SGH to Partner with Dogliotti, Others

first_imgPresident Ellen Johnson Sirleaf has called on Seed Global Health (SGH) to enter into an arrangement with the A.M. Dogliotti College of Medicine at the University of Liberia (UL) and other medical training institutions in the country to train medical practitioners who will improve health services in the country. SGH is a United States based organization that seeks to strengthen health education in countries, such as Liberia, challenged by a shortage of health professionals. SGH had earlier expressed interest in working with Liberia.SGH leadership over the weekend disclosed its intention to work with the Liberian government when a four-member delegation led by its Chief Executive Officer (CEO), Dr. Vanessa Kerry, paid a courtesy call on the President in Monrovia.President Sirleaf said her administration welcomes the partnership and cooperation with SGH to enhance the country’s healthcare delivery capacities. She underscored the compelling need to provide training for doctors, physicians, nurses as well as mid-wives, adding, “The progress we desire to make must be the best quality to achieve lasting and impressive results.” She said SGH’s intervention in Liberia’s health sector, through the deployment of experienced medical volunteers in partnership with U.S. Peace Corps would tremendously impact the building of a resilient health system in Liberia.The President also encouraged SGH to explore cooperation in the water and sanitation sector, particularly working with schools to ensure facilities are established and sustainably maintained for the good of the students.Dr. Vanessa Kerry said her organization will work with Liberia to help meet its long-term health care and human resource needs. This, she noted, would be done through the Global Health Service Partnership (GHSP) initiative. GHSP is a public-private collaboration between SGH, the Peace Corps and the US President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR). The SGH, Dr. Kerry said, brings a rich experience and knowledge of medical and nursing education to resource limited settings. “We provide expertise in site selection and applicant recruitment in addition to coordinating orientation and training, field support, monitoring and evaluation, and debt repayment stipends with expertise to identify effective teaching sites,” Dr. Kerry said.Dr. Kerry, whose team had been in the country working with the Ministry of Health in areas that require quick interventions, expressed gratitude to President Sirleaf for the audience. While in the country, the SGH team visited the Phebe Hospital in Bong County, Cuttington University in Suakoko, J.F.K. Medical Center, the Tubman National Institute for Medical Arts (TNIMA), as well as the Mother Patern College of Health Sciences.Meanwhile, USA Peace Corps Africa Regional Director, Dick Day, has praised the authorities at the Ministry of Health for the kind of structures already in place, which he said are vital for assisting partners interested in making critical interventions in the heath sector. Mr. Day, U.S. Chargé d’Affaires Mark Boulware and Peace Corps Liberia Director Kevin Fleming accompanied Dr. Vanessa Kerry.Established in 2012, the GHSP program is a novel federal initiative addressing vast shortages of health professionals in many parts of the world.The GHSP commits to helping increase clinical care capacities and strengthening health systems in resource-limited settings by cultivating the next generation of local doctors and nurses. The program places US health professionals alongside local medical and nursing faculty counterparts to meet the teaching needs identified at each partner institution.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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LAUSD takeover bill stalls

