Is there cause to worry?

first_imgDear Editor,Editor, in an earlier letter I have addressed the curious timing of comments made by the CCJ President, Sir Dennis Byron, about the need for substantive appointments of a Chancellor and Chief Justice in Guyana, when he was silent about the same state of affairs prior to 2015. I have also written about his frequent visits to Guyana and comments by the Attorney General, Basil Williams, made about ‘close’ relations between Sir Byron and the Coalition Government – comments that were made by Williams on the corridors of the High Court.I feel it necessary to question linkages between Sir Byron and the Coalition Government, since I have received some feedback after my first letter on this issue and was told that there is no clear linkage between the CCJ President and the Coalition Government other that comments from the Attorney General.Editor, aside from the Attorney General, personalities close to the Coalition Government also have close links to the CCJ President. In 2012, according to a Stabroek News article, dated October 13, 2012, it was Senior Counsel Donald Trotman (Minister Raphael Trotman’s father) and retired Judge James Patterson – current Chairman of the Guyana Elections Commission – who presented the petition for Patterson’s grandson, Richard Layne, to be admitted to the local Bar.Richard Layne – whose grandfather’s appointment is currently challenged in Guyana’s courts and could very well end up at the CCJ – is currently the Judicial Assistant attached to Sir Byron, according to his LinkedIn profile. Layne, among other things, prepares legal opinions and advice to the President on matters brought to the attention of the Court.Also, Editor, Mr Layne’s matriculation is another curious matter, given that after his matriculation he served at the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and moved swiftly without any experience to his current position. Someone should question how this happened.Editor, it was none other than Sir Byron who talked about an independent and impartial judiciary when he spoke at the Guyana Bar Association last August. But in light of worrisome linkages in Guyana, the question now is – Is there cause to worry? Like I said in my last letter, Sir Byron has not clarified his involvement in local happenings.Regards,Todd A Morganlast_img read more

Continue reading

Essequibo trio nabbed after alleged break and enter at Henrietta

first_imgPolice in G Division (Essequibo Coast/Essequibo Islands) acting promptly on information about a break and enter at a Henrietta residence, apprehended three men who were allegedly involved in the act.The trio: Akim Spellen, 21, Deon Dwarka, 23, and Mark McKenzie, 33, aka Bora, all of Henrietta Housing Scheme are in Police custody.The Police nabbed the suspects and recovered the stolen items when the men admitted to committing the act.The men allegedly broke into the home of Norma Hercules between November 9 and 10 at around 06:00h. One flat-screen television valued 0,000 and one camera monitor valued ,000 were stolen.According to information, on November 10, pensioner Ivy John, 69, who usually takes care of the house and who would visit regularly to clean, discovered the house was broken and the items missing.The Police were summoned and the suspects later apprehended. Investigations are ongoing.last_img read more

Continue reading

Rotary Clubs raising money to help eliminate polio this weekend

first_imgFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. — Both Rotary Clubs in Fort St. John are going to be teaming up to help raise money in the fight towards eradicating a disease that is often assumed to no longer be a problem.Rotary Club of Fort St. John President-elect Raven Pruden said that this Satruday, both his Club and the Sunrise Rotary Club will be bringing world-renown polio survivor Ramesh Ferris to speak at the Lido Theatre about his experiences contracting the disease. Poliomyelitis is an infectious disease caused by the polio virus that causes permanent paralysis in 1 out of 200 cases.Though the first vaccine against the virus was developed in the 1950’s, and Canada last recorded a case of polio in 1978, there were 42 cases of polio recorded in 2016 in Afghanistan, Pakistan, and Nigeria. The World Health Organization has set a goal of completely eradicating cases of polio infection by 2018.- Advertisement -Pruden said that this weekend’s event will feature Ferris speaking about his experiences, and helping to bring awareness to the fact that the disease has not been completely eradicated the way other deadly diseases such as smallpox have been. The event is by donation, with 100 percent of the proceeds going to the End Polio Now campaign. Pruden said that those funds raised will be matched by the federal government and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.The Fort St. John Interact Club is also going to be helping raise money for the End Polio Now campaign on Sunday with a hot drink sale at Save on Foods. The fundraiser is taking place from 1:00 to 5:00 p.m. on Sunday, with each drink set to cost one dollar or by donation.End Polio Now is taking place on Saturday at the Lido Theatre. Doors open at 6:30 p.m., with the presentation beginning at 7:30. Admission is by donation.Advertisementlast_img read more

