Apoel take decisive step towards their fifth consecutive title

first_imgApoel moved closer to a fifth consecutive championship title after their easy 4-1 win over AEL in Limassol while AEK defeated Apollon and kept alive their (slim) chances of overhauling the leaders. In the relegation group Doxa Katokopias remain rooted at the bottom following their loss to Aris but are still in with a fighting chance as their nearest rivals, Karmiotissa, also lost, leaving the three point difference unchanged.Apoel suddenly burst to life against AEL after a run of disappointing displays and poor results and this despite having a host of key players unavailable through injury or suspension.Vander Viera opened the score in the 17th minute after a great solo run and then the same player set up Embezilio to double the score before the break.Apoel’s Pieros Sotiriou, who had failed to find the net in his last 6 league games, managed to score twice in the final fifteen minutes with AEL’s only response a late Mitrea penalty.In a tense and cagey game a late goal by AEK’s Acoran was enough to give the home side the precious three points against Apollon.A decimated by injuries and suspensions Anorthosis defied the odds and defeated Omonia by 4-3 despite having to come back from behind twice.In the relegation group, a goal by Aris’ Antoniou in the first half against Doxa eased the Limassol’s teams relegation worries while Ermis’ Martynyuk gave the group leaders the three points against Karmiotissa.In the final group game Ethnikos defeated Nea Salamina thanks to a Nick Kacharave goal early on in the game.Next weekend both the title and the final relegation spot may be decided as Apoel face AEK, the Nicosia team needing a win to clinch the title while Karmiotssia can secure their first division status if they defeat Doxa Katokopias.FOOTBALL HIGHLIGHTS – Round 7last_img read more

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Greenland calls for more targeted athlete endorsements

first_imgSenior Vice President of Operations and Marketing at GraceKennedy Money Services, Noel Greenland, has said that brands and athletes who endorse them, should put more focus on selling their products in what he describes as a “unique way.” Greenland was speaking at the Regional Conference On The Strategic Use of Intellectual Property In Sport, yesterday. He said that he has noticed that brands are failing to effectively make an imprint on the minds of consumers because their marketing strategies are not memorable enough. He said that many brands are too focused on just getting star athletes aligned with their products, rather than choosing athletes who have relevance to what they are trying to market. “When a talent (athlete) is overexposed to the point where that talent is used on multiple products, it doesn’t bring the same weight,” Greenland said. “To the consumers it’s almost like ‘Oh, that’s just another ad.’ He mentioned that many television viewers do not even watch many commercials during programme breaks because of this, and advertisers lose money as a result, because of how much they have spent to produce these commercials. “I don’t like those types of sponsorship,” he said. “Your message is invariably lost after a week or two.” Greenland said that in order to establish what he calls a “perfect brand,” advertisers need to figure out their target audience. “It will not come because the athlete is the fastest in the world, or because the athlete is the best looking athlete, or the best shaped body. “The test should be ‘Who am I targeting best?’ I believe if we sell the right product to the right demographic, that demographic will use that product well. I would want to use talent that can appeal and speak a language that the audience will be enticed by.” The conference took place over two days at the Jamaica Conference Centre in downtown Kingston and featured presentations on the protection of copyright on the Internet, broadcasting and media rights and sports, broadcast piracy, digital media, infringement of rights relating to sports, use of athletes as brand ambassadors, and strategies to develop sponsorship, merchandising and trade related to sports intellectual property. Olympian Veronica Campbell Brown spoke about athletes including herself, recognising that their career is their business. “Veronica Campbell-Brown is not just a name but also a brand that my team and I had to protect and enhance by our actions,” she said. “At the end of the day, it was my sole responsibility to be responsible in the way I approach training sessions, competitions, and my conduct on and off the track. This enabled my team to better assist carrying out my vision and help me gain success. Winning medals led to higher fees, respect and more exposure.” Sprint icon Asafa Powell made several presentations to Sport minister Olivia Grange. One of these was his training jacket and running shorts from the London Olympics for the Jamaica 55 Anniversary time capsule. His running spikes from the same Games were contributed to the National Sport Museum and he also presented Grange with products from his new line of deodorants and training bands. He said that some of the proceeds from the merchandise will go towards breast and prostate cancer research.last_img read more

