Mistakes, big plays cost Keyport another title

first_img BY DOUG McKENZIE Staff Writer CHRIS KELLY staff Keyport senior J.J. Bedle hauls in a touchdown pass in the second quarter of Saturday’s CJ Group I final at Neptune’s Memorial Field. NEPTUNE — On paper, Florence looked like a team a year away from a state championship. With just four seniors and an underclassman-heavy roster, the Flashes entered Saturday’s Central Jersey Group I final against defending champion Keyport as the underdog, despite their flashy 11-0 mark. But by the end of the game, which was played at Neptune’s Memorial Field after a flurry of postponements, Florence proved itself a worthy champion against the mighty Red Raiders, a team riding a 22-game winning streak and featuring the state’s all-time rushing leader, Ken Cattouse. The Flashes scored a pair of second-half touchdowns, while shutting down what was one of the state’s most prolific offenses, en route to a 21-14 win, stunning the host Red Raiders. Ken Cattouse (l) hits the hole during the Red Raiders’ loss to Florence in the CJ Group I final on Saturday. Above, the Keyport defense tries to slow down Florence’s Abree Jones. Florence got on the board first, scoring on their third possession of the game following a trick play on a fourth down. Facing a fourth-and-four on the Keyport 33, Florence quarterback Ryan Shafer took a flea-flicker and found Shaquan Virgil for 24 yards, placing the ball at the Keyport seven-yard line. Two plays later, Shafer found the end zone from a yard out. It was the first trick play the Flashes used, but it would not be the last, nor would any of the plays come as a surprise to the Red Raiders. “We practiced against that stuff all week,” Keyport head coach Mike Ciccotelli said. “We knew what they were going to do; we just got out-played at times.” Keyport responded to the score the way they’ve responded all season long — with a steady dose of Cattouse. After the Red Raiders recovered the ensuing kickoff on their own 37, Cattouse broke free for a 27-yard gain. That play sparked a seven-play, 63-yard drive that was capped by Cattouse’s only touchdown of the day, from five yards out. The Keyport defense then stopped Florence, giving the offense the ball back at their own 47. Three plays later, sophomore quarterback Kevin Boyce hit another Red Raiders All-State player, senior J.J. Bedle, for a 53-yard scoring play, giving Keyport the 14-7 half-time lead, following Pete Czech’s PAT. “We had that momentum going into half-time, and I think we lost a little bit in there,” Ciccotelli said. In the second half, the Florence defense tightened, while the Flashes’ offense used some opportunistic plays to get back in the game. Florence tied the game after blocking a punt late in the third quarter, and starting at the Keyport 37-yard line. After an unsportsmanlike conduct penalty drove them back a bit, they advanced as far as the Keyport 35, where the drive appeared to be stalling with a third-and-21 play looming. The Flashes took a time-out, and then broke the huddle in a “muddle huddle” formation — a play usually reserved for PAT attempts — with six players lined up to the left of the center. Following the snap, one of those players, Dan Miller, broke downfield, where he got behind the Keyport defense and caught a 29-yard pass from Shafer, setting up a first-and-goal from the Keyport 5. It was the second trick play of the day that worked for Florence, and like the first, it changed the complexion of the game. Ciccotelli explained the play in simple terms. “Their kid just got behind our kid,” he said. Three plays later, Florence sophomore Abree Jones busted tackles on his way to the end zone for the game-tying score. After the Red Raiders were stopped on their ensuing possession, the Florence offense took over, looking to milk the clock. But the Keyport defense stood tall, forcing a punt deep in Florence territory. That, however, led to the game’s biggest play, when Bedle apparently touched the ball on a bounce before Florence players pounced on it at the Keyport 28-yard line. “I didn’t think he touched it, but I guess the official thought he did because he took off after it,” Ciccotelli said, after the game. “And he never drops anything.” The Flashes took advantage of the mistake, driving 25 yards in three plays before Jones found the end zone again from three yards out, giving them a 21-14 lead with 1:38 left on the clock. On the Red Raiders’ ensuing possession, they managed to get a first down before a mix-up in the backfield led to a Boyce fumble, which was recovered by Florence, effectively ending Keyport’s hopes for a repeat. Following the game, Ciccotelli was nothing but complimentary of the Flashes. “They played a great game, with a great defensive scheme,” he said. “Defensively we knew what they were going to do, and offensively we knew what they were going to do. We just got burned by mistakes.” But as much as Ciccotelli was impressed with the Flashes’ play, he was equally proud of his team’s effort. “They never quit. They’re comeback kids,” he said. “They came back against South River (in the semifinals), and they played hard all season. It’s a great bunch of guys. They showed up every game.” “They worked hard all year, and fought through a lot of adversity,” he added. “I feel bad for them that they have to go out like this.” With the loss, so ends the careers of two of the Shore Conference’s most electrifying athletes in Cattouse and Bedle. Cattouse, who ran for 143 yards on 21 carries on Saturday, finished with 2,166 yards on the season (his second consecutive 2,000-yard campaign), and 6,676 yards rushing for his illustrious career. He is currently being courted by numerous Division I-A programs, most notably Ohio State and Iowa. As for Bedle, he had another tremendous season for the Red Raiders, catching 49 passes for 995-receiving yards, and 11 touchdowns. But it was his ability to come up with the big play in the big spot that separated Bedle from the rest of the wide receivers in the Shore Conference, an ability that will lead to him continuing his career at Syracuse University next fall. “This is not the way I’d like to see him go out,” Ciccotelli admitted following Saturday’s game. “I was hoping we’d get the ball in his hands and something would happen.” But despite the setback on Saturday, Ciccotelli has high expectations for both Cattouse and Bedle as they take their skills to the next level. “I expect them to be impact players wherever they go,” he said. “They’re great kids and they’re great athletes. They’re true football players.” Not to be outdone, Keyport kicker Pete Czech ended his brilliant career with another solid performance, converting on his 59th and 60th PAT kicks of the season, and finished the year one point shy of tying a state record for points scored by a kicker in a season. BY DOUG McKENZIEStaff Writer last_img read more

