Sanjay Leela Bhansali shelves Inshaaallah

first_imgMumbai: Filmmaker Sanjay Leela Bhansali has apparently decided to shelve his much-anticipated film “In-shaa-allah”, featuring superstar Salman Khan and Alia Bhatt. The revelation was made by a source close to development, a day after both Bhansali’s production banner and Salman announced that they have decided to “push” the film. “In-shaa-allah” was scheduled for an Eid 2020 release. “Sanjay Leela Bhansali respects and loves his actors and suggestions are welcome but not if they aim to alter the narrative. Hence, he has taken the decision to shelve the film. However, they are still friends and Sanjay Leela Bhansali has immense love and respect for him,” the insider said. Also Read – I have personal ambitions now: Priyanka The project, which was a co-production between Salman and Bhansali’s banners, would have marked the director-actor duo’s first collaboration in two decades where Salman, 53, was suppose to play the lead. Bhansali made his directorial debut with 1996’s “Khamoshi – The Musical”, which starred Salman. The actor went on to feature in the director-producer’s classic “Hum Dil De Chuke Sanam” in 1999 opposite Aishwarya Rai Bachchan and Ajay Devgn. He also made a cameo in Bhansali’s “Saawariya”, which launched Ranbir Kapoor and Sonam Kapoor.last_img read more

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MaryLouise Parker To Host Second Annual Hope North Gala

first_imgThe Second Annual Hope North Gala will take place Saturday, November 1, at City Winery in Manhattan.Hosted by Mary-Louise Parker, the celebration will honor Forest Whitaker for his commitment to Hope North and Okello Sam’s vision for peace.Hope North is educating and healing the young victims of Uganda’s civil war, including orphans and former child soldiers, empowering them to become voices for peace and development.Founded in 1998 by artist and former child soldier Okello Sam, Hope North is an accredited secondary school with an international arts center, vocational training, and a working farm, staffed by Ugandan educators. Thousands of vulnerable youth have lived at Hope North and today 255 incredible students are working towards their degrees and planning careers. These youth are contributing to peace-building by organizing educational theater and soccer tournaments throughout the north, an area destroyed by years of war, reaching thousands more.Sponsorship packages, which start at $2,500, include complimentary tickets, your name or logo on gala materials, unique celebrity perks and much more. If you or someone you know is interested in sponsoring, please email gala@hopenorth.org for more information.If you are ready to purchase your tickets, a limited number are available now with pre-sale VIP benefits. Please email gala@hopenorth.org for details.Find out more here.last_img read more

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Yellowknife firm looking to create northern search and rescue base

first_imgAPTN National NewsLiving in Canada’s North can sometimes be a risky business.And when things go bad in the remote wilderness search and rescue teams are called upon to help.But there are no search and rescue bases in the region and, as APTN National News reporter Wayne Rivers will tell us, one Yellowknife company wants to change that.last_img

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May Day March at Chicano Park

first_img May 1, 2018 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsNationwide, immigration was a hot topic during May Day Marches.At Chicano Park, a few dozen people showed up to advocate for immigration as well as worker rights.Those who were there listened to speakers and watched cultural dance performances.The march was peaceful and there was no report of arrests. KUSI Newsroom, Posted: May 1, 2018 KUSI Newsroom May Day March at Chicano Park Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitterlast_img read more

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This Is Not Going To Be Easy El Paso Students Start School