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Marked success in education sector

first_imgEducation provides one of the main planks for the pursuit of enhanced lives and lifestyles. The ability to read is critical to student success, as well as lifelong earning potential and economic security.In spite of the many and various challenges facing Guyana in the delivery of services in the various sectors, when one focuses on the education sector – one can see marked success in the programmes initiated by past and present Governments to deliver quality education to all of Guyana’s children and provide equitable opportunities for all in the pursuit of upward mobility.A primary initiative in the education system that has created successes in the education sector was the establishment of the multimedia centre at the National Centre for Educational Resource Development (NCERD), with one of the centre’s main activities being the production and broadcast on television of educational programmes. The learning television channel is dedicated to broadcasting programmes throughout the country via the use of satellite communications technology. Broadcasting commenced in 2011 and has proven a great success story.Additionally, organisational capacity and managerial capability have been enhanced, strengthening the management of the education sector and central ministry.Focus has been placed on achieving improved educational outcomes through a continuum of policy reviews, initiation of new programmes and initiatives, promoting improved performance management, and monitoring mechanisms geared to ensure that the goals of the Education Strategic Plan were achieved.Teacher training has been also enhanced with the introduction of the Associate Degree in Education (ADE), for which an initial batch of 426 persons enrolled and commenced training at the Cyril Potter College of Education, along with other teachers in training.Teachers have been benefiting from continuous development programmes, especially in special training for Maths and English teachers who participate in the non-graduate programmes.Efforts to support the advances made in Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) at the school and post-secondary levels have also borne fruit, as well as in the field of Information Communication Technology (ICT), where teachers receive basic training in the use of computers, with a project of equipping computer labs completed. As such, there have been great strides in ensuring the professionalisation of the teaching force.In the student community, remediation programmes to facilitate improved Maths and English scores are an ongoing facet of quality education.There have been stringent efforts to promote child-friendly schools, including enhancements to the school buildings; sanitation blocks; health, nutrition and counselling services; revitalising the PTAs; community outreaches, student councils and inclusive education. These elements facilitate the realisation of child-friendly schools.However, irrespective of the efforts of Government, the development of Guyana’s children needs cooperative partnership between parents and educational mentors, so parents need to recognise that their support and participation are integral to the holistic development of their children so that they can emerge as rounded adults primed to engage and overcome the challenges of adulthood.last_img read more

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Opposing ethnic killing wave

