Kelly’s proud to be miles ahead with Circle K rebrand

first_imgKelly’s Forecourt at Mountain Top Letterkenny has had a shiny new rebrand to join the global Circle K network.As well as a new-look canopy, the former Topaz petrol station offers customers exciting benefits to customers. The people, the service and the award-winning Centra store remain the same. All that has changed is the Circle K forecourt.Kelly’s of Mountain Top rebranded to Circle KKelly’s pumps are continuing to supply the same fuel that takes you miles further. Miles by Circle K is the new and improved quality fuel that reduces the cost of fuel by up to 3%.Miles saves you up to 4c per litre. The fuel contains unique additives to help clean the engine, so your car will thank you too!Miles fuels benefits:Improve fuel consumption – takes you up to 3% furtherClean and protect your engineEnhance engine efficiency and improve reliabilityReduce harmful exhaust emissions Many of Kelly’s loyal customers will be wondering about their Topaz fuel cards. The good news is that the existing Topaz fuel card is accepted at all Circle K locations in Ireland. It will also be accepted at Topaz locations during the rebrand. Gradually, new Circle K branded fuel cards are due to be introduced.The team at Kelly’s are looking forward to welcoming customers to their new-look forecourt this season.This move is the latest in exciting developments at Kelly’s. The Centra store recently held a Customer Appreciation Day to celebrate their innovative store and customer service, while the popular Kelly’s Diner continues to impress with their tasty food offers and stylish designed venue.Call up to Kelly’s at Mountain Top to refuel, restock and relax!Sponsored PostKelly’s proud to be miles ahead with Circle K rebrand was last modified: September 12th, 2018 by Staff WriterShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:circle kkelly’s mountain topletterkennypetrolservice stationlast_img read more

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Eye Tracking for Business Success Demo

first_imgIf you’re interested in learning about eye tracking and are in the downtown Detroit area next Tuesday, January 14 between 9:00am and 10:30am, drop by the Compuware Building for a demo and chance to try out an eye tracker.Jon West, director of marketing and opportunities for LC Technologies, will be available to demo their eye tracking equipment and answer your questions. This is a great opportunity to observe as well as use the equipment. I’m not sure what equipment Jon will be using to demo eye tracking next week, but here’s a demo of LC Technologies NYAN 2.0 product: If you’re not familiar with eye tracking, it’s the process of of measuring where someone is looking, including the point of gaze (where someone is looking) and the motion of the eye. From the event announcement:Eye trackers have come of age and have grown to be an extremely usable, reliable, and popular complement in the data collection and analysis of market research, usability testing, and other activities that test and predict consumer and customer behavior, and that facilitate the design of products that range from software to websites to mobile apps to automobile controls and displays to assistance for people with disabilities.The demo will be held at the Airea Studio, located next to the waterfall and Texas de Brazil restaurant on the ground floor of the Compuware Building. Additional info can be found on the event page.Thanks to my friend Dave Mitropoulos-Rundus for organizing this drop-in event. If you want to learn more about the future of eye tracking, be sure to register for Jon’s presentation the evening of January 14, Beyond the Heat Map: The Future of Eye Tracking, hosted by the Michigan Usability Professionals’ Association/Michigan Computer Human Interaction groups at Cengage Learning. Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Like this:Like Loading…RelatedTakeaways from Demystifying Eye Tracking for UX ResearchAt today’s User Experience Professionals Association webinar, Laura Rivera shared her lessons learned from eye tracking research. Rivera is a user experience (UX) researcher at Facebook and has been instrumental in getting their eye tracking capabilities fine-tuned for mobile. Here are my takeaways from her presentation. Why You Should Use…In “User experience”January 2014 Web Professional and User Experience EventsLast September I started publishing a monthly user experience and web professionals events calendar for southeastern Michigan. I admit I didn’t keep up with posting the calendar each month. So, it’s a new year. With plans to do better in 2014, here’s the January calendar of events in southeastern Michigan:…In “Calendar”January 10, 2014: Weekly Roundup of Web Design and Development ResourcesThankfully, the snowstorm and deep freeze in southeastern Michigan is finally over. We had so much snow in our area I had to change from a ruler to a yardstick to measure it. Hope you made it through the first full week of the New Year without any issues. In…In “Web design & development links”last_img read more