Continue reading

Cell-phone law confusion leads to hands-free frenzy

first_img 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! Convinced that gripping a cell phone while driving would become illegal Sunday, a customer walked into Jacob Peykar’s wireless store to beat the deadline. Peykar said Thursday that he tried to tell his persistent customer that the hands-free law was still a year away, but to no avail. The man spent $300 at the Woodland Hills shop to deck out his wife, kids and mother with blinking blue earpieces. “He was so convinced, I almost believed him, too,” Peykar said. But Peykar’s customer and lots of other Californians are wrong. The law will take effect July 1 — of 2008. That hasn’t stopped law-fearing but confused citizens from rushing to cell-phone shops, calling police and even the law’s author to make sure they’re legal to chat on the roads. Officials have blamed an e-mail hoax for helping to spread the panic that just days remain before drivers could be hit with fines. Peykar and other cell-phone retailers said they saw spikes in the sale of hands-free devices at the beginning of the year, too, as customers thought the law began Jan. 1. Under the state law, drivers will be prohibited from using handheld cell phones. First-time offenders can be slapped with a $20 fine; repeat offenders, $50. Commercial truck drivers and 911-dialers are among those exempt. The California Highway Patrol said it also has received calls from worried motorists and will launch an educational campaign to warn drivers before July 1, 2008, when the law really takes effect. That day, officers will start pulling over and citing cell-wielding drivers, Officer John Lutz said. But Sunday, no traffic laws or fines that affect the general public will change. At least 15 to 20 people have called the author of the hands-free bill, Sen. Joe Simitian, D-Palo Alto. The bill was signed into law in September. Normally, bills become law on the first Jan. 1 after they are signed, or sometimes on July 1. Simitian said he designated an extra 18 months to give state officials more time to incorporate the new rules into driver’s handbooks and inform the public — and give owners of mobile phones more time to adapt their technology. Simitian has also authored legislation to prohibit minors from using cell phones — even with hands-free devices — while driving. That bill, which has passed the Senate and is now pending in the Assembly, also would also take effect July 1, 2008. “I suppose there are worse things than people taking a little extra care and caution a year ahead of time,” Simitian said. “I suspect it is spawned largely by the misinformation on the Internet. … Thus far it hasn’t been terribly widespread.” The fact that the Internet fueled the rumor came as no surprise to Jeffrey Cole, director of the Center for the Digital Future at the University of Southern California. The Web has long been used to scare people about “new” laws, Cole said. He recalled a message he received a few years ago voicing outrage that Congress was going to start taxing e-mails. “The Internet has really become the office water cooler for the world,” he said. Lauren Sarafan didn’t learn she had fallen victim to the rumor mill until after she had forwarded the message to dozens of friends and family members. “This is probably the first hoax I really fell for, and I feel really stupid,” the 40-year-old Studio City resident said. “It felt right.” So far, Peykar has received the hoax e-mail twice from friends and relatives. But the prank hasn’t upset the owner of Virtual Wireless too much — what’s the worst that could happen? More people driving with hands-free headsets? “It doesn’t hurt,” he said. “It’s a safe thing, anyway.”— Staff Writer Harrison Sheppard contributed to this report.last_img read more