first_imgDear Editor,There is a lot in a name and we need to get names right. Assuming that our President David Granger and the majority of us Guyanese would welcome one (or more) Commission of Inquiry (CoI), which would provide our nation an understanding, as true as can be, and would take us along a path of revelation, redemption, resolution and reconciliation, then the names we start with and the terms of reference are important.The term ‘Jagdeo era killings’, which has even been repeated by President Granger, is to be regretted, as it is misleading.That submerged subterranean killing wave has its origin in the rejection of the People’s Progressive Party/Civic (PPP/C) win at our 1997 election by an opposing and extreme criminal fringe with ethno-political pretensions and links, which, when our national security forces were not having any success in apprehending them, evoked a similar irregular counter-force.The period from1998 to 2008 should be enquired into as a whole and that would naturally be in chronological sequence. One cannot help, but be suspicious of the coalition Government’s move in embarking on enquires into spliced-out pieces, starting near the end and proceeding in an order known only to themselves.Starting at the end indicates an attempt to negate and escape the logical deductions, which would be inherent in a chronological review of events over that period. The period from 1998 to 2008 was one of great testing of our peoples and our country. Rather than make it appear that Jagdeo and/or the PPP/C was the cause of those troubles, I submit, that it should be recognised that our (PPP/C) handling of that period, though criticised from many directions, saw our nation through as a whole avoiding the intensified polarisation, which was intended by the opposing and extreme criminal fringe with ethno-political pretensions and links.Editor, you may recall the rising tensions in our country as our 1997 (December 16) elections approached. I was President then. Our National Poet, Mr Martin Carter, had died earlier that month and our (PPP/C) Prime Minister and Presidential Candidate, Mrs Janet Jagan, was being particularly hounded by crowds as she sought to pay her respects at the various ceremonies honouring her colleague of many decades. On her way to Mr Carter’s internment at ‘Seven Ponds’, she was advised to pause at the Office of the President and she sat with me. She revealed that it seemed to her that we were re-running the 1957 to 1961 period – that after the uproar at the PPP win in 1957, the people of Georgetown, overwhelmingly Afro-Guyanese and supporters of the People’s National Congress (PNC) at that time, settled into a toleration of the PPP Government, but as the elections of 1961 approached with prospects of another PPP win in their consciousness, they just couldn’t take it and all hell seemed to break out!As it happened, we, the PPP/C, did win the 1997 Elections and all hell did break loose with the ‘slow fyah. Mo fyah’ campaign, marches, lootings, burnings and beatings – all against a background of charges by PNC supporters that: (i) we, the PPP/C, had rigged the election; and (ii) that the electoral system was unfair as the PPP/C would always win a fair and free election.Ravi Dev, who in his continual search for a way forward for our country and his empathy with this ‘African Insecurity Dilema’, had once put himself in some form of association with the PNC-Reform, within and without Parliament, writes in a recent column that: “This Friday will mark the 20th anniversary of the January 12, 1998 ethnic riots, when more than 200 Indian-Guyanese were beaten and assaulted in the streets of Georgetown by members of the African-Guyanese community, in full view of the Police, yet no arrests were made. The riots followed PNC protests against the PPP’s victory in the December 1997 elections”.Following the 2001 jailbreak and their projection by key political factions as ‘Freedom Fighters’, the attacks on assumed supporters of the PPP/C were taken to a higher level. When the national security forces showed remarkable inability to apprehend them, it was inevitable that a similar irregular counter-force emerged.We have been reminded by our President about the seeming compelling evidence about one of my colleagues, sitting with me at Cabinet, obtaining and providing high-tech equipment to the phantom force. We could be reminded similarly about that conversation (illegally taped, yes) between a then Vice Chairman of the PNC and the Commissioner of Police in which the then PNCR Vice Chairman thanked the then Commissioner of Police for a number of things, including misleading his police team on the killings at Agricola. When that tape surfaced my colleague, Gail Teixeira, then the Honourable Home Affairs Minister, was assailed by our Cabinet enquiring what the then Police Commission was saying about that conversation. She reported that he did not refute that the voice was his but that he was playing along the VC to learn what the PNC knew and was thinking. And today that former Commissioner of Police and that former PNCR Vice Chairman are in President Granger’s Cabinet as Minister of Citizenship and Attorney General, respectively.Editor, most of us Guyanese have been focused, for decades, on making a steadily better living and would be hard put to recall every significant event, every turn during this period in correct sequence. Hopefully, any of us, would be able to put hands on storages of our four newspapers, which taken together should give a fair picture of events as they occurred.We, PPP/C stayed away from holding a Commission of Inquiry, waiting on a time when it could have been healing. And we would have expected that such a CoI would have been structured similarly to the one established by our Government in consultation with the then Opposition, to enquire into the 2012 disturbances in Linden, with international Commissioners and nominees of various national stakeholders.There is a common saying in an eastern country, that the East wind is blowing and the West wind is blowing and who knows which will prevail?All through this period, the winds for division were blowing strong but we, the PPP/C have been heartened that all along this period, too, there have been occasions when Indo-Guyanese have acknowledged assistance and protection from Afro-Guyanese and vice-versa. The sense of being Afro or Indo or Amerindian or whatever though slowly, is gradually and steadily being encompassed in the sense of being human and being Guyanese.Enough said.Yours truly,Samuel A A Hindslast_img read more

