Airbus has bumper year

first_imgAirbus has had yet another stellar year with commercial aircraft deliveries in 2017 up for the 15th year in a row, reaching a new company record of 718 aircraft delivered to 85 customers.Deliveries were more than four percent higher than the previous record of 688 set in 2016.The 2017 total comprises 558 single-aisle A320 Family (of which 181 were A320neo); 67 A330s; 78 A350 XWBs and 15 A380s.Read: Boeing’s bumper yearAnd just to show that wasn’t a one-off Airbus recorded 1,109 net orders from 44 customers.Airbus delivery graphic Airbus order and delivery graphic for 2017. AirbusAt the end of 2017 Airbus’ overall backlog stood at 7,265 aircraft valued at US$1.059 trillion at list prices an extraordinary number by any measure.Fabrice Brégier, Airbus Chief Operating Officer and President Commercial Aircraft commented: “A new Airbus delivery record coupled with our fifth best order intake wraps up a remarkable year for us. This outstanding achievement is a testimony to the dedication of all our teams, and makes the company fitter, stronger and ready for the opportunities ahead.”With this year’s performance, Airbus has steadily built on deliveries year on year – with 15 consecutive years of production increase.From its four A320 Family plants in Hamburg, Tianjin, Mobile, and Toulouse, Airbus is on track to achieve rate 60 per month on single-aisle by mid-2019.It also said that the A350 XWB is on track for rate 10 by the end 2018. .The company had a host of milestones in 2017, which included: delivery of its 100th A350 XWB; the delivery of its 50th A320 Family aircraft from its FAL in Mobile; delivery of Emirates’ 100th A380; first flight of the A330neo; certification of the A350-1000; first A321neos delivered with CFM and P&W engines; inauguration of the new A330 Completion and Delivery Centre in Tianjin, China, with two first deliveries; and structural completion of the first Beluga XL.last_img read more

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Alderman’s Shoplifting Charges Upgraded to Felony

first_imgIllinois Alderman Lynne M. Johnson has now been charged with felony burglary for allegedly stealing $55.21 worth of merchandise from a Meijer store according to a statement from the DuPage County state’s attorney’s office. She had initially been charged with misdemeanor retail theft.You may remember the story. On January 31st a loss prevention associate at Meijer allegedly witnessed Johnson hiding in her purse $55.21 worth of markers, pencils, holiday party favors, and two bottles of ibuprofen. Johnson paid for other items she had in her shopping cart with a credit card but according to the LP associate, she never opened her purse and left the store without paying for the items inside. The associate stopped Johnson outside the store, escorted her to the office without incident, and then notified Aurora, Illinois, police.She was arrested with her brother outside the same Meijer store in August 2013. For that arrest, Johnson pled guilty to failing to pay for $86.60 worth of grocery items and to having $63.64 worth of health and beauty items concealed in her purse. According to court records she was granted supervision in that case.- Sponsor – “It is troubling any time an elected official is accused of wrongdoing,” DuPage County State’s Attorney Robert Berlin said in the statement, adding that the retail shoplifting charges were upgraded “following a thorough review of the facts and circumstances surrounding the allegations”.Johnson was elected in April 2013, and her term is up in 2017. Her bail after her arrest was originally set at $1,500, and she was released later that evening, records show. Johnson is scheduled to appear in court March 7 at the DuPage County Judicial Center in Wheaton, Illinois.A judge issued the upgraded $50,000 arrest warrant Friday, prosecutors said. Johnson turned herself in Monday and was released after posting the necessary 10 percent of the warrant. Stay UpdatedGet critical information for loss prevention professionals, security and retail management delivered right to your inbox.  Sign up nowlast_img read more

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Parting Words: I Am on Vacation