Continue reading

Rooney header sends United top in Group B

first_imgA thumping header from Wayne Rooney ended Manchester United’s scoring drought and secured a 1-0 Champions League victory over CSKA Moscow as they went top of Group B on Tuesday.United had seemed to be heading for a fourth successive goalless draw before Rooney met a Jesse Lingard cross and sent a bullet header soaring past CSKA keeper Igor Akinfeev and into the roof of the net in the 79th minute.Despite dominating possession throughout the Old Trafford encounter, the home team had struggled to break down the resilient Russians whose own attacking ambitions were limited to infrequent counter attacks.United, who had previously failed to score in Premier League encounters against ManchesterCity and Crystal Palace as well as a League Cup clash against second tier Middlesbrough, mustered little more than half chances until Rooney’s winner.Sevilla 1Manchester City 3Real Madrid 1PSG 0Shakhtar Donetsk 4Malmo 0PSV 2Wolfsburg 0Astana 0Atletico Madrid 0Benfica 2Galatasaray 1B. M’gladbach 1Juventus 1last_img read more

Continue reading

New short film captures rare spider monkey feeding behavior (commentary)

first_imgA new short film captures rarely seen footage of endangered spider monkeys feeding at a mammal clay lick in the remote Peruvian Amazon.A Rainforest Reborn, a short documentary by filmmaker Eilidh Munro, was captured in the Crees Reserve, a regenerating rainforest within the Manu Biosphere Reserve, giving us hope that endangered species can return to previously disturbed forests.In this commentary, the filmmaker, Eilidh Munro, talks about the difficulties of filming spider monkeys in a rainforest and the importance of this story for conservation.This post is a commentary. The views expressed are those of the author, not necessarily Mongabay. Reaching the forest floor — far from the safety of the canopy — is a perilous voyage for any monkey, not to mention an inexperienced juvenile. Nonetheless, an integral feeding ritual means that canopy-dwelling spider monkeys must at times venture to the ground, and encourage their young to do so too.“A Rainforest Reborn” is a new short film revealing the rarely-seen feeding behavior of a group of endangered Peruvian spider monkeys (Ateles chamek) at a mammal clay lick. It follows a family of monkeys who must teach their young daughter how to access and eat this clay alone for the first time, even if it will be one of the most dangerous lessons of the young monkey’s life.“A Rainforest Reborn” was filmed at the Crees Reserve in the heart of the Manu Biosphere Reserve, a UNESCO world heritage site in Peru. Incredibly, this 650-hectare rainforest reserve is a regenerating, secondary forest; it was cleared for farming and selectively logged just 30 years ago. However, 87 percent of all biodiversity has returned, including endangered species like the spider monkey. Even species new to science have been discovered here.The seemingly bizarre behavior of eating clay is not particular to monkeys, nor mammals in general. In fact, macaw clay licks are somewhat emblematic of the Manu region, drawing thousands of birding tourists every year. While this is an incredibly interesting and at times extremely colorful display of animal behavior, the reason for it has remained a mystery. It may be that animals eat clay to neutralize their stomach and remove toxins from an otherwise acidic diet. Other studies have suggested that by eating clay, animals like spider monkeys are supplementing a sodium-poor diet, as the western Amazon basin is lacking in salt.Witnessing and filming this behavior by spider monkeys is rare. Due to hunting and habitat loss by deforestation, the species is under serious threat. The monkeys spend the majority of their lives in the top levels of the canopy, and by coming down to the forest floor they are exposing themselves to predators more adept at hunting on the ground. Capturing footage of this dangerous but essential feeding ritual is therefore incredible, and the fact it was captured in a regenerating rainforest makes it all the more inspiring and hopeful. However, it was also extremely challenging.A male spider monkey nervously watches for potential predators. Still from Eilidh Munro’s short documentary “A Rainforest Reborn,” produced for The Crees Foundation.For a start, the species lives 100 feet up in the tops of trees within a large area of rainforest. Add to that the uneasy partnership between tropical forest humidity and camera equipment, and things can get tricky.After spending an unsuccessful 40 hours in a hide, I took to looking through Crees Foundation’s data for incidental spider monkey sightings in order to find their nesting sites and the routes they commonly use for travelling through trees. For five weeks I then solo-trekked through the rainforest, walking slowly, listening carefully, and carrying 15 kilograms of equipment in dry bags to protect them from the humidity.To increase my chances, I also camped in an area where the monkeys were often spotted. Miraculously, this also turned out to be a nesting site for one family who I could film settling down for the night. However, the ground I filmed on was a steep slope in the thick of the forest undergrowth, with vines that wrap and strangle trees until they eventually fall, allowing light into the canopy and new species to grow. It was not ideal; I could barely see through the trees and my tripod legs were in a maze of vines and roots. What happened next should not be a surprise: a slip, a fall, and a snapped tripod leg.Now my daily solo-treks were coupled with the challenge of filming a level lower on my tripod. Thankfully, these efforts soon paid off when I met our family of monkeys using teamwork to guard and enter the clay lick.The Crees Reserve, Manu Biosphere Reserve, Peru. Photo courtesy of Eilidh Munro.To capture the activity, in a sheltered area, I set up my equipment as quickly as possible, so as to not miss the action or disturb the group. The monkeys