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Burnley defender off to Orient

first_imgBurnley defender Luke O’Neill has joined Leyton Orient on an emergency loan deal.O’Neill only signed a new two-year deal with the Premier League club last summer but has struggled to make his breakthrough into the first-team and was sent out on loan to Scunthorpe earlier in the season.The 22-year-old will now join the east London club until May 3 and will be hoping to help Orient move away from the foot of the table. Luke O’Neill 1last_img

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Youth job fair expects hundreds

first_imgSIMI VALLEY – More than 1,200 job seekers are expected to attend the 20th annual Youth Employment Service Job and Career Fair April 22 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Boys and Girls Club of Simi Valley, 2850 Lemon Drive. The fair is a free community service offered to the public by the city of Simi Valley and sponsored by Countrywide Financial and the Boys and Girls Club. It offers people between 16 and 22 years old a chance to meet with hundreds of prospective employers. Businesses interested in registering for the fair can contact Laura Magness, the city’s Youth Employment Service coordinator, at 522-4473. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREOregon Ducks football players get stuck on Disney ride during Rose Bowl event – Daily News Support sought for Revlon run WESTLAKE VILLAGE – The Wellness Community in eastern Ventura County is asking local businesses to help fight women’s cancers by forming corporate teams to join the Wellness Community Valley/Ventura’s group in the 13th Annual RJJevlon Run/Walk for Women. The 5-K event will take place May 13 at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum/Exposition Park and will benefit The Wellness Community and 14 other organizations fighting female reproductive cancers. For more information or to register, call 379-4777. The Wellness Community Valley/Ventura is the local chapter of the international, nonprofit organization dedicated to providing free support, education and hope to men and women affected by cancer. – Daily News Youth Council seeks members SIMI VALLEY – The city’s Youth Council is seeking new members between the ages of 13 and 18 to serve in the group that advises the City Council on issues relating to the city’s youth. The deadline for applications is April 28, and the one-year term of office on the council begins July 1. The Youth Council is made up of 24 high school and middle school students who conduct special projects, advise city officials and host an annual youth summit designed to encourage volunteerism and community service. Applications are available at City Hall, 2929 Tapo Canyon Road, and information is available at 522-4473. – Daily News160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

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McIntyre pleased by Dundee response to ‘soft’ penalty call

first_imgDundee boss Jim McIntyre praised his side’s response to a “very soft” penalty award as they came back to earn a point against St Mirren.Simeon Jackson was adjudged to have been fouled in the box by Cammy Kerr on 21 minutes, with the Buddies striker stepping up to convert the spot kick he’d won. But Kenny Miller bagged his first goal in Dark Blue to ensure it finished honours even at Dens Park. McIntyre’s side looked the more likely to net a winner but were unable to force a breakthrough. He said: “I have watched it back. It is not a penalty for me, definitely not a pen. “But the referee gave it and the most important thing was my players’ response to it.“It was very soft so that was disappointing but the reaction of the players was great because it would be easy to feel sorry for ourselves after that because we stated the game well.“But credit to the lads, they dug in. “For what we put into the game we deserved to win. We had the stronger chances but we couldn’t find the net a couple of more times.“That was the disappointing factor. But delighted with the players in terms of what they gave us.“A far far better tempo, the way I want to play and got ourselves into some really dangerous positions.”St Mirren boss Oran Kearney bemoaned his side’s inability to stamp home their authority after edging in front.But the Northern Irishman did feel the Buddies should have had second crucial spot-kick late on when substitute Danny Mullen hit the deck.He said: “For 25 minutes after we scored we got the wrong reaction. They got the reaction I wanted from us.“Rabbit in the headlights possibly, ‘what’s happened here?’, that type of thing.“We should have had a second penalty. I have watched it again and we should. “It would have been a lovely way to end the game.“Kyle clips a free-kick in, the header comes back across and it is like the first one, Danny is between the full-back and the goal, he is on the six-yard line about to drill the ball and as he swings there is contact made, enough for Danny not to touch the ball.”last_img read more

