16 June 1976: the day Hector Pieterson died

first_img“I saw a child fall down. Under a shower of bullets I rushed forward and went for the picture. It had been a peaceful march, the children were told to disperse, they started singing Nkosi Sikelele. The police were ordered to shoot.”(Image: South African History Online)Brand South Africa reporterThese are the words of Sam Nzima, recalling the events of 16 June 1976, when over 500 people were killed as they protested over the imposition of Afrikaans as a medium of instruction in township schools.Nzima’s photograph of the dying Hector Pieterson being carried by a fellow student was published around the world, and came to represent the anger and tragedy of a day that changed the course of South African history, sparking months of clashes between police, schoolchildren and protesters.Hector, 12, was one of the first casualties of what came to be known as the Soweto Uprising.Hastings: June 16’s forgotten heroFifteen-year-old Hastings Ndlovu was probably shot before Hector Pieterson, although he died later. But no photographer was on hand to record the moment.Another boy, Hastings Ndlovu, is believed to have been the first child to be shot on that fateful day. But Nzima, a photographer for Johannesburg newspaper The World, was on the spot when Mbuyisa Makhubo picked Hector up and, together with Hector’s sister Antoinette, ran towards a press car, into which he was bundled taken to a nearby clinic, where he was pronounced dead.“I was the only photographer there at the time”, Nzima says. “Other photographers came when they heard shots.”A few months after that, The World was banned and shut down.Hector Pieterson MuseumWhen you visit the Hector Pieterson Museum in Orlando West, Soweto, you’ll see Nzima’s legendary photograph showing the unconscious Hector being carried by Makhubo, with Hector’s sister – now Antoinette Sithole – running alongside.You might also get to see Antoinette herself, who works at the museum, giving guided tours.But don’t expect to come away with an image of what Hector looked like – the family do not have a single snapshot of their famous son.Soon after 16 June, journalists approached the Pieterson family for pictures of Hector. Photographs were handed over with the promise they would be returned – but they weren’t. Thirty years later, the search for the photographs continues.The museum, which opened on 16 June 2002, follows the chronology of the build-up to 16 June 1976, starting with the way tensions were building among Soweto’s school children, with one school after another going out on strike.The museum stands two blocks from where Hector was shot and fell, on the corner of Moema and Vilakazi Streets in Orlando West, Soweto. There are houses on all four corners of that intersection, so the museum is located up the road in Kumalo Street.Hector’s mother, Dorothy Molefi, lives in nearby Meadowlands. “I’m very proud that there’s a museum for Hector, and that children are learning about him in history,” she says. “We still visit his grave every few months.”Hector’s father died not long before the opening of the museum.The museum is an impressive red-brick building, two storeys high, with irregularly shaped windows in a haphazard pattern. The community asked that the building blend in with the dwellings around it – small red-brick, semi-detached houses with iron roofs.Walking through the large rust-red door, the immediate impression is of a cathedral, with its double volume ceiling, tall thin windows, stripped wood floors, concrete columns and tall red-brick walls.The wall opposite the door is filled with an enlarged photograph of marching children, with banners and posters protesting the use of Afrikaans in township schools.The musuem’s chief curator, Ali Hlongwane, is sensitive to the differing accounts of why that day’s protests exploded the way they did.There is some debate about the extent to which several student organisations, in particular the South African Students Organisation and the South Africa Students Movement, were involved in the lead-up to the uprising. The role of the liberation movements – the African National Congress and the Pan Africanist Congress – is also unclear.“The re-representation of the story is an ongoing process”, says Hlongwane; the museum continues to record people’s stories and add to its displays.“We may get someone come into the museum, look at the photograph, and say: ‘This is me’, or ‘I know that face’. We will then record and archive their experiences”, Hlongwane explains.There seems no doubt about the role of various cultural activists in building solidarity among the youth, inspired by Black Consciousness philosophy. Writers, poets, dancers, singers and painters captured the injustice of apartheid, and some of these works are on display.Build-up to 16 JuneBut it is generally agreed that tensions in schools had been growing from February 1976, when two teachers at the Meadowlands Tswana School Board were dismissed for their refusal to teach in Afrikaans.Students and teachers throughout Soweto echoed this sentiment, and the African Teachers’ Association of South Africa presented a memorandum to this effect to the Education Department. From mid-May around a dozen schools went on strike, and several students refused to write mid-year exams.On 16 June, students from three schools – Belle Higher Primary, Phefeni Junior Secondary and Morris Isaacson High – planned to march from their schools to the Orlando Stadium, about a kilometre from the museum, to hold a meeting. But before they got to where the museum stands today the police met them, in Moema Street.There are conflicting accounts of who gave the first command to shoot, but soon children were turning and running in all directions, leaving some children lying wounded on the road – among them Hector Pieterson and Hastings Ndlovu.A major part of the museum’s presentation of the story of the day is done through TV monitors, recording the world’s footage of the events, as South Africa had only just got television. Text panels scattered throughout the museum give eye-witness accounts and background viewpoints.Inside the museumThe museum is arranged in a series of interleading spaces joined by ramps, moving you closer to Nzima’s photograph – enlarged and waiting for you at the top of the second ramp.The interior is dominated by red brick walls, with some areas plastered and painted white