Continue reading

Why Katrina and New Orleans still matter

first_imgInadequate health care. A housing crisis. Crumbling infrastructure. Racial division. Poor schools. Rising crime. And at the core of these and other problems threatening our way of life: a pernicious failure of leadership. Katrina did more than claim lives and property. It ripped away the glitzy veneer that made New Orleans’ reputation and exposed a festering brew of problems lingering beneath – problems endemic to the rest of the nation, begging for attention, if we only had the guts to look. If this country can’t help New Orleans rebound – if we and our leaders break the promises made to its citizens – what are the odds your health care will ever get cheaper? Your bridges safer? Your schools better? “New Orleans is an incubator for all our nation’s ills,” said historian Douglas Brinkley, author of “The Great Deluge,” a book about Katrina. “If you study what’s going on in New Orleans, it’s just an exaggerated version of what’s hitting us in many areas of the country,” he said. “Just pick your topic.” OK, let’s start from the top. FOR YOUR HEALTH Katrina made a bleak health-care system worse in New Orleans. The death rate jumped 47 percent after Katrina as a city of 270,000 mostly poor and middle-class people lost seven of 22 hospitals and more than half of its hospital beds. Nearly 4,500 doctors were displaced from three New Orleans parishes. The lack of space for mental patients has caused problems for police departments, who have complained of having to use officers’ time to drive from hospital to hospital looking for vacant beds. Dr. Atul Gawande, a local surgeon and author, said the city’s medical system is in a “death spiral” that is more rapid – but no less certain – than the crash course the rest of the nation is on. It goes like this: People rely on employers for health insurance. They lose their jobs. They lose their insurance. They can’t afford their pills. They put off doctors’ visits. Minor illnesses become major. They go to the emergency room. The emergency overflows with uninsured patients. The hospital loses money. Insurance rates skyrocket. The hospital shuts its emergency room. Uninsured patients crowd other ERs. Doctors leave town. Businesses leave town. Jobs are lost. Repeat. New Orleans is just one city in a country with more than 43 million uninsured, a figure that increased 2 million from 2005 to 2006, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Nearly 20 percent of working-age Americans did not have health insurance in 2006. The percentage of uninsured among the 20 largest states ranged from 7.7 percent in Michigan to 23.8 percent in Texas. “What you see in New Orleans is the extreme of what happens when you live in a flawed health care system. And all of us do,” said Gawande, author of “Better,” a book about the system’s failures. “It’s a slow-motion train wreck.” NO ROADS HOME The homeless population of New Orleans has nearly doubled since before Hurricane Katrina. Many of the poor, mentally ill and drug-addicted are squatting in the city’s estimated 80,000 vacant dwellings. Tens of thousands of other people are a bit luckier, living in badly damaged homes, government trailers and out-of-state apartments. The state and federal governments are in a petty fight over how to fund the Road Home program, which is supposed to help people repair and rebuild houses. With 183,000 people applying for the aid, the Road Home program’s needs exceed its budget by about $5 billion. Nationally, ill winds are stirring up a crisis that sharp eyes saw coming. The combination of higher interest rates and weaker home values has clobbered homeowners, especially those with higher-risk subprime mortgages. Hundreds of thousands, maybe millions of borrowers, stand to lose their homes while Washington and the media obsess over the impact on Wall Street. BRIDGES FALLING DOWN The New Orleans levees were not built to withstand a sizable hurricane, a historic lapse of judgment and competence topped only by this: The levees are still not ready for the next serious storm. The city’s 3,200-mile system of water and sewer lines were old, leaky and in need of repair long before the hurricane. The crush of pipe-corroding salt water made things worse. Miles of New Orleans streets were destroyed or damaged by the storm, and remain in disrepair because the city failed to give the federal government a to-do list. This can’t be much comfort to the people of Minnesota, where the collapse of an Interstate 35W bridge killed at least 13. President Bush toured the site, promising to cut red tape and rebuild. Just as he toured New Orleans, making promises to be broken. From New York to California, cities are raising utility rates and issuing bonds in hopes of modernizing public works systems straining under increasing populations. The American Society of Civil Engineers estimates that $1.6 trillion is needed over a five-year period to bring the nation’s water systems, runways, dams and roads and bridges to a good condition. Government agencies have set aside just $1 trillion for infrustracture improvements in the next five years, and those budgets are historically raided for other purposes. BLACK & WHITE For many blacks, Katrina is their generation’s epic reminder of how far the nation is from true racial equality. The hurricane had a predominantly black toll, and many blacks felt the fatally inept response was tinged by racism. Whites were less likely to think so. “You have to go back to slavery, or the burning of black towns, to find a comparable event that has affected black people this way,” Darnell M. Hunt, a sociologist and head of the African American studies department at UCLA, said days after the storm. ABCs Of the students in New Orleans high schools taken over by the state after Katrina, two-thirds flunked the state graduation exam. At least 40 percent of the city’s fourth-graders and one-third of the eighth-graders in those schools failed promotion exams. Many flood-ravaged schools remain closed. Most New Orleans schools performed poorly long before Katrina and the school system was riddled with corruption, mismanagement and poor bookkeeping. Sound familiar? Nationally, nearly 40 percent of high school seniors score below the basic level on national math tests. More than a quarter of seniors fail to reach the basic level on the reading test. Three decades ago, the U.S. had 30 percent of the world’s population of college students. That has fallen to 14 percent. “A strong school system is providing a variety of community functions that are primarily unseen,” said Phil Schlechty, a leading advocate of school reform. “In New Orleans, where the schools are not a part of the community, they couldn’t even get the buses out of the parking lots.” IT’S A CRIME Military police in their Humvees still patrol New Orleans streets, where the murder rate has doubled, the number of police has declined and crime suspects walk free because of legal system that was at the brink of collapse before Katrina. Nationally, a lull in violent crime has come to an abrupt halt. The murder rate jumped by more than 10 percent in large cities since 2004. Robberies also spiked, as did felony assaults and attacks with guns. WHO’S IN CHARGE? Nobody. At least that’s the prevailing view of most Americans. Katrina showed governments failing to prevent a crises, moving sluggishly to respond to it and refusing to be accountable. Charities, churches and other institutions couldn’t fill the vacuum. We live in an era of failed leadership. Corrupt and incompetent politicians. Thieving CEOs. Priests as pedophiles. Media monopolies. A president’s unpopular, intractable war. Steroid-enhanced sluggers. Where have you gone, Joe DiMaggio? Or Harry Truman? A recent Gallup Poll shows that the public is losing confidence with the institutions that make up the fragile fabric of society. The military, police, churches, banks, the U.S. Supreme Court, public schools, the medical system, the presidency, TV news, newspapers, the criminal justice system, organized labor and Congress – all lost ground from 2006 to 2007 in terms of the public’s confidence. More than 7 of 10 Americans think their country is headed in the wrong direction. Katrina is old news, right? New Orleans – who cares? You should.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! NEW ORLEANS – Katrina is old news, right? New Orleans – who cares? It’s just another big city with big problems, bad luck and bad weather. Get over it. Actually, please don’t. Don’t ever get over the tragedy of New Orleans. It’s your tragedy, too. What happened to this historic city two years ago is more than the obvious cautionary tale of what might befall your community after a natural disaster or a terrorist strike. It’s also a sad reflection of what’s happening now – today, in your hometown and across an anxious and ailing nation. last_img read more