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What is The Future of Human Powered Search?

first_imgRelated Posts Mahalo popularized the term “human powered search” when they launched just over a year ago. Many of the pitches we get still use that term as part of their positioning. Many of them are bootstrapped, so the price of entry is clearly low. But the upside has not yet been established. In this post we look at the pros and cons of human powered search engines in general, look at some differentiating strategies and ask “what is the future for Human Powered Search?”Old Wine In New Bottles?When Mahalo first launched, my instinctive reaction (which I recorded on my personal Blog) was that this was “old wine in new bottles”. Traditional publishers have been doing “human powered search” even BI (Before Internet) but these went by boring names like Directory. Human editors work great in well defined niches, always have done and always will. Human editors produce the expert content that Google finds for you. This is long tail publishing. This is Business Media and Enthusiast Media, large but slow growth traditional publishing segments of the media industry.But an Internet scale venture powered by humans rather than software? We look at three reasons why this might work and two reasons why it won’t work.Three Pros And Two ConsMost ventures in this space highlight three things that a human editor can always do better than a software program. These are the three Pros:1. Spam control. Humans can easily spot even the most ingenious spam .2. Duplicate control. 10 articles that all say virtually the same thing are just a waste of time.3. Disambiguation. Computers need an awful lot of expensive programming to always spot the difference between “apple” as a fruit, a consumer electronics company or a record label. Humans can do it in a flash.The two Cons:1. You cannot persuade people to break their Google habit until your searches are better than Google for most cases (not just the few cases where you specialize). This massive hurdle is true for all search engines.2. You cannot win as a destination site if you are general purpose. You go to the sites that specialize in the areas that interest you. If you don’t know what sites to go to, Google will find those sites for you.So, do three Pros beat two Cons? Not in this case. The Pros are three relatively minor irritants that human powered search fixes. The Cons are total showstoppers.Pay People To Write Content?Mahalo pays people to create content. That means they can predict the quality of the results. Paying people requires lots of funding. Mahalo has plenty of funding and it is unlikely anybody else will get funded with the same model. So Mahalo has a fairly long and clear runway before take-off. Mahalo is private company so we don’t know how long it will take them to get to profitability or even if the basic economics make profitability feasible at all. In today’s climate, nobody will buy Mahalo without a clear path to profitability.Are you Bullish or Bearish on Mahalo? Cast your vote in our Company Index (powered by TradeVibes). My vote was Bearish and I was in the majority at the time I cast my vote (80% Bullish vs 20% Bearish). The sample size on that vote was too low to be meaningful (40), so the more votes the better.The Elephant In The Community Generated Content RoomMost other ventures get “the community” to create the content. The elephant in this room is of course Wikipedia. How on earth do you get general knowledge content that is better at scale than Wikipedia? How do you motivate people to create content if, unlike Mahalo, you are not paying their salaries? Google’s answer with Knol was to pay them indirectly via Adsense revenue. The market jury on Knol is still out. If Google cannot win, how can any other start-up without their brand power? If the Knol competitor also monetizes through Adsense, their margin is even less.About The PlayersThe other well funded venture that wears the human powered search label is Wikia. Founded by Jimmy Wales of Wikipedia fame, this looks like the largest pure Wiki style venture. Content is community generated, but it appears that they have editors/moderators/curators on payroll.Squidoo looks like a bootstrapped venture. It is hard to tell if it has traction. Looking at Squidoo’s page on TradeVibes will point to many other inexpensive Wiki style ventures. The basic technology of Wikis is now a total commodity.One of the earliest ventures, About.com, is now owned by the New York Times. On my survey of one, About is the one site other than Wikipedia that surfaces a lot in general knowledge type searches. At the scale they operate, it may well be profitable. So Mahalo, Wiki and other human powered search engines may have a bright future.What do you think? Can general purpose human powered search engines scale and make money? Or will they either fail or move into small niches? What new ventures have a fundamentally differentiated approach to this market? bernard lunn Tags:#NYT#Trends#web A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai…center_img 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic…last_img read more