were calling to one another, entering and leaving the clay lick, and the young monkey was communicating with her family. You can therefore imagine my horror when, despite the dry bags, I could not see a thing through the lens: it had been completely attacked by humidity! Thankfully, after a frantic five minutes of cleaning, the lens cleared up and I could finally film. With camera traps inside the clay lick itself, from three different angles, I could also capture the feeding without disturbing the monkeys or changing their natural behavior.Needless to say, the rainforest certainly doesn’t give away its secrets easily — and nor should it.The Manú Biosphere Reserve is one of the most biodiverse places on the planet, however it is also under serious threat from illegal logging, hunting, mining, agriculture, and the illegal construction of a new road. Striking a balance between development, improved health, and better opportunities for local people with conservation has always been difficult. However, it is crucial if endangered species like these spider monkeys are going to survive.The young spider monkey waiting for the signal to enter the clay lick. Still from Eilidh Munro’s short documentary “A Rainforest Reborn,” produced for The Crees Foundation.Eilidh Munro has spent the last year working as a filmmaker and photographer in the remote Peruvian Amazon, capturing rare animal behavior and footage of a species new to science. She co-created and ran the Crees Foundation’s first Multimedia Internship, an educational training program teaching courses in photography, filming, writing, and conservation communications. Eilidh’s next adventure will be a filming expedition to the Manu Biosphere Reserve, where her team seek perspectives on a controversial road being illegally built through the region. You can follow their expedition plans at voicesontheroadfilm.com, view Eilidh’s previous work at munrorambling.com or follow her on Instagram @eilidhmmunro.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Mike Gaworecki Animal Behavior, Animals, Commentary, Editorials, Environment, Mammals, Monkeys, Primates, Researcher Perspective Series, Video, Videos, Wildlife center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Continue reading

SGH to Partner with Dogliotti, Others

first_imgPresident Ellen Johnson Sirleaf has called on Seed Global Health (SGH) to enter into an arrangement with the A.M. Dogliotti College of Medicine at the University of Liberia (UL) and other medical training institutions in the country to train medical practitioners who will improve health services in the country. SGH is a United States based organization that seeks to strengthen health education in countries, such as Liberia, challenged by a shortage of health professionals. SGH had earlier expressed interest in working with Liberia.SGH leadership over the weekend disclosed its intention to work with the Liberian government when a four-member delegation led by its Chief Executive Officer (CEO), Dr. Vanessa Kerry, paid a courtesy call on the President in Monrovia.President Sirleaf said her administration welcomes the partnership and cooperation with SGH to enhance the country’s healthcare delivery capacities. She underscored the compelling need to provide training for doctors, physicians, nurses as well as mid-wives, adding, “The progress we desire to make must be the best quality to achieve lasting and impressive results.” She said SGH’s intervention in Liberia’s health sector, through the deployment of experienced medical volunteers in partnership with U.S. Peace Corps would tremendously impact the building of a resilient health system in Liberia.The President also encouraged SGH to explore cooperation in the water and sanitation sector, particularly working with schools to ensure facilities are established and sustainably maintained for the good of the students.Dr. Vanessa Kerry said her organization will work with Liberia to help meet its long-term health care and human resource needs. This, she noted, would be done through the Global Health Service Partnership (GHSP) initiative. GHSP is a public-private collaboration between SGH, the Peace Corps and the US President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR). The SGH, Dr. Kerry said, brings a rich experience and knowledge of medical and nursing education to resource limited settings. “We provide expertise in site selection and applicant recruitment in addition to coordinating orientation and training, field support, monitoring and evaluation, and debt repayment stipends with expertise to identify effective teaching sites,” Dr. Kerry said.Dr. Kerry, whose team had been in the country working with the Ministry of Health in areas that require quick interventions, expressed gratitude to President Sirleaf for the audience. While in the country, the SGH team visited the Phebe Hospital in Bong County, Cuttington University in Suakoko, J.F.K. Medical Center, the Tubman National Institute for Medical Arts (TNIMA), as well as the Mother Patern College of Health Sciences.Meanwhile, USA Peace Corps Africa Regional Director, Dick Day, has praised the authorities at the Ministry of Health for the kind of structures already in place, which he said are vital for assisting partners interested in making critical interventions in the heath sector. Mr. Day, U.S. Chargé d’Affaires Mark Boulware and Peace Corps Liberia Director Kevin Fleming accompanied Dr. Vanessa Kerry.Established in 2012, the GHSP program is a novel federal initiative addressing vast shortages of health professionals in many parts of the world.The GHSP commits to helping increase clinical care capacities and strengthening health systems in resource-limited settings by cultivating the next generation of local doctors and nurses. The program places US health professionals alongside local medical and nursing faculty counterparts to meet the teaching needs identified at each partner institution.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Continue reading

