168 GPF ranks graduate from Pedal Cycle Course

first_imgJust two months after the Guyana Police Force (GPF) cashed in on a total of 200 specially equipped bicycles donated by the Georgetown-based US Embassy, some 168 ranks successfully graduated from a Pedal Cycle Course, which sought to train the officers to maximise the efficiency of these crime-fighting tools.Officials of the Guyana Police Force joined by a fraction of the graduating ranks of the Pedal Cycle CourseThe course, which commenced on September 4 and ended on October 20, focused on much-needed capacity building in cycle repairs, tactical positioning of bikes and training group ride, among other areas.The ranks participating in this initiative comprised 162 Constables, three Corporals and three Lance Corporals, from the various policing divisions across the country.Upon successfully completing the training, the 168 officers of the GPF were awarded certificates and subsequently briefed by their respective Divisional Commanders and other senior officials on the ways in which they can apply their newfound knowledge and skills in relation to the safe use of these bicycles in combating crime.The GPF Pedal Cycle Course was spearheaded by Corporal Kareem Hoosein and Woman Corporal Haley Fraser. Both Hoosein and Fraser were among the 12 officers who benefited from a safe use and efficiency forum, which was hosted by the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department, in Nevada, prior to the handing over of the bicycles earlier this year.It was back in August that the US Embassy in Georgetown presented the Police Force with the 200 pedal cycles and accessories as part of the country’s commitment to promoting community policing in Guyana.This contribution, stemming from the US Government’s Big Brother Mission, carries a value of US$145,000.At the handing-over ceremony, US Ambassador to Guyana, Perry Holloway underscored the significance of this endowment by saying, “The United States Department of State through the Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement (INL) assists countries around the world in strengthening the capacity of their law enforcement and supports their efforts to promote the rule of law.”last_img read more

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Coega port blasting ahead

first_img23 February 2005South Africa will soon have a brand new high-capacity port. Developers say Ngqura, a multi-user deepwater port on the Coega River, and part of the multi-billion rand Coega industrial development zone (IDZ), is rapidly taking shape.The government is spending about US$400-million on the port – and other improvements in and adjacent to the Coega IDZ.Construction on the port is already far advanced, and the facility is expected to be ready for commercial traffic by the end of 2005. It will have a capacity for accommodating bigger container vessels than any of South Africa’s seven other commercial ports.The filling up of the Ngqura harbour basin was completed in July 2004, which means that 5.75-million cubic metres of water have now replaced the 14-million cubic metres of beach sand that were removed.With the depth of the channel and the protected position in Algoa Bay, the port is in one of the best spots for a harbour along the South African coast.A channel carved by an ancient glacier allowed the development of the port to up to 23 metres. Protected from south-westerly winds by a finger of land, the port’s bay has 330 anchor days per year.Coega’s cutter suction dredger finished cutting an approach channel into the basin in December, meaning that the water in the basin now rises and falls in time with the tide.“With the quay walls complete, the successful filling of the harbour basin in July last year, the dredging finished, and the steady progress of the breakwaters, our main focus at the moment is the positioning of the concrete structures [caissons]”, said National Ports Authority resident engineer Chris Matchett.Matchett said the caissons were towed into position using tugboats and positioned by a system of anchors and winches before being flooded and sunk on prepared stone foundation beds.SouthAfrica.info reporterlast_img read more

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Boateng: ‘My own racism task force’

first_imgFiorentina forward Kevin-Prince Boateng has had enough of racism in football and claims he will be starting his “own task force” next year. The 32-year-old is “sick of it” and claims clubs should be “punished with a points deduction” system if they can’t make their fans behave in Italian stadiums. “It’s not enough to prevent the access of part of the fans after the insults towards [Mario] Balotelli,” he told the Corriere della Sera. “I hope the public has learned something and no longer replicate certain behaviour. “We need to ban them. The clubs need to pay for their fans’ behaviour. And if necessary, punish them with a point deduction.” After a speech at a UN meeting on racial discrimination in sports, Boateng is not happy with the actions carried out by the clubs. “It was an important day in my life. But after that, what has been done to stop the trend?” he added. “There’s been a task force, summarized by a series of meetings and ideas. The “No to Racism” campaign in the Champions League is not enough. “I’ll do it myself in 2020. I’m organising my task force with events involving other players. “I’m sick of it. People don’t understand how Balotelli, Boateng or [Kalidou] Koulibaly feel when they get home. “We are alone. I go crazy when I hear comments like, ‘so what, you earn €5m’. There are scars on you that you can’t erase.” Watch Serie A live in the UK on Premier Sports for just £11.99 per month including live LaLiga, Eredivisie, Scottish Cup Football and more. Visit: https://subscribe.premiersports.tv/last_img read more