Continue reading

HOUSING BOMBSHELL: DONEGAL ASKING PRICES HAVE DROPPED FURTHER 3% SINCE BEGINNING OF YEAR

first_imgTHE Donegal property market has been hit with another bombshell after the news that the average asking price for a house here has dropped a further 3% since the beginning of the year.The average price of a three bedroom house in Donegal now stands at €145,000 – one of the cheapest across the entire country.Other figures released by property website daft.ie show that a four bedroom house here now costs €195,000 and a larger five bedroom house stands at €266,000. During the height of the building boom larger five bedroom homes in Donegal were reaching and exceeding prices of €400,000 in many cases.Local estate agents are even casting doubts on those figures with many four bedroom homes on the market for less than €160,000.And the bad news according to economists with property website daft.ie is that house prices could continue to fall steeply in the coming months.With proposed interest rate increases and over-supply in the Donegal housing market, it now appears that those trying to sell houses have been caught in the perfect storm. Many builders are now offering turn-key packages for houses but they are still failing to attract much interest from nervous house-buyers.The latest news will do nothing to comfort dozens of local builders and contractors who were hoping for some good news from the new Government.Ronan Lyons, economist with Daft.ie said getting finance is the biggest obstacle for people trying to buy houses in Donegal and elsewhere. “An ongoing mismatch between supply and demand is pushing prices further down. Prospective buyers find it difficult to get the finance, while owner occupiers are often restricted by negative equity.“As a result, the market is moving very slowly. Of the 3,000 properties posted for sale fifteen months ago at the start of 2010, one in three is still for sale, although in Dublin the figure is closer to just one in six,” he said. EndsHOUSING BOMBSHELL: DONEGAL ASKING PRICES HAVE DROPPED FURTHER 3% SINCE BEGINNING OF YEAR was last modified: April 4th, 2011 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:daft.iedonegalhouse pricelast_img read more

