Leading journalist claims Zaha won’t join Everton this summer – despite £55m bid

first_img Wilfried Zaha may well be staying at Crystal Palace this season Getty Images ‘I’ll get him’ – Robertson further endears himself to fans with revenge vow to Mane latest However, no bids were received from clubs in Europe’s elite competition, with Arsenal the only side to show a serious interest at first.After Unai Emery saw a £40million offer for the Ivory Coast international rebuffed, Sky Sports News claimed on Sunday morning Everton made a bid of £55million for the winger.But King revealed on the Weekend Sports Breakfast just how far the deal is from being completed.“With Zaha, I’ve got to be truthful and tell you what I’ve heard,” he said. “I’ve heard that it’s not a deal that is going to happen. getty images gameday cracker Wilfried Zaha scored against Arsenal in a 3-2 win late last season “I think Zaha would be a huge outlay for Everton, never mind the transfer fee, the wages and agent fees and whatever.“I think that would take it close to £100m, it just isn’t the transfer fee you know.“And I’m not sure, if they need five players, they’re not going to use all of it on one.”Zaha’s move to the Gunners also seems unlikely given how quickly a deal for Nicolas Pepe has progressed. revealed scrap Sky Sports presenter apologises for remarks made during Neville’s racism discussion MOST READ IN FOOTBALL SORRY The average first-team salaries at every Premier League club in 2019 PAYBACK LATEST Gerrard launches furious touchline outburst as horror tackle on Barisic sparks chaos deals Boxing Day fixtures: All nine Premier League games live on talkSPORT Wilfried Zaha is NOT going to move to Everton in the summer transfer window despite reports of a £55million bid from the Toffees.That’s according to Dominic King, the North-West correspondent for the Daily Mail, who told talkSPORT ‘a deal is not going to happen’.The Crystal Palace winger stunned Eagles supporters at the end of last season by revealing his desire to leave Selhurst Park and ply his trade for a Champions League side. Liverpool news live: Klopp reveals when Minamino will play and issues injury update Arsenal transfer news LIVE: Ndidi bid, targets named, Ozil is ‘skiving little git’ 2 Man United transfer news live: Haaland ‘wants a change’, two players off in January 2 According to reports, the Lille winger is preparing to undergo a medical ahead of a £72m move to the Emirates.Napoli had agreed a deal with Lille in order to bring the Ivory Coast international to Serie A, but Arsenal hijacked the deal on Saturday morning.Reports suggest the 23-year-old will pocket £105,000-a-week in north London, joining Gabriel Martinelli, Dani Ceballos and William Saliba in putting pen to paper at the Emirates this summer.last_img read more

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But, What Happens When You Assume?

first_imgOriginally posted on The Employee Handbook blog. Imagine that you operate a valet parking service at a large hotel and you’re looking to hire a parking attendant. Your 10 am interview arrives. You say, “good morning.” He responds in sign language.He’s deaf.A deaf parking attendant?!?What do you do? What if he wants an accommodation to complete the job interview? Is there any reason to go forward at all?Yes, I can think of 150,000 reasons to take this applicant seriously.So, can the EEOC, which sued a valet parking service last year because the company allegedly failed to hire a qualified deaf applicant, because of his disability.Yesterday, the EEOC announced that it had settled the lawsuit for $150,000. Here’s more from the EEOC press release:According to the EEOC’s lawsuit, [the company] violated the law by refusing to hire a deaf applicant for a valet attendant position based on the assumption that a deaf person could not perform the essential functions of the job rather than conduct an individualized assessment of his abilities.…Failure to hire on the basis of stereotypes and assumptions about a disability and the failure to conduct an individualized assessment as to whether a particular disabled applicant can perform the job violates the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), as amended.Not only will the company have to pay $150,000 to settle the claim, but also it must “affirmatively recruit applicants who are deaf and hearing-impaired and to add TTY capability to its discrimination hotline for the use of deaf and hearing-impaired applicants and employees.”That, and a lot of EEOC-mandated training.FYI – I am an EEOC-approved trainer, who has trained employers as required under consent decrees. Although, I assume that the folks, like this employer, that could benefit from an EEOC-approved trainer like me don’t read this blog.What should your business do differently?For those of you who are reading this blog, I offer this tip, courtesy of the EEOC: “Disabled individuals are entitled to a fair opportunity to work under the ADA, and that includes a fair hiring process. Individuals with disabilities must be evaluated on whether they can perform the essential functions of the job, not on stereotypes or assumptions.”Other tips:If a deaf applicant needs an interpreter, find one.Then, consider whether the deaf applicant can perform the essential functions of the job with or without accommodation. If you’re unsure, produce a job description and ask the applicant, “How will you do the job?”If you’re still not sure whether a deaf individual can safely perform the essential functions of the job, consult a resource like the Job Accommodation Network, which has an entire section on accommodating deaf employees.last_img read more