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Education Minister Commends School Boards

first_imgMinister of Education, Rev. the Hon. Ronald Thwaites, has commended the “extraordinary voluntarism” of the country’s school board members, noting that they give freely of their time and effort to support principals, teachers and students.“The school boards are the eyes and ears of the Ministry of Education; they are our delegates in the particular school. They are the unsung heroes and heroines, whether at the primary level, the secondary level or at the early childhood level. In the most difficult of situations, they have done so well,” he stated.The Minister was speaking today (April 19), at the launch of a handbook developed by the National Council on Education (NCE) for school boards, at the Kingston and St. Andrew Parish Library on Tom Redcam Drive.He stated that in constituting a school board, it is important to select people, who have the time and the willingness “and the best person who is going to assist the school, and I urge people of faith and goodwill to open themselves for service as school board members.”Minister Thwaites welcomed the NCE manual, noting that it “offers the reference point for the school board members in every aspect of their functioning.”He further commended the NCE members, past and present, who have contributed to the development of the publication.Entitled ‘All Hands on Board’, the manual was developed as part of efforts by the NCE to advance its school board training mandate. The user-friendly reference guide will assist boards of management in undertaking their functions effectively and judiciously.Executive Director, NCE, Merris Murray, said the manual will be distributed to all schools through the regional offices. She informed that it will also be uploaded to the Council’s website at www.nce.org.jm.United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) Representative to Jamaica, Robert Fuderich, who attended the launch, said the handbook is a crucial tool in the child-friendly toolkit to enable school boards to provide the leadership needed.He said it will also ensure that schools achieve the highest standards of academic outcomes and safety, among other things.“It is not enough to have a hunch on how schools should be governed; it is not enough to say ‘I attended a school, so I must know how to manage a school’. But a whole host of skills and knowledge of the system are required to make the school board operate effectively and as a team,” he stated.Principal of Jamaica College, Ruel Reid, endorsed the publication, noting that it will assist in standardising quality within schools, which, ultimately, begins with the board.The book is designed to: ensure compliance with the legal, regulatory and policy framework governing the operation of boards of management of public education institutions; reinforce the role of school boards in advancing the Ministry of Education’s strategic objectives and policy direction; and ensure a common understanding of the role of the board in school administration.It also seeks to heighten the awareness of boards of management, as critical agents of effective schools; ensure coverage of all areas of management key to effective school governance; and provide for consistency in the interpretation and application of all prescriptive and enabling pieces of legislation governing school operation.The book was conceptualised in partnership with the UNICEF.CONTACT: CHRIS PATTERSONlast_img read more

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NB premier Mikmaq chief discussed ending blockade allowing shale gas exploration to

