgThe money will pay for instruments and teacher training, said Michelle Crozier, the foundation’s chairwoman and vice president for corporate responsibility at Warner Bros. “The program is a viable framework that, with the proper financial and public support, will provide quality arts programs in Burbank schools for many years to come,” she said. Officials are planning how to raise the rest of the $10 million, though payouts are slated to begin next year, said Joel Shapiro, a BUSD deputy superintendent. “There has not been adequate funding for the most part for many years,” he said. “Whenever school districts have been on lean times, arts education has been the subject most impacted. “It’s part of the education of a well-rounded person to be educated in all four areas of the arts – visual arts, dance, music and drama.” BURBANK – A foundation intended to bolster arts education in the city’s public schools has begun with a $300,000 donation from a local studio. The organizers of the Burbank Arts Education Foundation plan to create a $10 million endowment to ensure that Burbank Unified School District arts programs have a steady source of cash and equal access for all students. “It’s so all the students in Burbank can appreciate the arts, not just the ones that are affluent enough to pay for private lessons,” said Peggy Burt, a foundation board member and arts teacher. The foundation was established Thursday with $300,000 in seed money from Burbank-based Warner Bros. Entertainment. About 40 percent of the profits from the endowment will be funneled to Burbank Arts for All, part of a county program to preserve arts education at public schools. eugene.tong@dailynews.com (818) 546-3304last_img read more

Continue reading