and black, and others left in grey concrete. Large square windows at the top of the ramps give views of the suburb’s significant sites: Orlando Stadium, the Orlando Police Station, Moema Street, and several schools. Combined with black steel banisters and high ceilings, the effect is stunning.One of the few walled-in rooms in the museum is the Death Register, the room that records the names of the children who died over the period from June 1976 to the end of 1977.But the day, and the events that followed, had positive consequences. Thousands of students joined the broader liberation movement, ensuring that resistance to apartheid was maintained and escalated. International solidarity movements added to pressure on the apartheid government.The use of Afrikaans as a medium of instruction was dropped. More schools and a teacher training college were built in Soweto. Teachers were given in-service training, and encouraged to upgrade their qualifications by being given study grants.And most importantly, urban blacks were given permanent resident status in South Africa. Before, they had been considered “temporary sojourners” with permanent residence only in the designated homelands, often inferior pieces of land far away from industrial centres and jobs.Like the Apartheid Museum at Johannesburg’s Gold Reef City, this much smaller museum – the first museum in Soweto – has a simplicity which allows the drama of the story to have maximum impact.What became of them?What became of some of the chief protagonists of 16 June 1976?Sam NzimaNzima, who took six sequence shots of 12-year-old Pieterson in those brief moments, left Johannesburg for Limpopo – then the northern Transvaal – about a year later, when it became clear that his safety in the city was under threat. “The security branch phoned me and told me to go to John Vorster Square, but I went into hiding for three weeks,” he says.The harassment didn’t stop after he left the city. “In 1978 the security branch from Nelspruit phoned and told me that they knew of my whereabouts and what I had done.”Nzima set up a bottle store after he settled up north, and later served as a member of parliament in the homeland Gazankulu government. He opened a school of photography in Bushbuckridge after being donated a black and white enlarger by The Sowetan newspaper.“There is an art to developing black and white pictures”, he says.When the Independent Group bought Argus newspapers in 1999, he was given copyright to his Hector photographs.Theuns ‘Rooi Rus’ SwanepoelThe police commander who is believed to have given the command to fire on the schoolchildren on the day, Theuns “Rooi Rus” Swanepoel, was described by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) in 1998 as a policeman “who already had a long history of human rights violations as chief interrogator of the security branch”.Swanepoel told the TRC: “I made my mark. I let it be known to the rioters I would not tolerate what was happening. I used appropriate force. In Soweto and Alexandra where I operated, that broke the back of the organisers.”Die Afrikaner, the far-rightwing Herstigte Nasionale Party mouthpiece, gives the following version of how the first shot was fired in Orlando West: “In the heat of the struggle, (Swanepoel) and his men are called in from leave to stop a mass of seething, threatening youths. The atmosphere is laden and then one of the blacks throws a bottle into the face of the Red Russian (“Rooi Rus”).“A war breaks out as the young men let loose on the seething crowds and the one responsible for throwing the bottle looks like chicken mesh after the automatic machine gun flattens him.”Swanepoel allegedly lost his right eye in the incident. He died of a heart attack in 1998 at the age of 71.Mbuyisa MakhuboMbuyisa Makhubo, the schoolboy who picked up Hector, was harassed by the police after the incident and eventually went into exile. His mother, Nombulelo Makhubo, told the TRC that she received a letter from him from Nigeria in 1978, but that she had not heard from him since. She died in 2004.Antoinette SitholeAntoinette Sithole, Hector’s older sister and one of five sisters, still lives in Soweto. She was 17 in June 1976.“On the day, I was hiding in the second house next to my school Phefeni High School,” Antoinette says. “There were younger children at the march who shouldn’t have been there. I don’t know why they were there – Hector was one of them. There were random shots, we were not familiar with teargas shots. I was confused, those first shots could have been teargas.“I came out of hiding and saw Hector, and I called him to me. He was looking around as I called his name, trying to see who was calling him. I waved at him, he saw me and came over to me. I asked him what he was doing here, we looked around, there was a shot, and I ran back to my hiding place. When I looked out I couldn’t see Hector, I waited, I was afraid, where was he?“Then I saw a group of boys struggling. This gentleman came from nowhere, lifted a body, and I saw the front part of the shoe which I recognised as Hector’s. This man started to run with the body, I ran alongside, and said to him: who are you, this is my brother?“A car stopped in front of us, a lady got out and said she was from the press, and offered us a lift to the clinic. We put him in the car. I don’t remember how I got to the clinic, but the doctor said Hector was dead so I gave his details.“I was so scared of how I was going to tell my mother. Two teachers from a nearby school took me to my grandmother’s house. A neighbour phoned my mother at work, and when she got home at 5.30pm my uncle was standing outside the house with me. She said she had heard on the radio that children had died. My uncle broke the news – she was calm, she showed no emotion.“My father lived in Alexandra – my parents are divorced – he saw the picture in the paper and recognised me and wondered why I wasn’t at school.“My mother’s strength – she was stronger than my father – helped me come to terms with death. I can accept now that we are all going to die.“My mother is still alive and still very strong. She still lives in the same house in Soweto. Hector was her only son, and since the uprising she has lost one of my younger sisters in a car accident.“To me and my family, Hector did not die in vain.”Source: City of JohannesburgWould you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.last_img read more