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LP Challenges In A “Secure” Environment

first_imgParadies Lagardère is the North American division of Lagardère Travel Retail. We have 10,000 associates in more than 850 retail stores and 170 restaurants and bars in 100 airports across North America. Paradies Lagardère delivers the very best solutions—a favorite local concept or a highly desirable international brand—that exceed expectations for our airport partners and travelers. Paradies Lagardère specializes in three key airport concessions areas: dining, travel essentials, and specialty retail. Within travel essentials and specialty retail, we offer a diverse mix of categories, including fashion, luxury, electronics, convenience, sports, luggage, jewelry, and souvenirs. Paradies Lagardère also delivers high-end restaurants, quick-serve and casual restaurants, and quality bars, including local, national, and international brands that provide travelers delicious dining options.In the Beginning, There Was RetailChris RathgebWhile attending college, I began working for JCPenney in the credit and catalog department. This was the start of my retail career. While at JCPenney, a store loss prevention officer (LPO) approached the credit and catalog department team about a credit card fraud case that we might come into contact with and asked us to inform them if the person showed up to retrieve a catalog order. I ended up being the person who waited on them. I can still remember the feeling when I heard the name and turned around to find the order and realized who I was assisting. It was at that moment—and the moments after as that situation played out with the arrest of the person by law enforcement as they exited the doors of the store—that I thought of loss prevention as a position I would enjoy.I would have to wait another year before getting the opportunity to transfer schools and begin working at a different JCPenney. At my new store, I discovered they didn’t have any loss prevention presence and inquired with the store manager about the possibility of adding the position. We were nearing the holiday season, so he agreed to place me in the role. I stayed in that store for several months, and during that time I realized catching shoplifters was a lot more difficult than I understood. I ended up transferring back to my original store and met with my first loss prevention teacher, Marcia Rexford. She was the LPO who worked on the credit card fraud case and ignited my passion for loss prevention with her guidance. She was instrumental in helping me understand what to look for in a shoplifter, including behavior and actions, but it was just scratching the surface on how loss prevention impacts companies.- Sponsor – After four years with JCPenney, I accepted an entry-level LP role with Famous Barr, a division of May Company, and met the manager that had the biggest impact on my development and understanding of loss prevention, Mark Stebbe. He and John Lillard, the vice president of loss prevention, had created a team environment and a culture of learning in which I thrived. I decided during my time at Famous Barr that loss prevention was going to be the career for me.The Airports Came Calling After spending some time at Famous Barr, I decided to join a loss prevention program in the airport concessions industry. That was nearly twenty years ago, and I have never had any doubt that I made the right choice. I worked for HMSHost as they were restarting their loss prevention department. I was given the opportunity to create a program for a single airport with about thirty different restaurant concepts. Through a promotion to my first regional loss prevention manager role, I was able to expand the program to a group of airports in the company. After a year at HMSHost I was approached by the new director of loss prevention at The Paradies Shops. He was tasked with building a loss prevention program from the ground up and believed I would be a good fit to assist him. It’s not often that you are given an opportunity to create a department’s mission and purpose through ideas you have crafted in your mind on “how I would do it” from its inception. It was too good an offer to pass up. Fast forward almost nineteen years later, and I am now the senior director of loss prevention/safety and lead a team of thirteen professionals in the areas of loss prevention, safety, general insurance claims management for worker’s compensation, general liability, auto, and property, and lead business continuity for the organization. In addition, I oversee facilities management for our three support center offices and supply chain for our retail division.Some Things Never ChangeThere are several similarities between airport concessions and conventional retail and restaurants in the LP world. Airport concessions offerings have evolved over time to stay current with popular street retail and restaurants. Paradies Lagardère’s stores