“Animal Spirits” and institutionalism

first_imgthe consequences of the Brexit vote by Britain will take years to sort out, especially since the Government still has not officially triggered negotiations on the terms of withdrawal as specified by Article 50 of the European Union’s Lisbon Treaty. But while almost every country in the world will be affected to a lesser or greater extent by the decision, the underlying rationales that undergirded Britain and the other European countries’ formation of their union will now have to be re-examined by other countries that followed their putatively positive example. Notably, the Caribbean and Caricom.The EU emerged out of war-ravaged Europe in which Germany had been comprehensively defeated and in fact split into two parts that mirrored Europe itself that now had distinct eastern and western ideologically defined “blocs”. The Allies, led by the US, decided to “rebuild Europe” by creating new institutions to develop its western bloc. The economic model to achieve this goal was “capitalist/free market” in orientation. They began by forming the European Coal and Steel Community in 1950 to unite their member countries economically. In 1957, this was then transformed by the Treaty of Rome which created the European Economic Community (EEC), or ‘Common Market’.The development of new institutions to deepen the integration further politically continued as Britain started an expansion drive when it joined the EC in 1973. The Maastricht Treaty (1993), Amsterdam Treaty (1999) and the Lisbon Treaty (2009) were all supposed to create a European Union. This would have members operating as independent countries but each conceding a tremendous amount of sovereignty by forming a single market, which, in the main, used a single currency (the Euro) and allowed free movement of goods, capital, services and people between member states.Underlying these institutions was the assumption that the rules undergirding them served to advance the “greater good” of all its members. And it is actually this premise that was on trial in the referendum that resulted in Brexit. The question, of course, is who decides what is the “greater good” – the leaders who the people elect to be their representatives or the people themselves? The answer given last week is a majority of voters (52%) disagreed with their elected leaders that the EU served their interests. The leader of the Conservative Government has resigned and there is great pressure for his opposite number on the Labour benches to follow suit.While there may have been any number of issues which convinced voters that to remain within the EU was not in their interest, nativist fears were the clinching factor. “Nativism” describes the primal fears of “swamping” that are raised against immigrants or newcomers who are blamed for everything that ails the body politic in a country – from crime to economic slumps. The flood of three million immigrants into Britain after 2004 from Eastern Europe, which had been in the Communist bloc but were then absorbed into the EU, created a groundswell of opinion that rejected the economic argument that were made by most leaders for staying in Europe.Nativism is not a new phenomenon and in the US during the 19th Century there was great agitation against Irish migration into the country which is now mirrored in present-day anger against Latin Americans. At other times, there were anti-Catholic sentiments. But nativism is only one of what Lord Maynard Keynes called “animal spirits” that act against “rational” behaviour on which all institutions are founded.If one were to consider only the rational economic arguments made for remaining in the EU – economies of scales in marketing in the vast European market, sharing in defence spending, being part of a large bloc that can deal more assuredly with other power blocs, etc – then maybe the vote should have gone the way most leaders thought it would.But leaders have to accept that the rational bases of institutions can sometimes have unintended consequences, “due to animal spirits”. Such as Brexit.last_img read more