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What is The Future of Human Powered Search?

first_imgRelated Posts Mahalo popularized the term “human powered search” when they launched just over a year ago. Many of the pitches we get still use that term as part of their positioning. Many of them are bootstrapped, so the price of entry is clearly low. But the upside has not yet been established. In this post we look at the pros and cons of human powered search engines in general, look at some differentiating strategies and ask “what is the future for Human Powered Search?”Old Wine In New Bottles?When Mahalo first launched, my instinctive reaction (which I recorded on my personal Blog) was that this was “old wine in new bottles”. Traditional publishers have been doing “human powered search” even BI (Before Internet) but these went by boring names like Directory. Human editors work great in well defined niches, always have done and always will. Human editors produce the expert content that Google finds for you. This is long tail publishing. This is Business Media and Enthusiast Media, large but slow growth traditional publishing segments of the media industry.But an Internet scale venture powered by humans rather than software? We look at three reasons why this might work and two reasons why it won’t work.Three Pros And Two ConsMost ventures in this space highlight three things that a human editor can always do better than a software program. These are the three Pros:1. Spam control. Humans can easily spot even the most ingenious spam .2. Duplicate control. 10 articles that all say virtually the same thing are just a waste of time.3. Disambiguation. Computers need an awful lot of expensive programming to always spot the difference between “apple” as a fruit, a consumer electronics company or a record label. Humans can do it in a flash.The two Cons:1. You cannot persuade people to break their Google habit until your searches are better than Google for most cases (not just the few cases where you specialize). This massive hurdle is true for all search engines.2. You cannot win as a destination site if you are general purpose. You go to the sites that specialize in the areas that interest you. If you don’t know what sites to go to, Google will find those sites for you.So, do three Pros beat two Cons? Not in this case. The Pros are three relatively minor irritants that human powered search fixes. The Cons are total showstoppers.Pay People To Write Content?Mahalo pays people to create content. That means they can predict the quality of the results. Paying people requires lots of funding. Mahalo has plenty of funding and it is unlikely anybody else will get funded with the same model. So Mahalo has a fairly long and clear runway before take-off. Mahalo is private company so we don’t know how long it will take them to get to profitability or even if the basic economics make profitability feasible at all. In today’s climate, nobody will buy Mahalo without a clear path to profitability.Are you Bullish or Bearish on Mahalo? Cast your vote in our Company Index (powered by TradeVibes). My vote was Bearish and I was in the majority at the time I cast my vote (80% Bullish vs 20% Bearish). The sample size on that vote was too low to be meaningful (40), so the more votes the better.The Elephant In The Community Generated Content RoomMost other ventures get “the community” to create the content. The elephant in this room is of course Wikipedia. How on earth do you get general knowledge content that is better at scale than Wikipedia? How do you motivate people to create content if, unlike Mahalo, you are not paying their salaries? Google’s answer with Knol was to pay them indirectly via Adsense revenue. The market jury on Knol is still out. If Google cannot win, how can any other start-up without their brand power? If the Knol competitor also monetizes through Adsense, their margin is even less.About The PlayersThe other well funded venture that wears the human powered search label is Wikia. Founded by Jimmy Wales of Wikipedia fame, this looks like the largest pure Wiki style venture. Content is community generated, but it appears that they have editors/moderators/curators on payroll.Squidoo looks like a bootstrapped venture. It is hard to tell if it has traction. Looking at Squidoo’s page on TradeVibes will point to many other inexpensive Wiki style ventures. The basic technology of Wikis is now a total commodity.One of the earliest ventures, About.com, is now owned by the New York Times. On my survey of one, About is the one site other than Wikipedia that surfaces a lot in general knowledge type searches. At the scale they operate, it may well be profitable. So Mahalo, Wiki and other human powered search engines may have a bright future.What do you think? Can general purpose human powered search engines scale and make money? Or will they either fail or move into small niches? What new ventures have a fundamentally differentiated approach to this market? bernard lunn Tags:#NYT#Trends#web A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai…center_img 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic…last_img read more