Continue reading

Show brings out the hot in mother

first_imgIn a room full of knockout mothers adorned with showy jewelry, cowboy hats and outlandish boots, Erin Hamilton boasted the ultimate accessory: 5-week-old Dylan Joseph Hamilton West. The 38-year-old disco singer and teen counselor heard producers were on the hunt Sunday for the “Hottest Mom in America,” a reality program in development. She bundled her young son into his stroller, threw on a black dress – better for nursing – and headed to The El Rey Theatre on the Miracle Mile. A line of moms in high heels, tight jeans and low-cut tops snaked down Wilshire Boulevard. Inside, photographers’ strobes fired and mothers smiled and struck sexy poses. Hamilton, a Koreatown resident, rocked Dylan back and forth as she filled out her application. He was an attention magnet. “When you see a woman in her early 40s at the supermarket with a little kid and some super-low-rise jeans, she might be better looking than your 22-year-old girlfriend,” Greenfield said. “Your girlfriend looks good because she’s young. The 40-year-old looks good because she works at it. And that’s hot.” Oh, and work at it, they do. Blanca Arias, a 34-year-old kindergarten teacher from Pomona, came to try out at the insistence of her four children. Classy-looking in a red blouse, black shorts and black stilettos, her look belied her packed schedule. “I wake up at 4 a.m. and work out from 4:30 to 6:30,” she said. “Drop the kids off, work to 3:30 and pick ’em up. Soccer practice, baseball practice, theater, back-to-school night, make dinner, put them to bed and then do it all over again.” Some contestants got a little extra help, such as Olympia Schorr, a Palm Springs mom who enlisted the help of her husband, Kurt. While she tried out inside, he spoon fed their 14-month-old son, Oliver, a mango chicken pur e and watched over the stroller. “My wife gets a lot of compliments when she’s out. People don’t believe she’s really a mom,” Schorr said, scraping chicken chunks off the bottom of the bottle. “But she’s a great one. She’s really sacrificed a lot, so I wanted to support her out here today.” Three kids and a packed schedule couldn’t keep Rachelle Meyer, a 28-year-old Encino mom, stuck at home. In addition to trucking around her 5-,7-, and 8-year-old children, she works full time as an events planner and expects to look good in the process. With her long, slim legs tucked tightly into blue jeans and a red tank top that matched her high heels, Meyer looked like, well, a hot mom. As she waited for her turn before the camera, she twirled her brown hair around long, delicate fingers. “I think it’s important to take care of yourself and stay proactive – nails done, hair done, eyebrows done,” she said. “It’s important to feel good about yourself if you’re going to raise your kids. Plus, with three children, I’d better look good enough to keep my husband around.” brent.hopkins@dailynews.com (818) 713-3738160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORECalifornia’s bungled $1 billion accounting system “Aww, c’mon, Booger. Good baby,” she cooed at him. “You gotta have a sense of humor as a mom. Otherwise, all you care about is stinky diapers and smelly milk.” While other mothers showed off their still-taut bodies and wrinkle-free faces to compete for the attention of cameramen, Hamilton hoisted her baby to her shoulder and beamed. Many moms flaunted their bosom for the judges; she used hers to nurse. Producers have scoured Dallas, Miami, Chicago, Atlanta, New York and now Los Angeles for mothers with good looks and plenty of attitude. On Sunday, they expected 1,000 moms to make their way to the El Rey. There, they were evaluated by judges keen to see how their looks, charm, poise and grace held up against a relentless torrent of screaming kids, soccer practices and broken-down minivans. By midnight, they planned to whittle the field down to five. In coming months, those finalists will compete against other cities’ top moms and a nationwide field of Internet applicants. In spring, the show should take shape in seven to 13 episodes, which executive producer Jeff Greenfield hopes to shop to networks and develop for overseas production. As “The Graduate” did a generation ago, “Desperate Housewives” has made moms a hot commodity once again. last_img read more

Continue reading

St Mirren friendly cancelled as Bolton players strike

first_imgSt Mirren’s pre-season friendly against Bolton Wanderers has been cancelled at short notice after the English club’s players said that they were boycotting the game.The newly-promoted side were set to play against one of new manager Alan Stubbs’ former sides as they prepare for the season opener against Kilmarnock in the Betfred Cup. However, just one day before the game, Bolton’s players have announced that they will not play after wages to some players were not paid.A brief statement from Bolton confirmed the game would not go ahead and apologised for not fulfilling the fixture.“Bolton Wanderers Football Club can confirm that Saturday’s friendly game against St Mirren has been called off,” the club’s official account tweeted. “The football club would like to apologise for any inconvenience this will cause.”A St Mirren spokesperson said: “Tomorrow’s match against Bolton has been cancelled due to issues out with our control.We would like to apologise for the inconvenience this will cause.”The reasoning behind the Bolton players’ decision was given to the Bolton News. A statement read: “Due to circumstances beyond our control, we as a team have decided with deep regret we will not be playing tomorrow’s game against St Mirren.“We have been put in an impossible positon which has forced our decision, and we would like to explain our reasons why.“Over the past two seasons we as a club have experienced unprecedented success in first achieving promotion to the Championship, then staying in the league last season.“This was achieved despite extremely difficult circumstances. All players, current and past, who were contracted to the club have contributed to this success.“Over the course of the two years on numerous occasions contracted players have not been paid on time. This has culminated in certain players not receiving their June wage.“On each occasion this has happened we have received no notification or an explanation as to why. We feel this is totally unacceptable after a huge effort from everybody over the last two seasons.“Regrettably, as a group, this has led to the decision. We unreservedly apologise to any supporters that have made plans to come and watch the game.”last_img read more