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Second injury blow for Pakistan, Mohammad Hafeez out of World Cup

first_imgPakistan received yet another injury blow on Sunday when their top-order batsman Mohammad Hafeez was ruled out of World Cup due to an ankle injury. Hafeez is the second player to be ruled out after Junaid Khan failing to recover from a thigh injury had to be replaced by Rahat Ali.Hafeez was recently banned by the ICC from bowling due to suspect bowling action. But he has been able to hold on to his place in the Pakistan line-up as an opener. Hafeez in ODIs has scored 4542 runs at an average of 31.10, which includes nine hundreds and 23 half-centuries.It is learnt that the Pakistan Cricket Board has sent the name of left-handed batsman Nasir Jamshed to the ICC technical committee for inclusion in the World Cup squad as a replacement, as reported by dawn.com on Sunday.On Saturday, ICC cleared offspinner Saeed Ajmal’s bowling action, allowing him to resume bowling in international cricket.last_img read more

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Education Minister Commends School Boards

first_imgMinister of Education, Rev. the Hon. Ronald Thwaites, has commended the “extraordinary voluntarism” of the country’s school board members, noting that they give freely of their time and effort to support principals, teachers and students.“The school boards are the eyes and ears of the Ministry of Education; they are our delegates in the particular school. They are the unsung heroes and heroines, whether at the primary level, the secondary level or at the early childhood level. In the most difficult of situations, they have done so well,” he stated.The Minister was speaking today (April 19), at the launch of a handbook developed by the National Council on Education (NCE) for school boards, at the Kingston and St. Andrew Parish Library on Tom Redcam Drive.He stated that in constituting a school board, it is important to select people, who have the time and the willingness “and the best person who is going to assist the school, and I urge people of faith and goodwill to open themselves for service as school board members.”Minister Thwaites welcomed the NCE manual, noting that it “offers the reference point for the school board members in every aspect of their functioning.”He further commended the NCE members, past and present, who have contributed to the development of the publication.Entitled ‘All Hands on Board’, the manual was developed as part of efforts by the NCE to advance its school board training mandate. The user-friendly reference guide will assist boards of management in undertaking their functions effectively and judiciously.Executive Director, NCE, Merris Murray, said the manual will be distributed to all schools through the regional offices. She informed that it will also be uploaded to the Council’s website at www.nce.org.jm.United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) Representative to Jamaica, Robert Fuderich, who attended the launch, said the handbook is a crucial tool in the child-friendly toolkit to enable school boards to provide the leadership needed.He said it will also ensure that schools achieve the highest standards of academic outcomes and safety, among other things.“It is not enough to have a hunch on how schools should be governed; it is not enough to say ‘I attended a school, so I must know how to manage a school’. But a whole host of skills and knowledge of the system are required to make the school board operate effectively and as a team,” he stated.Principal of Jamaica College, Ruel Reid, endorsed the publication, noting that it will assist in standardising quality within schools, which, ultimately, begins with the board.The book is designed to: ensure compliance with the legal, regulatory and policy framework governing the operation of boards of management of public education institutions; reinforce the role of school boards in advancing the Ministry of Education’s strategic objectives and policy direction; and ensure a common understanding of the role of the board in school administration.It also seeks to heighten the awareness of boards of management, as critical agents of effective schools; ensure coverage of all areas of management key to effective school governance; and provide for consistency in the interpretation and application of all prescriptive and enabling pieces of legislation governing school operation.The book was conceptualised in partnership with the UNICEF.CONTACT: CHRIS PATTERSONlast_img read more