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREWhy these photogenic dumplings are popping up in Los AngelesMost, if not all, Republicans are expected to vote against the bill, meaning it will most likely need 21 of the 25 Democrats to pass the Senate on a simple majority. If it passes the Senate, it will still need to go through the Assembly before the legislative session ends next Thursday. Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger has said he will sign the legislation if it reaches his desk. Several Democratic members said their main concern was that they had not had time to read the bill. Although there have been several public hearings and extensive media coverage, the bill was printed in its final form only Wednesday. They also said they had not had a chance to fully discuss the bill in a Democratic caucus meeting. Opponents said the delay appeared to be a sign of weakness, and an indication that the bill was being rushed through the Legislature under significant political pressure without a thorough vetting. “I don’t know that the members have had a chance to read it or understand it,” said Los Angeles Unified School District board President Marlene Canter. “And there’s so much political pressure on them, it’s become just a political conversation.” Sen. Dean Florez, D-Bakersfield, plans to vote against the bill. Florez said many of his fellow Democrats have felt pressure from Democratic leadership to support the bill against their better judgment, and some are hoping not to anger the influential and popular Villaraigosa, who is seen as a future gubernatorial candidate. “It’s like `American Idol’ politics,” Florez said. “Everybody’s being moved by who our favorite contestant is. I don’t think we should vote on this just because we want to be somebody’s friend.” He opposes the bill, he said, because he does not believe it will help LAUSD students and it doesn’t have adequate educational or funding plans. He also thinks it will set a bad precedent for other mayors seeking similar powers. Florez also noted that Fresno Mayor Alan Autry, a Republican, asked the Legislature for similar control over his schools a year ago, and was quickly rejected. He said if it was any mayor except Villaraigosa, especially a Republican, the proposal would already have been been shot down. The legislation, Assembly Bill 1381 co-authored by Assembly Speaker Fabian Nu¤ez, D-Los Angeles, and Sen. Gloria Romero, D-Los Angeles, would create a council of mayors that would ratify the hiring of an LAUSD superintendent. The bill would also create a mayor’s community partnership to oversee the lowest-performing schools in the district. It would also strengthen the superintendent while decreasing the school board’s role in the daily management of the district. Romero said she already believes she has the 21 votes she needs. “Some members wanted to have some extra time to read it, but those would be votes that would be gravy to the roll call,” Romero said. “But as far as the votes that we need to move this out, they are there, they’re solid.” Sen. George Runner, R-Lancaster, has been working to rally Republican opposition and predicted that no GOP members would support it in the Senate. Runner has been particularly critical of a provision in the bill called a “severability clause” under which if a court strikes down one portion, the rest remains standing. Runner argues that the provision would leave in place the least desirable elements of the bill that were the results of compromises with the teachers unions. He had been negotiating with the bill’s authors to try to remove that clause, but when those talks failed, he moved to insert an “inseverability clause.” Several Republicans who were undecided or considering supporting the bill now appear to have moved into the opposition column. Sen. Chuck Poochigian, R-Fresno, had abstained from voting on the bill in the Senate Appropriations Committee because he had not made up his mind. But Thursday he said he was leaning against it. “I have tried to be open-minded in this whole process, and that accounts for my forbearance in the last committee,” Poochigian said. “I wanted to work through it and get a better feel for how it would work. It seems the more we learn, the more questions are raised.” It was the second time in recent months that the mayor’s plan has been in danger. In June, under an aggressive onslaught of lobbying by union and school board opponents, Nu¤ez was so concerned that he called the mayor and urged him to return to Sacramento to prop up the effort. Villaraigosa’s staff quickly put together a trip and he met with lawmakers. He salvaged his effort, but only by abandoning his bid for full control of the LAUSD. Instead, he cut a deal with the teachers unions that would give him greater say, but that falls short of the reform he had sought for the nation’s second-largest school district. Also Thursday, at Los Angeles City Hall, two small groups of parents on opposite sides of the issue staged competing marches. Staff Writers Rick Orlov and Naush Boghossian contributed to this report. harrison.sheppard@dailynews.com (916) 446-6723160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! SACRAMENTO – Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa’s school-takeover legislation hit a wall of resistance Thursday and supporters called off a Senate vote as they scrambled to muster support. Critics seized on the delay as a sign of faltering support while the mayor’s backers downplayed the situation as nothing more than some lawmakers needing more time to digest the controversial legislation. Senate President Pro Tem Don Perata, D-Oakland, admitted he could not muster enough votes to get the bill out of his house, saying several Democratic members had voiced questions or concerns. But he predicted that the votes would be lined up by Monday and it would win approval and move back to the Assembly for final passage. “It was not ready,” Perata said. “(Several legislators) had general questions with the bill and they wanted to get some answers. Rather than keeping everybody here until midnight, which would have no purpose, we’ll just take it up Monday.” last_img
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Heusinkveld Earns Indoor Track GPAC Honor

first_imgSioux City, Iowa – The Great Plains Athletic Conference (GPAC) and Hauff Mid-America Sports are proud to announce the following women’s indoor track & field athletes-of-the-week for events held Dec. 2-8, 2019. Hauff Mid-America Sports is the presenting sponsor of the 2019-2020 GPAC Players-of-the-Week and Players and Coaches-of-the-Year awards program. Hauff Mid-America Sports/GPAC Women’s Indoor Track & Field Athletes-of-the-WeekTrack Events – Anna Heusinkveld, Northwestern CollegeAnna Heusinkveld of Northwestern is this week’s track athlete-of-the-week. Heusinkveld, a senior from Springfield, South Dakota, won two events in her season debut at the Buena Vista Early Bird meet. She won both the 60m and 200m, setting the meet record with a time of 26.91 in the 200m. Her winning time was 8.02 in the 60m finals, bettering her prelim time of 8.09. Heusinkveld has the fastest time in the GPAC in the 200 and second fastest time in the 60.last_img read more

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