first_imgJuly and August is the time for a vacation. I am either at the beach or mountains, on the golf course, reading a book, or watching television. I am not thinking about writing this column. But I need to fill up the back page, so here goes with some of my favorite thoughts that may or may not have appeared before in this column.In a perfect world, life would be fair. But that is not relevant given the reality that the world we live in is not always fair. You should expect things to go your way because you have that right, but when something happens in your life that you do not like, fairness has nothing to do with it. No one is guaranteed a life of health and constant happiness. We all know of books that tell us that bad things really do happen to good people. Bad things also happen to bad people. And what is worse yet, really good things happen to really bad people. Things and people you like and don’t like are all a part of being alive.Have you ever had to face major change in your personal or professional life? Did you feel fear? A “yes” answer means you are pretty normal and in the big basket with the rest of us. I have known many really tough people I could not imagine ever being fearful of any situation, but they are. Regardless of how tough or good you are, fear is natural. I suspect that if you aren’t feeling a little fear, you are probably playing it too safe, and that should be enough right there to scare you. L’audace, l’audace, toujours l’audace.- Sponsor – Did I mention golf? Golf is a game of personal integrity and self-improvement. So much of what the loss prevention professional faces in his or her career also revolves around personal integrity and a commitment to self-improvement.The best vendor account manager I ever had was a person who was interested in my success and not just selling something. He would ask me now I was doing personally. He said “please” and “thank you.” He shared his company’s agenda and future product plans. He introduced me to others in his company, especially the bosses. He always returned my calls quickly and responded to my needs. The bottom line is there is often just a “dimes difference” in competitive products, but the little things can mean a lot in being the best.Have you ever wondered why some people just seem to get a lot of pats on the back? How do some people get a reputation for being a person who knows how to get things done? There are many LP executives who fit these descriptions. Hopefully you are one of them.It is true that your whole career will be shaped by your surroundings, by the character of the people with whom you come in contact every day. But how do you know you are with the “right” people? I use a very simple rule—they make me feel good, positive, and upbeat, and I have no fear of what they might do in our relationship. I trust them.“One piece of advice that I believe will contribute more to making you a better leader, will provide you with greater happiness and self-esteem, and at the same time advance your career more than any other advice I can provide to you. And it doesn’t call for any certain chemistry. Any of you can do it. And that advice is that you must care.” Advice from US Army General Melvin Zais of the 101st Airborne.“Making a difference in someone else’s life can be as simple as a smile, lifting a hand to help, or lending an ear to listen, especially when it might be easier to ignore the opportunity. Each day is a new day and a new chance to use what you’ve worked for and been given to light someone else’s load. It’s never too late to choose to move beyond success to significance.” Thoughts from retired US Army General Becky Halstead.Growing up, my mother would sometimes say to my brother and me, “I am sick and tired of your behavior.” She put such emphasis on sick and tired that it was disturbing and frightening, and often led to some type of punishment. There were other occasions—not as many—where she would say, “I am pleased as punch with you two.” To this day I am not sure what punch had to do with anything, but I knew it was good stuff, and she was proud of us. There is much going on in our world of loss prevention and asset protection. For me, I am sick and tired of some of it, and I am pleased as punch with other things. Overall, I think I am more pleased as punch than sick and tired. That is a good feeling.Winston Churchill said, “We make a living by what we get, but we make a life by what we give.”Okay, I’m done. Back to vacation. I will see many of you at the upcoming Loss Prevention Foundation (LPF) Learning Day September 30th in Gainesville the day prior to the LPRC’s Impact conference or at the magazine annual meeting with RILA and LPF in beautiful Hilton Head Island, SC, October 23–25. Stay UpdatedGet critical information for loss prevention professionals, security and retail management delivered right to your inbox.  Sign up nowlast_img read more

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Trump cuts to NSF mostly rejected by House panel, but it nixes new ships

first_img NSF has requested $183 million for that account. Some $78 million would go to continue work on the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope in Chile and the Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope in Hawaii. The rest of the money would be used to start building the first two of the three ships.NSF had proposed building two ships, but Senate appropriators last year convinced their colleagues to add a third ship and gave NSF an additional $53 million in 2017 to get started. Culberson’s panel has never liked that project, however. Last year it voted to eliminate funding for them, and this year’s mark reiterates that stance.The good news is that the House bill effectively takes that $105 million cut and applies it to NSF’s research programs. The bad news is that Senate appropriators will likely restore the money in their version of NSF’s budget. When they do, the result could be that much less for NSF’s six research directorates. An artist’s conception of a new regional class research vessel. Trump cuts to NSF mostly rejected by House panel, but it nixes new ships By Jeffrey MervisJun. 28, 2017 , 3:00 PMcenter_img Oregon State University A House of Representatives spending panel wants to spare the National Science Foundation (NSF) from most of the 11% cut that was proposed by President Donald Trump for its 2018 budget. But it would do so in part by eliminating funding for three mid-sized research vessels that Congress last year told NSF to start building.A panel led by Representative John Culberson (R–TX) will vote tomorrow on a 2018 spending bill that covers NSF and several other science agencies. A draft of that legislation, released today, sets NSF’s next budget at $7.338 billion, some $134 million below its current level but $685 million above the president’s request.The House mark holds NSF’s six research accounts level, at $6.033 billion. NSF’s education directorate would also tread water, at $880 million. The biggest variation from 2017 would come in its major research facilities account, which funds new construction.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)last_img read more

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