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Honda profit slips on airbag woes despite sales growth

first_imgTOKYO – Honda Motor Co.’s fiscal second quarter profit slipped compared to a year ago as costs related to a massive air-bag recall erased the perks of strong sales, the Japanese automaker said Wednesday.Honda reported its July-September profit totalled 174 billion yen ($1.5 billion), down 1.7 per cent from 177 billion yen a year earlier.Quarterly sales jumped nearly 16 per cent on-year to 3.78 trillion yen ($33 billion), according to the Tokyo-based maker of the Accord compact, Odyssey minivan and Asimo robot.In September, Honda and some people suing the automaker over faulty Takata Corp. air-bag inflators agreed to a $605 million settlement in the U.S.Honda was among Takata’s biggest customers. The defective inflators are linked to 19 deaths and dozens of injuries. Some 100 million air-bag inflators were recalled worldwide.Honda raised its full year forecast through March 2018, to 585 billion yen ($5.1 billion) from 545 billion yen ($4.8 billion) projected earlier, but that’s still 5 per cent lower than what it earned the previous fiscal year.For the latest quarter, a favourable currency rate helped Honda’s bottom line. A weak yen is a plus for giant Japanese exporters like Honda, whose overseas earnings rise in value when converted into yen.The biggest sales growth for Honda is recently being marked in China, where demand is strong for the Civic compact, as well as the UR-V and Avancier sport-utility vehicles.Honda is also banking on electric car sales growth in China, where the government is pushing EVs as a major policy, the company said.Honda’s sales did well in Japan as well, where its N-Box series, a tiny car that looks like a box, was a hit.Its motorcycle sales rose 15 per cent during the quarter compared to the previous year on healthy demand in India, Indonesia and Vietnam, the company said.Honda recently marked a milestone with its Super Cub motorcycle, reaching 100 million units of global production. Super Cub production began in 1958, and the small scooter-like motorcycle is now produced in 15 countries and sold in more than 160 countries.Although the U.S. auto market lagged in recent months, Honda marked solid sales of its new Accord sedan, Civic Hatchback and Acura RDX luxury crossover, doing better than the overall market trend, it said.___Yuri Kageyama can be reached at https://twitter.com/yurikageyamaHer work can be found at https://www.apnews.com/search/yuri%20kageyamalast_img read more

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Tennessees Strange Path to Sweet 16 Suggests Its a Big Threat to