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Analysis: Adobe Had to Cut Its Losses With Mobile Flash

first_imgIt isn’t easy to make the case that a product and a technology are mutually dependent and inseparable, in the same paragraph with a statement that you’re going to be separating them for the benefit of both. This afternoon, Adobe is giving it one heck of a try, in a blog post that fully confirms what my friend and colleague at ZDNet, Jason Perlow, first reported at midnight last night: Adobe is parting ways with Flash Player for mobile devices, in the first move of what could eventually spell complete obsolescence for the venerable plug-in.The new euphemism for bad news from a vendor is a “conversation.” Adobe confirmed Perlow’s report this afternoon with a statement that attempted to draw a picture of the company having a little tete-a-tete with Apple, Microsoft, Google (perhaps the future parent of Motorola), and RIM, and coming to the realization that plug-ins for mobile are about to be shut out.Cutting Flash’s lifeline to save the runtime“HTML5 is now universally supported on major mobile devices, in some cases exclusively,” reads today’s post from Adobe Vice President and General Manager Danny Winokur. “This makes HTML5 the best solution for creating and deploying content in the browser across mobile platforms. We are excited about this, and will continue our work with key players in the HTML community, including Google, Apple, Microsoft and RIM, to drive HTML5 innovation they can use to advance their mobile browsers.”From this point forward, Winokur went on, Adobe will be concentrating its efforts on promoting and advancing the AIR runtime platform for mobile apps. AIR had been Adobe’s way of keeping Flash’s foot in the door while enabling its ActionScript developers to move toward an HTML5 mindset.But Flash has tried to maintain a position as both a provider of functionality – which is also the typical role of a runtime library – and as a multimedia front end for handling multiple codecs, including H.264. With a new wave of systems-on-a-chip in current and future smartphones and tablets that have H.264 and other codecs’ processing built-in, in the future, there isn’t much room for Flash in software that won’t be covered by codecs in hardware. If Adobe were to have kept its functionality eggs in Flash’s basket, then its play for the mobile HTML5 market might have been jeopardized.Microsoft may already have come to this same conclusion a few months ago with respect to its Silverlight portable runtime. Like Flash, it provides functionality (a portion of the .NET Framework) and multimedia processing, though Microsoft has already announced it’s moving the emphasis of its Windows 8 development toward a new programming model based on HTML5.Runtime libraries – especially proprietary ones – based on HTML5 are plentiful and growing. Every major player with an investment in HTML5 (including Microsoft, Apple, Google, Facebook, and still Adobe) is advancing some kind of library or functionality native to its system or software, which HTML5 would access in a standard way but which would then take over in a very non-standard one.Hilwa: Right move for AdobeIDC analyst Al Hilwa, who runs its Application Software Development program, shared his opinion with RWW this afternoon that Adobe is making the smart move now by cutting its losses in mobile. “By 2013, we will reach a point where 90% of smartphones and tablets will sport HTML5 capable browsers,” he writes us. “In this light, having a large cadre of staff working on putting Flash on every mobile device on the planet appears to be unnecessary and an unwise use of resources. Adobe is smart to let go, though it is leaving the choice in hardware makers’ hands as to delivering future updates to the Flash browser plugin beyond version 11.1.”However, Hilwa went on, Adobe must remain careful to maintain enough distinctions between mobile and desktop platforms, if it intends to sustain its stronghold on the desktop until HTML5 on the desktop matures – which he believes won’t happen until at least 2015. Hilwa then went on to disagree with RWW’s Marshall Kirkpatrick’s assessment late last night of Adobe’s move as a win for the policies of the late Steve Jobs.“While this has been portrayed as a win for Steve Jobs, in truth picking on Adobe was not this giant’s finest hour,” writes Hilwa. “The sun-setting of mobile Flash R&D is only related to Steve Jobs in the broad sense that he instigated the smartphone revolution with the iPhone. Flash survives intact in the AIR runtime and the Adobe tool chain which will already supports the broader Web ecosystem including HTML5. Adobe’s investment in HTML5 has already given it a lead role in the tools ecosystem for the Web. While Flash ends for mobile devices at some point, the added investment in HTML5 should make Adobe stronger. Overall, developers will continue to be served.”Developers won’t be the only ones served, at least with notices. Today, the company told investolast_img read more