Continue reading

Roberto Martinez blasts ‘disrespectful’ Chelsea over John Stones and says Everton are NOT a selling club

first_imgRoberto Martinez has told talkSPORT he is disappointed by the ‘disrespectful’ manner in which Chelsea are attempting to sign John Stones from Everton.Jose Mourinho has made no secret of his desire to land the defender this summer, while John Terry this week claimed that the 21-year-old would be an excellent signing and could replace him in the long-term.Terry’s comments in particular irked Martinez, whose side have rejected two bids for Stones from Chelsea, with the Toffees boss telling the Alan Brazil Sports Breakfast: “It is illegal.“There are laws in the Premier League that tell you very clearly you can’t talk about players at other clubs.“It is coming across in a really disrespectful manner. It is not down to me to judge, that is down to the authorities – the laws of the game are there for a reason.”Chelsea remain confident of luring Stones away from Goodison Park, despite failing with a second bid of £26million.But Martinez, who has admitted the England international has been affected by the Premier League champions’ interest, insists the Merseyside club have no desire to cash in.“We don’t want to sell anyone,” he said.“We are not a selling club. We have been working really hard to have stability financially and that means we want to build on what we have.”Martinez, does, however, understand why Mourinho is so determined to sign Stones, as he rates the former Barnsley youngster as one of Europe’s hottest prospects.“He is a typical modern centre-half and has the potential to be one of the best,” he said.“His qualities, his personality, his character, we are in front of one of the most special young players in European football.”last_img read more

Continue reading

Van Gaal wants horny Red Devils: ‘Well they’ve been getting rogered all season’

first_img1 Louis van Gaal has called upon his Manchester United players to be “horny”.No, this is not a joke.CLICK HERE TO READ ALL ABOUT VAN GAAL’S ‘HORNY’ COMMENTSBut fortunately, the internet exists for people to make jokes out of just such ridiculous moments in life.Check out a selection of the reaction to Van Gaal’s bizarre comment. Louis van Gaal and Ryan Giggs: not horny last_img

Continue reading

Kelly’s Centra in Mountain Top just got a whole lot more convenient!

first_imgKelly’s Centra in Mountain Top has launched a new ‘Beat the Queue’ service that is ideal for customers who lead hectic lifestyles and want to grab their lunch when on the go. The ‘Beat the Queue’ service allows customers to order and pay for their lunch ahead of time and choose when to collect it; their order will then be ready when they arrive to the store, no queuing required!Customers can avail of this free service by ordering online via centra.ie or through the ‘Centra Beat the Queue’ app. This handy service enables customers to order from the full Centra lunch range such as gourmet sandwiches, hot food and salads, as well as an array of snacks and drinks. Time-pressed customers pay in advance so no time is wasted queuing or at the till; they can simply collect their lunch from the designated collection point in store and go.Mairtin Kelly of Kelly’s Centra Mountain Top said: ‘We’re delighted to offer this service to our time pressed customers. We are hugely customer and community focused, with customer service always remaining at the heart of our store. However we know sometimes our shoppers are time pressed, so we are helping them make the most of their day with this convenient service.”Kelly’s Centra in Mountain Top is the first Centra in Donegal to offer this service and it’s the first of its kind for a convenience store in Donegal. Customers place their order a minimum of 10 minutes in advance, with just a €2 minimum spend on using the service. As well as this, if a customer knows that tomorrow is going to be a hectic day, they can pre-order their lunch for the next day. Not only does it save customers time, it also gives back! Kelly’s Centra are giving €2 off the first order the customer places through the app. Further to this, for every ten orders a user places through the app, they get their 11th order free.Download the ‘Centra Beat the Queue’ app today or see centra.ie/btq for full details.The app is free to download through Google Play and the App store.Kelly’s Centra in Mountain Top just got a whole lot more convenient! was last modified: June 9th, 2017 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:beat the queueCentraKelly’s of Mountain Toplast_img read more

Continue reading

Holiday toy drive expands efforts

first_img“These kids are taking care of their moms, and they don’t have chance to be children,” Markell said. “So to have toys at Christmas time, these kids can be children.” araceli.esparza@sgvn.com (562) 698-0955, Ext. 3024160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! WHITTIER – For the past six years, local volunteer Chris Rodriguez and Uptown Whittier chiropractor Sheila Harrod have held a holiday toy drive for abused children and needy families in East Los Angeles. Harrod waives her co-payments – which range from $10 to $25 – for patients who bring in toys for the Bienvenidos Family Services center in East Los Angeles, while Rodriguez helps distribute them to the center’s children. But this holiday, Rodriguez and Harrod are dreaming bigger. They’re raising toy donations for two additional nonprofit groups – Angel Step Inn in Pico Rivera, and Maryvale in Rosemead. “These children are going through hard times. They can’t fend for themselves,” Rodriguez, 41, said. “Most of these kids, they’ve never had a Christmas. … We’re trying to get them two gifts each this year.” AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORESurfer attacked by shark near Channel Islands calls rescue a ‘Christmas miracle’Angel Step Inn serves battered, substance-addicted women and their children, while Maryvale offers residential treatment programs for girls. Bienvenidos Family Services offers support programs for needy families. Rodriguez, a Pico Rivera resident, is soliciting more Whittier doctors to give up their patient fees in exchange for a child’s gift this holiday. Toy drive organizers also need the public’s support to meet their goal of collecting 500 gifts for children. Most donations traditionally come in just before Christmas, but if donations are made sooner, “I know we could get more,” Rodriguez said. The toy drive began this week and will continue through Dec. 23. Organizers are collecting gifts for newborns through teenagers. Lisa Markell, director of public relations at Angel Step Inn, said Christmas gifts will invoke joy in children who have become “parentified.” last_img read more