The number next to Tennessee’s name in the NCAA tournament bracket, 11, makes the Volunteers look like heavy underdogs against Michigan on Friday night. How Tennessee got to the Sweet 16 makes it look like a serious upset threat.Teams that are underseeded tend to outplay their seed, as I wrote last week. So do teams that have to play their way into the main tournament bracket, which I wrote about in a separate article. Yet most of these teams still lose their next game, when they face heavy favorites. Tennessee, thanks to a kind draw, is in the small group of teams that were underseeded, had to play their way in, and then won their next game. Similar teams went on to achieve major tournament success.Ken Pomeroy’s ratings on Selection Sunday ranked Tennessee as the 13th best team in the country, worthy of a No. 4 seed. And the Volunteers have played like it since, winning their play-in game over Iowa by 13 points and then crushing UMass and Mercer by 19 and 20, respectively. No other team got to this year’s Sweet 16 with two wins as lopsided as Tennessee’s.The Volunteer’s next opponent, Michigan, is the Midwest’s second seed and reached last year’s championship game. The Wolverines are favored over Tennessee by 2.5 or three points by Las Vegas sports books.But teams like Tennessee have been dangerous at this stage. The Vols — by virtue of beating Iowa and playing their way into the tournament — joined a group that historically outperforms its pre-tournament level by two points per game. Those two points, however, usually aren’t enough against their next, higher-seeded opponents.By beating UMass, Tennessee became just the 33rd play-in winner to win its next round (including in that group teams that had to win games in the early 1980s to advance and face a team that got a bye). How much these teams were underseeded is correlated (R>0.32) with three measures of later success: margin of victory in their next game, subsequent tournament wins and eventual finish. (The last two aren’t redundant because the tournament’s field size and number of rounds have changed.)Underseeded Play-in Winners That Won Their Next GameFive of the 32 teams before Tennessee were underseeded by four or more, according to their pretournament Simple Rating System ranking, as calculated by my colleague Benjamin Morris. (Pomeroy ratings don’t go back to the 1980s.) All five won their next games in the tournament — as Tennessee did against Mercer — and four went to the Final Four, including national finalist UCLA in 1980. No team before Tennessee was underseeded by even six spots; the Vols were slotted seven spots below where they should have been.FiveThirtyEight’s model, which takes into account Pomeroy’s ratings and teams’ performance during the tournament, gives the Vols a 47 percent chance of beating Michigan on Friday. The game is essentially a tossup – a rarity for a matchup between a No. 2 seed and a No. 11. read more

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Sarri Racism is a fight against stupid people

first_imgChelsea boss Maurizio Sarri feels eradicating racism is ‘a fight against stupid people’ after recent allegations against his club and Kalidou Koulibaly’s ordeal.Chelsea fans were heard chanting discriminatory remarks during Chelsea’s 2-1 win at Watford on Boxing Day, just weeks after they came under fire for similar behaviour in matches against Manchester City and Vidi.The incident was then followed by racist taunts to Koulibaly at the San Siro, where Sarri’s former club Napoli lost 1-0 to Inter..@ChelseaFC boss Maurizio Sarri believes his club’s battle to curb racist incidents among their fanbase is a “fight against stupid people” following further allegations of racist chanting by fans during the 2-1 win at Watford on Boxing Day.#PLhttps://t.co/DkWlXmdPxe— Firstpost Sports (@FirstpostSports) December 27, 2018Sacchi explains Sarri, Conte, and Ancelotti Manuel R. Medina – September 14, 2019 Arrigo Sacchi talked about how Sarri has a tougher time at Juventus than Conte at Inter; while Ancelotti’s “blood is boiling” at Napoli.Arrigo Sacchi…“First of all I want to speak with my club, second I don’t want to generalise because 99 percent [of] our fans are really wonderful,” Sarri disclosed in a quote cited by Football Italia“In every community, I think there are some stupids. And so altogether we have to fight against the stupid people but not against the Chelsea fans.”Inter Milan have been officially given a two-game ban for their monkey chants towards the Senegalese defender Kalidou Koulibaly.last_img read more

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Boateng Its a big honour to play for Barca

first_imgKevin-Prince Boateng dubbed his move to Barcelona as a “dream” after the midfielder’s shock loan switch was completed on Monday.Boateng, 31, joined the Catalan side on loan from Serie A side Sassuolo for the rest of the season, with an €8million purchase option included.The former AC Milan and Las Palmas midfielder said it was a dream to get an opportunity to play for Barca.‘It’s an honour to play for Barcelona’ – KP Boateng https://t.co/zdQ3oVTwKM pic.twitter.com/RHI69UTBSZ— SportsAfric (@sports_afric) January 22, 2019FC Barcelona, Valencia CFMatch Preview: Barcelona vs Valencia Boro Tanchev – September 14, 2019 Is derby time in La Liga, as Barcelona welcomes Valencia to the Camp Nou Stadium tonight at 21:00 (CET).“I’m very happy. It’s a big honour to be here and have the possibility to play for this great club,” Boateng told Barca TV and cited on FourFourTwo.“For every kid who starts to play football I think it is a dream to play for a club like Barcelona, so for every player and especially for me it’s a big dream come true.”Boateng only arrived at Sassuolo from Eintracht Frankfurt in July last year, making 15 appearances for the club.📹 INSIDE VIEW👀 @KPBofficial’s first hours in Barcelona ⚽️ #EnjoyPrince 🔵🔴 pic.twitter.com/urV1TzKGTV— FC Barcelona (@FCBarcelona) January 21, 2019last_img read more