sell high-end electronics such as MacBooks and iPads in our iStores, premium apparel in our Brooks Brothers stores, and high-end handbags and jewelry in our Brighton Collectibles and Pandora stores. You can also find must-have travel products in our CNBC, Trip Advisor, and locally themed travel-essential stores.We have losses that include outright theft from registers, failing to record sales, taking merchandise, fraudulent refunds, moving items across multiple checks, bartering in exchange for goods, or giving away items or meals, as well as shoplifting. Customers and airport workers have stolen from us. Granted, it isn’t to the degree that you see street side, but it does happen.We experience credit card fraud, primarily in our retail division. We have had organized retail crime groups buy cheap airline tickets with the sole purpose of defrauding us. Some will simply go through security with their boarding passes, make a number of fraudulent purchases, and exit, never stepping foot on a plane. Others will make multiple stops across the country and make purchases along the way.One of our core roles is the identification and resolution of internal theft. Our ability to prosecute is based on knowing the jurisdictional guidelines of all the airports we support. In most cases, local law enforcement patrols the concourses. We build relationships with law enforcement as part of our routine. While they vary from state to state and province to province, we must know each jurisdiction’s requirements. Our ability to leverage the criminal justice system is dependent on the relationships we build with law enforcement. We established a process in the last four or five years where we will meet with local law enforcement prior to interviewing a dishonest associate. This may seem counterintuitive to contact them before you interview, but we recognized that officers are fluent in the law but not necessarily retail or restaurant theft. By taking the time in advance of our interview to explain what is happening, when it’s happening, and how we are handling it internally, it makes the after-interview process much quicker and more successful. It has been well received by our law enforcement partners in the airport.We experience operational loss such as short shipping, receiving mistakes, and so forth. Stock shortage, because of operational inefficiencies, is a part of any retail landscape including an airport environment. We are challenged with training gaps, employee turnover, and typical receiving mistakes that hamper any retail operation. We have established a corporate committee specifically designed to look at operational loss related to process gaps. This has been a significant cross-functional effort that has yielded favorable results and systemic improvements. We are constantly focused on training and use audits to help gauge compliance.Some Things Always ChangeTo help explain our specific challenges, I think it is important to provide a landscape of operating in an airport. As concessionaires, Paradies Lagardère has two customers. We have the customer who comes into our store or restaurant and pays for merchandise or services rendered. We also have a second customer, which is the airport governing body that decides which concessionaires get to do business at a specific location. Both of those customers are equally important to our success. So much so that our mission statement is “to maintain first-class standards that exceed the expectations of the customers and business partners we serve.”Street retailers often purchase the store site or negotiate a lease for a space. In the airport concessions environment, we are unable to make site purchases. Our business is dependent on a multiyear store lease based on winning a contract through a request for proposal. At the conclusion of the lease, other airport concessionaires may bid on new lease options proposed by the airport governing body. Paradies Lagardère’s retail and restaurant models are always in a state of renewal, and I need to make sure the loss prevention and safety strategies are meeting the needs of this changing environment.No two airports are the same, and no two restaurant or store layouts are the same either. We fit our stores into the space provided by the airport. Because each restaurant or store has a different layout, we have to adjust to each space. We must customize our camera design and integration, which requires an additional labor investment for each store opening.We allow a high degree of functionality on our registers for our associates. Our customers are looking for speed of service. They are typically waiting to catch a flight and can’t be held up waiting on a supervisor to approve the transaction of an associate. This allows opportunity for our associates to conduct fraudulent activity in our stores.Big Airports, Big ChallengesOur stores and restaurants are open 365 days a year. In our largest operations, we have over forty