Continue reading

The Current State of the Security Industry

first_imgEDITORS NOTE: Steven C. Millwee, CPP, is president and CEO of SecurTest, Inc., a national crisis management and applicant-screening firm based in Tampa, Florida. He is author of The SecurTest System, which consists of over 220 applicant and employment questionnaires that focus on workplace violence, theft, work performance, criminal history, and current illegal drug use. He is also coauthor with labor attorney John-Edward Alley of The Threat from Within: Workplace Violence.Millwee volunteers much of his time to industry-related activities. He is currently president of ASIS International, formerly the American Society for Industrial Security International. It is from this perspective that Millwee offers his insights into the challenges and opportunities facing the security and loss prevention industry.EDITOR: As president of ASIS, tell us what that organization is all about and what it means to you to be president?- Sponsor – MILLWEE: First, let me say that being president of ASIS International is probably the most humbling experience one could go through. To have your peers in the worlds largest security organization elect you to be their president through the board of directors is an awesome opportunity that gives a volunteer leader the opportunity to leave a lasting legacy.The second aspect of being president is that it really accentuates the absolute necessity of a leader to practice the daily art of collaboration and delegation.Within our headquarters, we have over seventy employees who are extremely well-trained, competent professionals, who know their jobs well. An effective leader doesnt have to micromanage the day-to-day process in his or her organization. He needs to tap into the talents and resources that the staff brings to the table.Also within ASIS we have over 200 chapters around the world with 32,000 members. I have to appoint about 140 volunteer leaders to head up councils, to be regional vice presidents, to serve on the Professional Certification Board Foundation, and other areas of responsibility. By the time its all done, I have an army of about 1,200 volunteer leaders around the world who are willing and able to step up to the plate to serve their members. By utilizing that army of resources, the president has a tremendous opportunity to do those things that have the greatest impact for the security industry.EDITOR: How would you describe the mission of ASIS?MILLWEE: ASIS was originally founded primarily for Department of Defense security managers back in the early 1950s. The core value has continually been to provide educational resources to its members. Since September 11, we have added several additional measures to our mission. The first is to become an advocacy group before Congress and other legislative bodies as well as businesses around the world. This is to allow us to take future-focused, forward-thinking positions on issues that impact a security professional today. Thats very unusual, quite frankly, for ASIS, having primarily been an educational-oriented professional society. But thats so important in the post-9/11 world, because government and industry are looking for true experts in loss prevention, security, and every function related to those areas.EDITOR: As you know, the readership of LossPrevention magazine is primarily the LP professional in the retail, grocery, and convenience store markets. ASIS is a very broad organization. How does ASIS serve those and other vertical segments of the industry?MILLWEE: Within the structure of ASIS, we have over thirty councils that have particular areas of focus or expertise. For instance, we have a retail security council whose mission is to provide educational sessions for the retail loss prevention professional at our annual convention and throughout the year. There are also other disciplines, such as lodging, resort and hospitality, gaming and casinos, and a whole host of other councils.EDITOR: Tell us a little bit about the upcoming annual convention.MILLWEE: Our annual seminars and exhibits are September 10 13 this year in Philadelphia. It is the largest professional, educational event for security in the world today. Between exhibitors and registrants, the average attendance over the past five years is well over 15,000 and has been as high as almost 30,000. A person attending doesnt have to be a member of ASIS to take advantage of over 140 educational sessions along with other general sessions that will help that person go back to his or her constituency and begin to implement some new, innovative processes to help them in the functions of their day-to-day jobs.EDITOR: Apart from the educational sessions, what do you find valuable in attending the annual conference?MILLWEE: The second greatest value to me is that over the years, you develop a whole new network of resources where you can turn to help you in your job. A true professional doesnt have all the answers, but he does know where to find the answers. Whether its in ASIS or other similar organizations, one of the greatest values of being involved is that network of colleagues who give you that broad spectrum of outreach to find those solutions.To me, personally, I get a tremendous amount from the educational seminars, because they are conducted by the best and the brightest in our profession. We have a vetting process where we narrow down some 2,000 submissions to 140 or so sessions. We look for high-caliber speakers, who have proven expertise and new and innovative ideas that will keep the security practitioner fresh.In addition, the exhibit hall gives you an opportunity to see the latest offerings from a huge number of security manufacturers and service providers.EDITOR: Its interesting that your annual seminar this year is in Philadelphia, the birthplace of our country, and coincides with the one-year anniversary of September 11th. Has this drawn any questions or concerns?MILLWEE: Someone early on asked if we shouldnt move the convention to another week. Here was my reply. If ever theres a time for security practitioners and professionals from around the world to band together, its this week. On September 11th some thirty security officers, managers, and professionals were at their posts, doing their jobs at the World Trade Center. They were the true first responders to the acts of terrorism. They stood their ground and led thousands of people to safety while leading firefighters and police officers into all of the various facilities in the World Trade Center complex. It was by no accident that these security professionals shed their blood along with their brothers and sisters who wear uniforms. They