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Farming in TCI gets two new experts

first_img ALERT # 2 ON POTENTIAL TROPICAL CYCLONE NINE ISSUED BY THE BAHAMAS DEPARTMENT OF METEOROLOGY THURSDAY 12TH SEPTEMBER, 2019 AT 9 PM EDT Recommended for you Electricity Cost of Service Study among the big agenda items at September 11 Cabinet meeting Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppProvidenciales, TCI, February 23, 2017 – The Turks and Caicos finally has a farm manager, and it heralds the transformation of the Government farm in North Caicos into a research and demonstration farm.  The announcement of two new and experienced staff came from the Department of Agriculture earlier this month and Director Wilhelmina Kissoonsingh counts it a critical step for the islands.“The Turks and Caicos Islands imports almost all its food, which puts the country at a food security risk.   However the potential is there to develop the agriculture sector with new and innovative techniques to produce food in a sustainable way.”The Director explained that the Extension Officer is to work with farmers, schools and interested persons to advise on farming practices, assist in diagnosing problems like pests and diseases and education on new technologies in agriculture.The Farm Manager will support the schools with the reformatted farm; hands on training in agriculture was cited as among the experiences for students. Mario Smith is the new extension officer, while Eulitt Pinnock is the Farm Manager.#MagneticMediaNews Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Related Items:#magneticmedianews The Luxury of Grace Bay in Down Town Provolast_img read more

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Redknapp tips Liverpool to win at Bournemouth

first_imgFormer Liverpool player Jamie Redknapp has tipped them for victory against Bournemouth on Saturday even though “they haven’t been playing at their brilliant best” this season.Liverpool have been widely considered as a serious title contender by fans and pundits alike as they currently trail Manchester City by two points, but Redknapp believes their best is yet to come this season.“Liverpool have suffered their own injury setback, with Joe Gomez ruled out after fracturing his leg,” Redknapp wrote on Sky Sports.divock origi, liverpoolReport: Origi cause Klopp injury concerns George Patchias – September 14, 2019 Divock Origi injury in today’s game against Newcastle is a cause for concern for Jurgen Klopp.Perhaps with one eye on Tuesday’s trip to Italy…“He had been performing so well alongside Virgil van Dijk and with Dejan Lovren absent due to concussion, Bournemouth may sense an opportunity there.“Of course, Liverpool won their games against Bournemouth comfortably last season, 4-0 and 3-0, but while they haven’t been playing at their brilliant best yet this season they’ve been able to win games they struggled in last season, such as the midweek trip to Burnley.“I expect them to edge this one, too – but Bournemouth can’t be underestimated this season.”last_img read more

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Ramos Only physicality and intensity prevail in football

first_imgReal Madrid captain Sergio Ramos refuses to take Al Ain lightly ahead of this evening’s Club World Cup finalFollowing Wednesday’s 3-1 win against Japanese side Kashima Antlers, Real will now take on local team Al Ain.The European champions are gunning for a third World Cup in a row and are considered the strong favourites.But Ramos knows all too well that in football anything can happen and, therefore, intends to stay on guard as Real attempt to make more history today.“We’ve got another chance to retain the Club World Cup,” said Ramos on the club website.Sergio Ramos, Real MadridZidane reveals Sergio Ramos injury concern for Real Madrid Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Zinedine Zidane has put Sergio Ramos’ availability for Real Madrid’s trip to Sevilla next weekend in doubt after withdrawing him against Levante.“No club has won it three years in a row and we’re really looking forward to the final and are hoping to take the trophy home before going on holiday”“We’re really looking forward to the game and we have the utmost respect for the opponent, River were favourites, but we saw that the badge alone doesn’t win you anything.“Physicality and intensity prevail in football. We know that they have the swede up top, the Brazilian on the left or the Egyptian in the midfield.“Football is much more even these days and we’ll go out knowing that it will be a very difficult match”.The World Cup final between Real and Al Ain will take place at the Zayed Sports City Stadium with kick-off set for 17:30 (CET).last_img read more

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