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Data Center Power Management for 2012

first_imgTo put these capabilities in practice in your data center environment, you can adopt one of the solutions described under Policy-Based Power Management in the Intel® Cloud Builder library.I would love to hear from you if you have a specific usage case that is not covered.Best Regards! Although energy costs are the fastest-rising cost element in the data center, the power battle hasn’t been lost. There are still many opportunities to improve efficiency. These include cooling optimization using hot and cold aisles, increasing rack density, turning on/off machines on demand, and balancing load in the data center to optimize cooling and reduce power consumption.All these opportunities can potentially be achieved with Intel® Intelligent Power Node Manager, a technology embedded into Intel chips in a select group of servers. Some of most common scenarios where Intel Intelligent Power Node Manager can be applied beyond monitoring include: The Static Power Capping usage model employs more aggressive capping.  There will be some performance impact during peak, but this should be OK as long as the service level agreement (SLA) is met.  The effect is to increase infrastructure utilization.Usage model No. 4 (Dynamic Power Capping) implements continuous capping for additional power savings.  The capping level is determined by the application performance monitor driving a power management policy.  This scheme may not be practical if the performance monitoring facility is not available.For instance, in virtualized environments, where hosts run a variety of applications, it is difficult to isolate a meaningful indicator representing the application mix. For want of a better indicator, monitoring CPU utilization has been surprisingly useful in some settings. The idea is to impose a cap on a server based on the current CPU utilization in that server. The actual capping level, in watts, is derived heuristically from offline experiments with representative workload mixes, yielding energy savings of 10 to 15 percent over a daily workload cycle.In usage model No. 5 (Hybrid Usages), the practical capping range is limited to about 30 percent of peak power in light configurations. If the goal is energy saving, non-operating states, such as hibernation, must be added to Intel Intelligent Power Node Manager policies.  This is possible in virtualized cloud environments that allow dynamic consolidation of workloads into a pool of active machines and the shutting down of unused machines.What’s new with Intel Intelligent Power Node Manager 2.0The following table compares the features in each version of Intel Intelligent Power Node Manager.center_img Increasing compute density—enforcing power limits based on power reported and populating racks with more servers using the previously stranded power capacity in the rackLinking cooling to actual demand—coordinating Intel Intelligent Power Node Manager power and thermal data with data center cooling controls to help ensure that adequate, but not excessive, cooling is provided, minimizing cooling costsDynamically balancing resources—using migrations tools to move workloads to racks with available power headroom, and using Intel Intelligent Power Node Manager’s power capping to help ensure the rack budget is not exceededIn addition to these optimization scenarios, Intel Intelligent Power Node Manager can be applied to increase availability, applying power capping in case of power outage and reducing the overall consumption with some performance penalty.With the launch of the Intel® Xeon® E5 processor, the second generation of Intel Intelligent Power Node Manager (aka. 2.0) has been released. It is designed to improve monitoring and control granularity and to allow implementation of a range of usage models, as depicted here:These scenarios go from simple real-time power monitoring to integrated data center power management practices. Expected higher payoffs for power management require higher investment and process maturity to deploy.You don’t necessarily have to step up to the top, or even one of the more advanced usage models. Some situations could be enough for usage model No. 1, Real Time Server Power Monitoring. There may be no reason to invest beyond this point.In usage model No. 2 (Power Guard Rail) and No. 3 (Static Power Capping), Intel Intelligent Power Node Manager allows you to pack servers more densely in a rack by imposing a guaranteed power limit.Consider this scenario: In a traditional method, we usually take the specification of the power supply rating from the server manufacture, e.g. 650W, and test in a lab the real power consumption using a power meter. We then discover that 400W is reasonable to be used. In a typical 4KW power envelope, we usually populate the rack with 10 servers (i.e. 4.000W/400W = 10). Using Intel Intelligent Power Node Manager in the same server, measurements indicate that for a defined workload, the power consumption rarely exceeds 250W. Using that as an aggressive power/server budget, and enforcing 4KW for a global cap, i.e. the entire rack, only on rare situations could the consumption exceed the 4KW envelope, and will not exceed that amount due to Intel Intelligent Power Node Manager policy. In this scenario, we can then populate a rack with 16 servers instead of 10 (i.e. 4.000W/250W = 16), for an increase of 60 percent in rack density.last_img read more