did their jobs. They enacted their crisis management plans and as a result, saved thousands of lives that could have made a catastrophic event even worse. This will be a time in Philadelphia not only to pay respect to those who lost their lives, but also to bring a sense of camaraderie within our profession. We are truly the professionals charged with protection of people, places, and information around the globe.EDITOR: When youre not being the president of ASIS, how do you occupy your time?MILLWEE: That is probably the greatest challenge I have, because Im a basketball coach, Sunday school teacher, and chief executive officer for SecurTest,the company I founded 24 years ago. SecurTest is focused on developing biographical questionnaires to help employers screen applicants for work-related issues, such as violence in the workplace, theft, current drug use, work performance, sexual harassment, and a whole host of other bad behaviors. We have over 220 standardized questionnaires, which we also customize for our clients. In addition, I provide security consulting services, primarily in the area of workplace violence intervention or prevention.EDITOR: What is the breadth of your client base?MILLWEE: On the consulting side, we work with every type of industry segment, because workplace violence attacks everybody. A tremendous amount of the training is, of course, in the retail segment, because when you are dealing with customers, you not only have the internal threat of disgruntled employees, you have the external threat from robbery or other types of violent crimes crossing the threshold of your business.Within our testing marketplace, our core clientele falls within three primary groups convenience stores and fast foods, retail, and security officers.EDITOR: Take us back to when you first began your career and how you grew to be the CEO of your present company?MILLWEE: Well, I started out as a farm boy in Oklahoma, driving a tractor at age six. I left it running at age 17 and ran away. I think it took my dad two weeks to realize that I had abandoned the farm. Actually, I went to the FBI as a clerk right out of high school. I was with the FBI for two years before becoming an officer with the sheriff s department in Tampa. I quickly became a detective and eventually head of the unsolved murder unit working the cold-case squad and serial murder investigations.I had a tremendous friend in the sheriff s office, Walter Henrich, who along with my father were two significant mentors of my life. As a result of their encouragement, at the age of 25 I decided to start SecurTest. Initially, the firm was primarily an investigations and polygraph firm. But over the years, effective businesses have to find either a niche market or adapt to the trends in the marketplace, so that you can retool yourself to provide the types of service or products that customers will buy. Theres an old adage that if a customer is not willing to buy what you have to sell, perhaps youre not selling the right product. My father put it this way, Steve, you have to know where people itch in order to know where to scratch them. So, over the years weve evolved from the investigative organization to a more senior-level consulting firm and have carved out a nice niche for our products and testing services.EDITOR: In your view, what has been the impact of September 11 on the security industry?MILLWEE:The biggest impact Ive observed is that the highest levels of organizations, the senior executives and board of directors around the world,have a renewed focus on the security professionals job. When you talk to senior executives and ask them for their top five objectives of the year, safety and security of their employees, customers, and guests are certainly in that top five, if not number one. Those acts of terrorism that day and those ongoing acts of terrorism around the world since then, highlight one of the core needs of mankind, which is safety for ourselves and our families. Successful and effective organizations look at their employees and customers as their extended family. Providing a safe workplace has been accentuated by those acts. Executives today are now paying more attention, giving greater resources, and more opportunities for budgetary considerations to the security and loss prevention professional than, I think, has ever been seen in the history of the security industry. That requires the security professional to truly understand his or her function, and to be able to speak the language of business to maximize that opportunity.EDITOR:What about the effect of the more recent corporate accounting scandals and breaches of ethics?MILLWEE:One thing I see is that it has created the opportunity to have ethics and compliance reside where I think it should have always been, in the hands of the competent security professional. Most security professionals understand the need for a strict compliance to a code of ethics. The function of oversight has to start at the president, CEO, or chairman of an organization, but that person has to have a competent group of individuals to oversee how those ethical standards are going to be implemented down into the grass roots of an organization.We have lived for the past 10 years or so in a me generation, where society was focused on individual needs. I perceive we are now coming back to the moral principles of how we should conduct ourselves individually and as a business. The security professional has the opportunity to become more aware and educated on how to develop ethical compliance and oversight accountability within their organization. By taking on this responsibility, security executives will gain even greater visibility within their organization.EDITOR:How does anLP or security professional balance September 11 and these ethical issues with the current soft economy?MILLWEE: Its critical to know your time, talent, and resources. Within an organization of even a modest size, you have a tremendous amount of talent. The more you know about that talent base, the more you can utilize those people, not only to achieve buy-in for what you are trying to achieve, but to use them as messengers and advocates for your program. Once you have their buy-in, you can create accountability processes among your management team so that they help hold each other accountable.EDITOR: With the changes and opportunities evolving in our industry, what advice would you give young people about preparing themselves for a career in loss prevention or security?MILLWEE:There are two essential answers to that. First is find yourself a mentor. Be selective in who you let mentor you. Ive had three. First was my father. My second mentor, who