Continue reading

Jackson County Inmate Roster – 9-27-18

first_imgBond:$2005 Charges:2 Transport Order-Adult Booking #:100022 Charges:35-48-4-11 Possession Marijuana/Hashish35-48-4-8.3 Possession of Paraphernalia Booking Date:09-26-2018 – 5:29 am Bond:No Bond Helt, Michele D Inmates released from the Jail within the last 24 hours. Charges:35-48-4-6.1 Poss of Meth9-24-19-2 DWS- Prior Unrelated Violation Booking Date:09-26-2018 – 4:22 pm Booking #:100020 Charges:34-47-2 Direct Contempt Booking Date:09-26-2018 – 10:40 am Bond:$4005 Booking Date:09-26-2018 – 6:45 pm Bond:No Bond View Profile >>> ross, Johnnie D Walker, Anthony Johnson, Mark A Booking #:100019 Bond:No Bond Charges:2 Transport Order-Adult Inmates booked into the Jail within the last 24 hours. View Profile >>> Booking #:100018 Mcqueen, Brandy N Booking Date:09-26-2018 – 11:25 am Release Date:09-26-2018 – 6:08 am View Profile >>> Booking #:100021 View Profile >>> View Profile >>>last_img read more

Continue reading

Jackson County Inmate Roster – 5-13-19

first_imgBond:No Bond Booking #:101283 Bond:No Bond Booking Date:05-12-2019 – 6:16 pm Bond:No Bond Charges:7.1-5-1-3 Public Intoxication35-45-1-3 Disorderly Conduct35-44.1-3-1(a) Resisting Law Enforcement Booking Date:05-12-2019 – 2:12 am Shearrow, Seth A Booking #:101287 View Profile >>> Charges:9-21-8-52 (A1) Reckless Driving-High Speed9-30-5-2 Operating Vehicle While Intox9-30-5-1(b) BAC .15% or greater Charges:9-24-18-1 Never Receiving Driver License Charges:9-30-5-2 Operating Vehicle While Intox9-30-5-1 BAC .08% to .14% Booking Date:05-12-2019 – 7:16 pm Booking #:101284 Release Date:05-12-2019 – 7:53 pm Bond:No Bond Charges:35-44-3-4 Obstructing Justice Inmates booked into the Jail within the last 24 hours. Brown, Ashley L Charges:34-47-2 Direct Contempt Treadway, Andrew K Baker, Alex S Baker, Kurtis A View Profile >>> View Profile >>> Booking #:101285 Murray, Thomas W Booking #:101286 View Profile >>> View Profile >>>center_img Inmates released from the Jail within the last 24 hours. Bond:$700 Charges:35-43-4-2(a)(1) Theft >$750 <$50000 or prior Booking #:101282 View Profile >>> Charges:35-43-4-2 A Theft35-43-5-4 Fraud Cash, Jerry W Booking #:101255 Bond:$705 Glasper, Antionette R Charges:7.1-5-1-3 Public Intoxication35-45-1-3 Disorderly Conduct35-44.1-3-1(a) Resisting Law Enforcement Booking Date:05-12-2019 – 7:43 pm Release Date:05-12-2019 – 7:08 pm Bond:$700 View Profile >>> Booking Date:05-08-2019 – 11:09 pm Booking Date:05-12-2019 – 11:13 pm Booking Date:05-12-2019 – 9:53 pm Booking #:101280 Booking Date:05-12-2019 – 3:44 am Bond:No Bond View Profile >>> Bond:No Bond Durham, Jeramy D Release Date:05-12-2019 – 7:08 pm Booking Date:05-12-2019 – 3:37 am Release Date:05-13-2019 – 2:38 am Booking #:101288 View Profile >>>last_img read more

Continue reading