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Second injury blow for Pakistan, Mohammad Hafeez out of World Cup

first_imgPakistan received yet another injury blow on Sunday when their top-order batsman Mohammad Hafeez was ruled out of World Cup due to an ankle injury. Hafeez is the second player to be ruled out after Junaid Khan failing to recover from a thigh injury had to be replaced by Rahat Ali.Hafeez was recently banned by the ICC from bowling due to suspect bowling action. But he has been able to hold on to his place in the Pakistan line-up as an opener. Hafeez in ODIs has scored 4542 runs at an average of 31.10, which includes nine hundreds and 23 half-centuries.It is learnt that the Pakistan Cricket Board has sent the name of left-handed batsman Nasir Jamshed to the ICC technical committee for inclusion in the World Cup squad as a replacement, as reported by dawn.com on Sunday.On Saturday, ICC cleared offspinner Saeed Ajmal’s bowling action, allowing him to resume bowling in international cricket.last_img read more

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World Cup: Sourav Ganguly picks his top four teams in tournament

first_imgNobody can argue about him being India’s most successful Test captain and one of the greatest one-day batsmen of all time. Sourav Ganguly shared his tips & tricks with Vikrant Gupta in an exclusive interview, talking about his experience in past World Cups and how he evaluates 2015 World Cup.Watch Video On India’s World Cup title defence:Though it’s still too early to predict the winner, India boast the team that is capable of retaining the World Cup. Their transformation in the tournament has been amazing. The knockout stage will be crucial and only the best teams will survive. India must focus on one game at a time to build on their campaign. South Africa, even if they lost their last game against Pakistan, are still strong contenders at the World Cup.On India’s hiccups during West Indies game:Indian batting has been the strength and the team has always won after scoring big runs in the past. Their game against Windies was really important. India had earlier pressurized the opposition with big scores on board after batting first. But against Windies, they were asked to bowl and the pressure was on India to perform better. And that’s what they did. They reduced the Windies to 185 and then chased the total despite a few hiccups. It will be a learning experience for India having chased under pressure. On MS Dhoni’s knock against West Indies:It was also a crucial game for MS Dhoni who has been missing in action for the Indian team. It allowed him to get his confidence back while he played a responsible innings for his team. He avoided risky shots and build his innings on singles to get India home.On India’s performance in the bowling department:advertisementThe Indian bowlers are complementing the batsmen in the best possible manner. The bowlers have actually made life easier for the batsmen. They’ve bowled out the opposition in crucial games including South Africa and West Indies. Pakistan was the only team that managed to score over 200 runs against India in the tournament. The bowlers have actually taken the centre stage this time around. The history has showed that the batsmen have dominated when India has played well. In the early phase of the World Cup, it’s actually the bowlers who have set the game for the team.The defining moment in the World Cup so far:Shikhar Dhawan’s runs at the top against Pakistan and South Africa have been crucial for India’s campaign in the World Cup. A good opening stand is always crucial for a team. South Africa’s struggle has been majorly affected by the same reason. Quinton de Kock and Hashim Amla have struggled to score runs at the top order. Opening is a very important aspect in these conditions. Dhawan has been the real game changer for India so far. Though the Indian fast bowlers have also been crucial, but runs at the top are very important.On World Cup title contenders:India, Australia, South Africa and New Zealand are my top four favourites to clinch the World title. Anybody’s capable of beating anyone on the all-important day. But, India and New Zealand have been most consistent in the tournament so far. But as I said, anyone is capable of springing a surprise in the knockout stage.On India’s opponent in the quarterfinals:It depends on the England-Bangladesh game. I believe England will sail through and they can make the competition a bit tougher for India. They have beaten India in the past and are more than capable of getting