Greenland calls for more targeted athlete endorsements

first_imgSenior Vice President of Operations and Marketing at GraceKennedy Money Services, Noel Greenland, has said that brands and athletes who endorse them, should put more focus on selling their products in what he describes as a “unique way.” Greenland was speaking at the Regional Conference On The Strategic Use of Intellectual Property In Sport, yesterday. He said that he has noticed that brands are failing to effectively make an imprint on the minds of consumers because their marketing strategies are not memorable enough. He said that many brands are too focused on just getting star athletes aligned with their products, rather than choosing athletes who have relevance to what they are trying to market. “When a talent (athlete) is overexposed to the point where that talent is used on multiple products, it doesn’t bring the same weight,” Greenland said. “To the consumers it’s almost like ‘Oh, that’s just another ad.’ He mentioned that many television viewers do not even watch many commercials during programme breaks because of this, and advertisers lose money as a result, because of how much they have spent to produce these commercials. “I don’t like those types of sponsorship,” he said. “Your message is invariably lost after a week or two.” Greenland said that in order to establish what he calls a “perfect brand,” advertisers need to figure out their target audience. “It will not come because the athlete is the fastest in the world, or because the athlete is the best looking athlete, or the best shaped body. “The test should be ‘Who am I targeting best?’ I believe if we sell the right product to the right demographic, that demographic will use that product well. I would want to use talent that can appeal and speak a language that the audience will be enticed by.” The conference took place over two days at the Jamaica Conference Centre in downtown Kingston and featured presentations on the protection of copyright on the Internet, broadcasting and media rights and sports, broadcast piracy, digital media, infringement of rights relating to sports, use of athletes as brand ambassadors, and strategies to develop sponsorship, merchandising and trade related to sports intellectual property. Olympian Veronica Campbell Brown spoke about athletes including herself, recognising that their career is their business. “Veronica Campbell-Brown is not just a name but also a brand that my team and I had to protect and enhance by our actions,” she said. “At the end of the day, it was my sole responsibility to be responsible in the way I approach training sessions, competitions, and my conduct on and off the track. This enabled my team to better assist carrying out my vision and help me gain success. Winning medals led to higher fees, respect and more exposure.” Sprint icon Asafa Powell made several presentations to Sport minister Olivia Grange. One of these was his training jacket and running shorts from the London Olympics for the Jamaica 55 Anniversary time capsule. His running spikes from the same Games were contributed to the National Sport Museum and he also presented Grange with products from his new line of deodorants and training bands. He said that some of the proceeds from the merchandise will go towards breast and prostate cancer research.last_img read more

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Ron Goldman’s father sues O.J. Simpson

first_imgINDIANAPOLIS (AP) – Ronald Goldman’s father sued O.J. Simpson on Tuesday, seeking any money the former NFL star received for a canceled book deal and TV interview that told a hypothetical tale of how he would have killed his ex-wife and Goldman. The federal lawsuit filed in California by Fred Goldman’s Indianapolis-based attorney accuses Simpson of “fraudulent conveyance” and alleges that he created a shell corporation that received at least $1.1 million as part of the TV interview and book, titled “If I Did It.” Attorney Jonathan Polak said Lorraine Brooke Associates was created in March using the middle name of Simpson’s two children. The lawsuit calls it a “sham entity” formed to defraud Ron Goldman’s relatives by preventing them from claiming any of more than $38 million Simpson owes the family from a judgment against him in a wrongful death lawsuit. Goldman’s lawsuit seeks about $1.1 million plus punitive damages, although Polak said he believed Simpson has already spent the money he received from News Corp., the owner of Fox Broadcasting and publisher HarperCollins. Polak said the lawsuit’s true aim is to determine how the book and TV interview deals were reached. “The question in this lawsuit is not about what’s in their bank account right now,” he said. “The issue is, can we unwind this series of transactions and hold those we believe truly are responsible accountable financially?” Polak said he believes Judith Regan – who was fired last week as a publisher by HarperCollins – and Rupert Murdoch, owner of News Corp., need “to come clean” on their knowledge of how Simpson was reimbursed for the deal. Andrew Butcher, a News Corp. spokesman, said he could not comment on the possibility of Murdoch being deposed. He said News Corp. has been working with Goldman’s family to answer questions about the book deal. “From the very start, we’d offered every assistance to the family of Ron Goldman. Any information they have asked for regarding the contracts for the Simpson book, we have given them,” Butcher said. Polak said he has asked News Corp. to destroy all copies of the book, as well as copies of the interview with Fox that was to have aired. He also wants News Corp. to assign all rights to those books and interviews to the Goldman family. Butcher said News Corp. has destroyed all copies of “If I Did It” but objected to the request to assign the rights to the Goldmans. “You don’t own the rights to someone’s book in perpetuity,” he said. “It doesn’t work that way. It’s more complicated.” Simpson told The Associated Press last month that he took part in the project solely for personal profit and acknowledged that any financial gain was “blood money.” Simpson would not say how much he was paid in advance, only that it was less than the $3.5 million reported. He said the money already has been spent, some of it on tax obligations. Messages seeking comment were left Tuesday with Simpson’s attorney, Yale Galanter. Simpson was acquitted of criminal charges in the 1994 killings. In 1997, a civil court jury, using a lesser standard of proof than is required at a criminal trial, found Simpson liable for Nicole Brown Simpson’s and Goldman’s stabbing deaths. The jury ordered him to pay about $19.7 million to Goldman’s family – an amount Polak said has grown to more than $38 million with interest. Fred Goldman said in a statement that he was eager to learn who worked with Simpson on the deal. “We will not stop until we are able to shine the light of truth on those that acted in concert with him,” he said. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREWhicker: John Jackson greets a Christmas that he wasn’t sure he’d see160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

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