SA to fund major DRC projects

first_img23 August 2007South Africa has agreed to help finance several major infrastructure projects in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), including the construction of a new terminal at Kinshasa’s N’Djili International Airport and a deep sea port at Banana on the Atlantic coast.South Africa has also agreed to provide funds for the rehabilitation and modernization of the Inga Hydro-electric Dam, one of the biggest projects to be implemented under the New Partnership for Africa’s Development (Nepad).This emerged after the fourth session of the South Africa-DRC Binational Commission, co-chaired by South African President Thabo Mbeki and DRC President Joseph Kabila in Kinshasa on Tuesday.According to the DRC’s foreign ministry, Mbeki and Kabila conducted a review of existing co-operation agreements between the two countries, and signed new agreements in the fields of health and transport.Areas covered by the existing SA-DRC agreements include telecommunications, mining and energy, infrastructure development and tourism.South Africa Department of Foreign Affairs spokesman Vincent Hlongwane told BuaNews that the new agreement on transport dealt mainly with how South Africa could help the DRC improve its airports and roads infrastructure.“In terms of health, it is about collaboration in immunisation programmes and the secondment of some health officials, because the DRC has a malaria problem and South Africa has expertise in dealing with that,” Hlongwane said.South Africa has been heavily involved in post-conflict reconstruction and development in the DRC, after being one of the key players in facilitating the DRC’s first democratic elections in July 2006.South African organisations printed the ballots for the elections, distributed them across the vast, resource-rich nation and gave IT support during the counting process.South Africa also has a peacekeeping contingent serving under the United Nations Mission in the DRC.During President Kabila’s state visit to South Africa in June, both he and Mbeki pledged to strengthen the links between the two countries even further.Source: BuaNewslast_img read more

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Google Launches Starter Kit For A More Consistent Web

first_imgWhy You Love Online Quizzes Tags:#Android#App Design#Browsers#Chrome#design#Google#Web Apps#Web design#Web Development Growing Phone Scams: 5 Tips To Avoid lauren orsini How to Write a Welcome Email to New Employees?center_img 7 Types of Video that will Make a Massive Impac… Today Google launched Web Starter Kit, a download that consists of all the templates and tooling developers need to create sites that function on any device and any display.  Today’s Internet users don’t have just one device. They prefer as physical keyboard for their PCs but they want as touch screens on mobile. These days, no two screen sizes are alike. Users expect the same website to perform differently depending on the device by which it is accessed. Since these features don’t come built in to new websites, developers have to put them there, over and over again. This is referred to as “boilerplate,” chunks of essential code that needs to be manually inserted before any creative work can be done on a website. Google’s Web Starter Kit provides much of that boilerplate as downloadable content, so developers can speed up their projects and get site building. In its introduction to the kit, Google divides the workflow in to three functions: developers can pick a template, build the site and test it out.The Web Starter Kit builds off of a previous Google effort, Web Fundamentals. This earlier effort informed developers about best practices for building accessible websites while harnessing the most modern technology possible. If you’ve been following previous Web development best practices, you’ll find these tools build on the fundamentals you’ve already adopted. The kit is designed to not just create attractive websites across Internet connected devices uses Google Chrome, but all browsers. That’s because it’s based on the Web standards provided by the W3 Coalition to make the Web accessible. Google is not launching its Web Starter Kit into an empty market. Many developers have already adopted Bootstrap, a similar framework for building cross-platform websites. However, Google engineer Addy Osmani said on Hacker News that Google doesn’t plan to compete with Bootstrap in terms of user interface components, of which it has notably less.Google’s Web Starter Kit may tie into some new design concepts coming from Google in the coming weeks and months, including the expansion of its Polymer Web design principles it announced at Google I/O 2013 and the rumored Google Quantum Paper project for Android design.Bootstrap, Foundation and other existing boilerplate kits have very distinctive looks. If you’ve used them you can start to recognize patterns all over the Web. A little competition from Google will keep the next generation of cross-platform websites from all looking the same.Photo via Web Starter Kit Related Posts last_img read more

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Boonville police warn of phone scam

first_imgThe Boonville Police Department is warning residents about a phone scam going around.Officers said the caller claims that your social security number has been used, and that a warrant has been issued for your arrest.The caller will then request that you push “1” for more information.“They are trying to gather your personal information to use,” the department wrote in a press release. “Social Security has no authority to issue warrants.”If you get a call like this, hang up immediately.last_img

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How the sandfish lizard stays sand-free

first_imgThe sandfish lizard spends most of its life buried in the sand—emerging only to eat, poop, and make love. This lifestyle helps the lizard evade the sweltering desert heat in the Middle East and North Africa, but it causes another problem: inhaling sand particles. Yet when scientists looked into the respiratory tract and lungs of five dead lizards, they couldn’t find a single grain of sand. They couldn’t find an obvious filter in the lizard’s respiratory system, either. Puzzled, the scientists attached sensors to the chests of living lizards and studied their breathing patterns. They found the lizards breathe out with about 60% more intensity inside their sandy burrows than when they are aboveground, which might allow them to expel sand particles from their nostrils. The scientists also estimated a 70% drop in the speed of inhaled air when it hits the widest section of the lizard’s respiratory tract. This likely means that as the air slows down, sand particles fall and get trapped in mucus and cilia that line the section, the scientists report today in the Journal of Experimental Biology. From there, some particles are blown out during exhalation and others are swallowed, after which they pass through the digestive tract and out of the body. At least, that’s the latest theory, supported by the fact that the lizards’ guts were full of sand.last_img read more

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