had a tremendous impact on my law enforcement career, was Walter Henrich. He was very patient and would take the time to explain things to me when I was a relatively immature person in a very responsible position. The third person has had a significant influence in my ASIS leadership development. His name is Raymond Humphrey, CPP. Ray was past president two years ago and a tremendous mentor, not just of me, but to dozens of others in the industry. He possesses not only the skill sets of leadership and understanding human behavior, but he has the ability to cut through the weeds and get to the strategic level.Everybody needs mentors, whether they are coming right out of college or entering the industry as a second career. But theres a responsibility that comes with mentoring. If you are being mentored, that means you are a protge. And at some point, the protge has to take the reins and become someone elses mentor.EDITOR: Whats the second piece of advice?MILLWEE: The second is education, education, education. A true leader is not defined by what he or she knows. The true leader is defined by their desire to be on the continuum of educational development. Real leaders continually seek out educational opportunities to improve what they may already know, or to refresh their memory of what they’ve already learned. To learn new innovative ideas that help them grow. Thats the mark of a leader. If a person right out of college follows that track, they will go far.EDITOR: One of the major educational offerings of ASIS is the certified protection professional (CPP) designation. How did that come about and what does it mean for a loss prevention or security professional?MILLWEE: We have just recently added to the designation of CPP to better explain the meaning of it. We now brand it as CPP, Board Certified in Security Management. What does that mean to the average security professional? One, it demonstrates to themselves and their colleagues that they have a level of experience and proven level of competency to address the general landscape of security questions today. It demonstrates that they have devoted the time and resources to study for a very extensive and exhaustive examination. Thats very important in todays world, because there are more and more people in the marketplace who are holding themselves up as experts in security or loss prevention, but simply do not have the expertise. They are attempting to seize an opportunity because of the growth of security, and they want to jump on the bandwagon.EDITOR: Is CPP the only certification offered by ASIS?MILLWEE:Later this year or early next year, youll see two additional certifications that ASIS will introduce. One is a certification in physical security and the other is a certification in investigations.EDITOR: For those who are unfamiliar with CPP, what does it take to earn this certification?MILLWEE: You can go online to www.ASISonline.org to see the exact requirements, but you have to have a certain number of years experience in the field, which can be reduced by your higher education. Once you have the minimum amount of education and/or experience, you can sit for the exam. The test consists of roughly 200 core questions on a broad range of security and legal issues.EDITOR: Who should consider getting their CPP certification?MILLWEE:When people ask me if they should even try for the CPP, I use myself as an example. I became a member of ASIS in 1979. I did not take the CPP test until 1995. As a CEO of a corporation, I always considered the CPP something for those practitioners who have security as part of their day-to-day job. Then in 1995, I became the chairman of the Tampa ASIS chapter and found myself standing up in front of people promoting the CPP program, and, as my dad would say, You ain’t one. That gave me the motivation to study for the test.What I did was commit six months of my spare time to study the core subject matter. Because the CPP demonstrates that you have a broad understanding of the whole spectrum of security, there were areas I knew well and other not so well. For example, when it came to loss prevention issues, I felt very comfortable with my knowledge. With interviewing and interrogation, I had a good understanding because of my past experience teaching that subject to law enforcement. On the other hand, with physical security, I was clueless. That was not my expertise. So I had to spend more time studying physical security. But at the end of the day, I not only had a new appreciation for those colleagues who are physical security experts, but I was also able to develop a tremendous amount of knowledge and resources to help me when those issues come up. And those issues do come up in the day-to-day lives of a loss prevention professional. If it only gives you the ability to go find the answers, that alone will raise your star in the eyes of the management in your organization.EDITOR: Would you recommend the CPP for the retail loss prevention professional?MILLWEE: Absolutely! The loss prevention manager today really has to be a multifaceted security professional, versus just solely focused on loss prevention. An entry-level or mid-level LP professional may be mainly tasked with the day-to-day preventive aspects of implementing a loss prevention program. But certainly the upper- and senior-level professionals need to be fully versed on every aspect of security, whether it is personnel security for your employees, customers, and guests or understanding the physical security of the entire infrastructure of your organization. At least in my experience, in the boardrooms today, the senior loss prevention executive needs to not only understand the value of the apprehension side of LP, but also have a holistic understanding of securing the entire corporate organization.EDITOR: Any last thoughts before we close?MILLWEE:I just want to emphasize and encourage everyone to give back to their profession. Its easy for someone to sit in the bleachers and watch the game, either to be content with the way the game is being played or to argue with the officials, players, or coaches on the field. I would invite all loss prevention and security professionals to get into the game. We dont need spectators, we need players. We need people who are willing to give up their time, talents, and resources, as well as companies who are willing to support their security and loss prevention professionals in this endeavor. Get involved in helping make our industry better each and every day. Stay UpdatedGet critical information for loss prevention professionals, security and retail management delivered right to your inbox.  Sign up nowlast_img read more

Continue reading