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Weekly Report from Washington, D.C.

first_imgThe Weekly Report from Washington, D.C. for November 13, rounds up the latest on the tax legislation moving through Congress and IRS Commissioner John Koskinen’s last days on the job. Pending tax legislation moved forward in the House after the Ways and Means Committee approved the GOP tax bill. The Senate GOP unveiled its tax reform plan. IRS Commissioner John Koskinen left office on November 12.CongressHouse. The House Ways and Means Committee approved the GOP’s amended Tax Cuts and Jobs Bill (HR 1), along party lines on November 9. A floor vote on the bill is expected during the week of November 13.Senate. Senate Republicans unveiled a tax reform plan on November 9. The Senate Finance Committee is expected to begin a mark-up of the GOP plan during the week of November 13. IRSIRS Commissioner. John Koskinen highlighted his service as IRS commissioner during a press conference in Washington, D.C. Koskinen’s last day as commissioner was November 12 .Disaster Relief. The IRS provided guidance on leave-based donation programs to aid victims of recent wildfires in California. Under these programs, employees forgo their vacation, sick or personal leave in exchange for cash payments the employer makes to charitable organizations providing relief for the victims of this disaster.Cybersecurity. The IRS Office of Professional Responsibility (OPR) is asking how cybersecurity concerns could impact professional responsibility, OPR Director Stephen A. Whitlock said on November 8. Whitlock spoke at the AICPA Fall Tax Division Meeting in Washington, D.C.Filing Season. The IRS released the first in a series of reminders to help taxpayers get ready for the upcoming tax filing season. The IRS gave tips to encourage problem-free filing of returns .By Jessica Jeane, George Jones and George L. Yaksick, Jr., Wolters Kluwer News StaffNeed to know more? Join Wolters Kluwer Principal Analyst Mark Luscombe on  Nov. 29 for Tax Legislation Update: Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, a 2 CPE webinar from CCH® CPElink. Mark will discuss what you need to know about the proposed legislation and its impact on businesses and individuals. Link is: http://www.cpelink.com/product/detail/?p=12149&t_id=1039&t_ref=3&s=r53bz8fLogin to read more tax news on CCH® AnswerConnect or CCH® Intelliconnect®.Not a subscriber? Sign up for a free trial or contact us for a representative.last_img read more

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Plastic makes up nearly 70% of all ocean litter

first_imgPlastic makes up nearly 70% of all ocean litter By Katherine KorneiApr. 4, 2017 , 11:00 AM Every day, humans generate millions of tons of garbage. And although a lot of that litter ends up in landfills, some enters the ocean by accident or through illegal dumping. Now, researchers have compiled a new database that reveals just how widespread ocean litter is, from the infamous “garbage patches” of the North Pacific to piles of trash on beaches around the world and in the deep ocean. LITTERBASE, and its accompanying maps, together draw on data from more than a thousand studies from 1960 to 2017. The most polluted spots, which host more than 10 billion pieces of litter per square kilometer, include beaches and patches of sea off the coasts of South Korea and Jordan. Most of that litter—close to 70%—is plastics, with metal and glass contributing to the remainder. And microplastics, shards of plastic smaller than 5 millimeters, are particularly prevalent. That’s because large pieces of litter break down in sunlight and ocean currents. All of our litter means that life under the sea isn’t easy: The database also reveals that more than 1200 aquatic species—mammals, fish, crustaceans, and others—are coming into contact with the litter by eating it, living in it, or becoming entangled.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)last_img read more

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