first_img(Editors note: The handwritten notes obtained by APTN National News are posted below the story.)By Jorge Barrera APTN National NewsDays after Elsipogtog Chief Arren Sock demanded Houston-based firm SWN Resources Canada leave New Brunswick, he sat at a hotel conference table with the province’s premier discussing a strategy that would see the company stay and continue its controversial shale gas exploration work, APTN National News has learned.On Oct 1, during Treaty Day celebrations, Sock demanded the company leave the province within 24 hours. He read out a band council resolution declaring Elsipogtog was taking “stewardship” over all unoccupied Crown lands.But in a closed-door meeting Monday in Fredericton, Sock and Premier David Alward discussed a timeline to end a blockade targeting SWN machinery and allow the company to finish some of its exploration work, according to three pages of handwritten notes from the meeting obtained by APTN National News.A Mi’kmaq-led anti-fracking highway blockade in Rexton, NB, has trapped SWN’s exploration vehicles in a compound. The company responded by obtaining an injunction last Thursday to clear the barricades. The threat of impending police action as a result of the court order spurred talks Sunday and Monday between Alward and Sock.Two of Sock’s advisers confirmed the notes were taken during Monday’s meeting and asked APTN National News not to report their content. They said the notes contained information unknown even to the majority of the band council.While Sock’s advisers would not say who wrote the notes, they revealed the broad strokes of Monday’s discussion. The conversation with the premier went beyond the blockade and SWN’s immediate exploration work. The two sides discussed the creation of a provincial consultation framework to govern how industry deals with First Nation communities on future energy projects, they said.APTN National News has decided not to identify the two advisers.The ongoing blockade on Route 135 sits about 80 kilometres north of Moncton and 15 km northeast of Elsipogtog. The blockade is the latest salvo in a battle against SWN’s shale gas exploration that raged throughout this past summer and led to dozens of arrests.Mi’kmaq, Acadian and Anglophone residents in the area believe the discovery of shale gas will lead to hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, and they fear the extraction method poses a threat to the area’s water and environment.SWN’s injunction against the blockade expires on Oct. 12 and the company’s lawyers have agreed to let the injunction expire as a result of talks between Sock and Alward.Elsipogtog residents supporting the blockade widely believe Sock is trying to negotiate SWN’s permanent exit from the region and bring an end to any shale gas exploration in the future. But according to the handwritten notes and Sock’s advisers, evicting SWN from the province is not on the table.“Time is what is needed to settle the volatile situation,” reads one entry in the notes.The two sides discussed letting SWN finish its seismic imaging exploration work along a section on Hwy 11, which is near the blockade site. In exchange, the company would forgo other work requiring explosives, according to one advisor. SWN currently has a line of geophones stretching for about five kilometres on the highway which is under close surveillance by the company.“Line 4 abandoned if line 11 is completed,” says one of the lines in the notes.SWN is also willing to put up with protests against its work if the blockade ends, said one of Sock’s advisers.“Blockade down, protest continues,” reads one entry in the notes.The notes also seem to set a possible day for the release of SWN’s trapped vehicles.“Thursday equipment moved out?” says one the items listed in the notes and numbered “4.”While the notes do not state which “Thursday” is being referred to, it follows three previous items numbered 1, 2 and 3 with the words “improperly consulted, working group” and “week…time limit Monday to next Wednesday.” The words “improperly consulted” appear in two of the pages of notes.The advisers would not provide details about the proposed timelines, saying only that the “working group” would be discussing all the items listed in the notes. They said Alward agreed Elsipogtog was not properly consulted before SWN entered its territory.After Monday’s meeting in Fredericton’s Crowne Plaza Lord Beaverbrook Hotel, Sock and Alward, emerged holding braids of sweetgrass and jointly announced the creation of the working group. Both leaders said they hoped the group’s efforts would lead to the blockade’s peaceful end.According to the notes, it appears the Sock and his advisers want discussions with the province to include issues such as housing, the creation of a “healing to wellness court,” and a tax agreement on gaming revenues. The items are expected to be part of the working group’s agenda, according to one of Sock’s advisers.Sock and his advisers appear to have concluded they can’t convince Alward to evict SWN from the province.“If it’s not SWN, it’s always going to be another company,” said one adviser told APTN National News.New Brunswick’s Tory government is betting heavily on investments from energy firms like SWN to help turn the province’s moribund economy around. SWN is expected to invest about $47 million into the province by the end of the year. It gave Fredericton $2.4 million in cash shortly after winning a bid to explore 934,000 acres stretching from Richibucto and Bouctouche region, which includes Elsipogtog’s territory, to the southwest. The company was also awarded a license to explore 84,000 hectares in the province’s southeast.SWN is seeking to renew its exploration licenses which expire next March 31, 2014, and March 31 2015.The province wants to avoid a repeat of First Nation-led opposition that has dogged SWN’s work. Without the Mi’kmaq, local Acadian and Anglophone opposition would pose little threat to the company’s shale gas exploration. Local non-First Nation residents who frequent the camp readily acknowledge the Mi’kmaq demonstrators gave the resistance teeth.Sock and Alward have discussed creating a framework defining the “duty to consult” to allow companies like SWN to enter First Nation territories without triggering such fierce opposition. While the framework is specific to the situation in Elsipogtog, advisers claimed it will become the blueprint for the rest of the province, defining how industry deals with First Nation communities.“There is going to be a historic event come out of this,” said one of Sock’s advisers. “The agreement coming out of this working group is not just going to affect Elsipogotog; it is going to affect how industry comes to the province and how the province and industry comes to First Nation communities.”Sock’s adviser said the process would involve a referendum preceded by meetings where the company would detail their planned work in the community’s territory.“Nowhere has this happened before where First Nations and a company in the province have sat down and developed a duty to consult. To define it to the point where a band member who just sits back on welfare will know every detail as long as you go to the meetings,” said the adviser. “You are not going to get spoken for by a corporation in another part of the province…In First Nation communities this is huge…it is going to be how…TransCanada comes in and deals with communities across the province.”TransCanada is planning a $12 billion, 4,500 kilometre pipeline project to ship up to 1.1 million barrels of Alberta tar sands oil to Quebec and New Brunswick.jbarrera@aptn.ca@JorgeBarreraThe NotesDownload (PDF, Unknown)last_img read more

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