the better of MS Dhoni’s men in the quarters. But if Bangladesh managed to knock England out, then life will obviously be easier for the Indian team. Bangladesh, despite producing big upsets in the past, doesn’t have the art of beating big teams consistently. As an Indian, I would actually prefer Bangladesh over England to play against India in the quarterfinals.Weaker links in Indian team:The Indian team has been superb and I don’t think there are any weak links. I’ve said before, you don’t fix anything if it’s not broken. And nothing looks broken at the moment for India and they’ve been in top form.On World Cup triumph in 1983:I remember that night, it was raining in Kolkata. I was 10 years old and there was no cable television at our disposal. We were watching the final on Doordarshan and I remember the last wicket of Mohinder Amarnath when Michael Holding went for the pull and got out lbw. The players running from the ground to the Lord’s balcony was just unbelievable. It actually triggered Indian cricket forward. It was my first and foremost experience of the World Cup. In 1992, I was part of the Test team and played the Tri-series too. But, I missed the World Cup after being left out of the squad since I was fairly young. I watched that World Cup from home. I also remember the semifinals in the 1996 World Cup when Sri Lanka went past India. I was in the stands watching that game. There were flames all over the ground and the crowd was unhappy. The Indian players were being criticized and I believe they misread the pitch – bowled on a track where they should have batted first. On playing his first-ever World Cup in 1999:advertisementThe 1999 World Cup was my first time on the big stage. I played my first World Cup game against South Africa where I scored 97 runs before being run-out by Jonty Rhodes. It was special playing in England because I also played my first Test match there in 1996. I wasn’t scoring runs in the warm-up games ahead of the World Cup. So I really had to work hard before the first game against South Africa. They had superb attack in Pollock, Donald, Klusener and Kallis. I was happy to get runs and that’s how my World Cup started. I also went on register my big hundred against Sri Lanka where I scored 183 runs. In the crucial game against England, I also managed to get runs and wickets for the team. I managed to claim two or three Man of the Match awards in the 1999 World Cup. I really liked the format of the 1999 World Cup. You had to play the big teams in the group stage and then you go onto play the bigger and better teams in the Super Six stage. So by the end of it, you were really the World Champions that Australia became after beating Pakistan.On losing the 2003 World Cup final:We had a fantastic team in the 2003 World Cup. But, Australia was undoubtedly a cut above the rest. We played 11 games in the tournament and lost only two games – both against Australia. We defeated every opponent including New Zealand, Pakistan, England and Sri Lanka. But Australia defeated us, first at the start of the tournament and then in the all-important final at the end. I was comfortable in opening role but Sachin Tendulkar was batting at number four slot. And just before the World Cup we thought that if India wants to play well, then Sachin has to play well. And Sachin wanted to bat at the top, so I stepped down to number three and he joined Virender Sehwag as the opener. I don’t think there’s much of a difference in the top three batting positions. They are all crucial positions and add equally to the team’s success. Rahul Dravid also did a commendable job at number five position to anchor the innings till the end.On his last World Cup in 2007:advertisementIt was disappointing and it was the end of the World Cup career for a lot of us including Anil Kumble and Rahul Dravid. When I look back at our team under Dravid’s captaincy, I think we had the team and the players which could actually win games for you. But, we didn’t play well and the poor start to the tournament worked against us. Our loss against Bangladesh exerted a lot of pressure on us.On World Cup triumph in 2011:I was there as a commentator but I actually came down to witness the prize distribution ceremony. The 2003 loss in the World Cup final against Australia was still in my mind and I wanted to live the winning moment. I stood right next to the podium and the players during the ceremony. I wanted to enjoy the moment and see what it felt like to be the World champions.last_img read more

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