first_img Share Mallory Falk/KERANearly 60,000 public school students in El Paso, Texas, begin school on Monday.On Monday, nearly 60,000 public school students in El Paso, Texas, will start the school year amid an air of mourning, fear and resilience.The first day of school in El Paso’s largest district comes more than a week after a mass shooting at a local Walmart left 22 people dead. According to a police affidavit, the suspect charged in the attack later said he had intentionally targeted “Mexicans.”“It’s not at all, in any way, a typical start of school,” says Juan Cabrera, the superintendent of the El Paso Independent School District (EPISD). “This is not going to be easy. This is going to be difficult and we are really taking this very seriously.”According to Cabrera, the school district has been contacting families affected by the shooting in order to connect them to support services. No EPISD students were killed, but Cabrera says El Paso is a close-knit community and some students have family members who were directly involved, or know people who were at the Walmart during the attack.Others — like Genesis Contreras, 7 — witnessed the shooting themselves.Genesis starts second grade on Monday. She and her family were in the store when the gunman opened fire. They escaped, but Genesis’ mom, Erika Contreras, says the experience has rattled them.“That first night, she kept telling me, ‘I don’t want to go to sleep,’ ” Contreras recalls. “I had to sleep with her and she cuddled me so hard because she was so scared and I knew that she was gonna have nightmares.”Genesis has slept with her mom every night since the shooting.Contreras says Genesis’ school knows about what she experienced, and it will have counselors available to provide support on Monday if Genesis needs it.The district says its counseling office has provided teachers guidance for how to support students who were affected by the shooting.“Having a week in between before the start of the school has really helped us,” explains Manuel Castruita, who heads the district’s counseling and advising department. He says all last week, teachers and administrators were in professional development, talking through what happened, and brainstorming ways to help students.“The first day of school, it’s a new start, a new beginning. So we have an opportunity to really set the tempo.”Castruita says on Monday some school administrators will hold a moment of silence, “acknowledging the tragedy that took place.” But he notes it’s a delicate balance: You want to be open about what happened, without retraumatizing students. He says the district will rely heavily on the social/emotional learning tools it has been implementing over the past several years.According to Castruita, the district also has strong support services, thanks to partnerships with outside organizations and a number of licensed professional counselors.“We’re not starting from ground zero or from scratch,” he says.In a video address to parents on Saturday, Superintendent Cabrera talked directly to those who felt uncertain about heading back to school: “We know your concern is genuine, but so is our commitment to provide safe learning spaces for our students,” he said. “EPISD schools are safe and we sincerely hope you feel reassured that when your kids are with us, they are our No. 1 priority.”The district’s job, according to Cabrera, is “to make sure [students] are safe, happy, sound mentally and physically, and to make sure they’re prepared for learning.”In some cases, that may mean talking about the shooting. “Kids know this is happening around them,” Cabrera says. “The worst thing we can do is not let them speak or not let them talk about what’s going on.”Genesis — who loves science and is excited to do experiments and learn about tornadoes — is more focused on starting a new year of school with a new teacher.“I’m really scared,” she says. “I know it’s gonna be a lot harder.”Her mom is also nervous. “I just wish and I pray that no matter what, she’s strong,” Contreras says. “I know she’s a child, and at any moment, she could decide that this is the moment where she breaks and wants to cry.”Contreras is glad that Genesis’ teachers and counselors will be there with her, and she trusts they will be looking out for her daughter. And with Genesis back in school, Contreras says she’ll be able to turn her attention to another pressing matter: her own mental health, after witnessing a mass shooting.Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.last_img read more

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Tennessee Officer Indicted for Killing Black Man

first_imgBy TRAVIS LOLLER, Associated PressNASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — A grand jury in Tennessee indicted a White police officer on a charge of first-degree murder for killing an armed Black man who ran when he saw police, according to a Friday news release from the Nashville district attorney’s office.An arrest affidavit said Nashville officer Andrew Delke, 25, pulled into an apartment parking lot after seeing a car he mistook for one he had been following. Hambrick, also 25, was in the area at the time and began to run. Part of the chase and the shooting were caught on video.Nashville Police officer Andrew Delke sits with his attorney John M.L. Brown at the second day of his preliminary hearing at the Justice A.A. Birch Building Saturday, Jan. 5, 2019, in Nashville, Tenn. Delke is charged with criminal homicide in the on-duty shooting of Daniel Hambrick. (George Walker IV/The Tennessean via AP)The case sparked an outcry that led to a November referendum approving the creation of a citizen oversight board for Nashville’s police force.Delke’s attorney David Raybin said in an email on Friday that he will enter a plea of not guilty to the charges. He reiterated his argument that Delke “acted in accordance with his training and Tennessee law in response to an armed suspect who ignored repeated orders to drop his gun.”Delke shot Hambrick in the back, torso and the back of his head.District Attorney General Glenn Funk has argued that Delke had alternatives, adding the officer could have stopped, sought cover and called for help.Prosecutors have also pointed to the lack of video footage or witness testimony about Hambrick turning, looking back or aiming his weapon at Delke, as Delke claimed in his interview with a state investigator.An attorney for Hambrick’s family did not immediately respond to messages from The Associated Press.last_img read more

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