stores and restaurants. These facilities are spread out to presecurity and postsecurity and could be spread over several concourses or terminals. The concourses and terminals, at times, are not physically connected to each other. The opening and closing times of our operations vary within in each airport. This can change if we experience airline delays. We are there to provide service to the traveling public, so our hours of operation remain fluid to allow for these changes. All of these factors can make communication with our team members a challenge. Communication has to be filtered through others. It can be difficult to ensure that the original message gets to everyone in the same context. Because of this, we have to be strategic about our messages to the team.In larger airports, most of our inventory is stored at an off-site warehouse anywhere from five to twenty minutes from the airport. We can’t secure our inventory by locking or sealing the transport truck because the truck must be inspected before it can enter airport space. We have had instances of those trucks making unscheduled stops along their route to the airport to offload product to a waiting vehicle. Once the product arrives at the airport, it can go directly to a store or be placed in on-site stockrooms throughout the airport. In street retail, it is typically contained within four walls. In our environment, it can be spread between an off-site facility, on-site stockrooms, and multiple stores of an airport. This product is moved around between concourses and stores, depending on where it is needed, and we can lose visibility to where that product goes. On the street side, unpaid-for product has no reason to leave the four walls. In our environment, it will leave one lease line and be moved to another lease line with potentially a lot of space between the two.Giving Credit Where Credit is DueEvery great leader hasgreat support. The leaderswho report to me include:■■ Lilly Noyan-Paddyfoote,safety and loss controlmanager, who hasresponsibility for safety andclaims management (worker’scompensation, generalliability, auto, property) forthe organization.■■ Billy Childers, lossprevention and safetyoperations manager, whohas responsibility for lossprevention/safety centralizedprograms and services,CCTV, and retail supply chain.■■ Annette Barry, regional lossprevention/safety managerof dining, who has alignmentwith the western half of thedining division.■■ Doug Martinez, regionalloss prevention/safetymanager of retail, who hasalignment with the westernhalf of the retail division.Doug is supported bymarket managers Eric Tullisin the Texas and Southwestregions, Diane Valdezin the California region,and Rick Wittman in theMountain Plains and WesternCanada regions.■■ Bret Graddy, regional lossprevention/safety manager ofretail, who has alignment withthe eastern half of the retaildivision. Bret is supportedby market managers MarcosLozano in the Southeastand Florida regions, SteveMathieu in the Great Lakesand Eastern Canadaregions, and Martin Davisin the Northeast and OhioValley regions.The Secret to Having No SecretsOur approach to loss prevention in our retail and dining divisions is transparency. We openly discuss internal theft. We list in our internal employee communication the different ways employees can steal. We do this for multiple reasons. Our thought is that dishonest employees already have that knowledge of how to steal, but our largely honest population may not recognize what they are seeing when another associate commits an act of theft. By providing this information to our associates, we now have 10,000 people understanding how theft in the workplace occurs. When they observe it, they will know how to respond. This also shows the dishonest associate that we’ve seen it before. It’s not new. We want them to know they aren’t the first and won’t be the last. Finally, it shows a level of trust with our employees. The team recognizes we are equipping all of our associates with understanding on how to steal. But when you show trust in your employees, amazing things can happen. They feel empowered and more connected to the organization. This fits with Paradies Lagardère’s core values of TRIFIC: trust, respect, integrity, first class, innovation, and commitment.To go along with our transparency approach and emphasize the company stance on theft, Paradies Lagardère made the conscious decision to prosecute those who defraud the company. That decision is known throughout the organization. The financial dividends obtained through our shrink results reinforce this was the right decision. Since making this change five years ago, we have seen a steady decline in our shrink number. With each successive year, we have broken the record set in the previous year for lowest shrink number in company history.Another important point in how we achieve success is our relationships with our business partners. The entire team recognizes the role we play as a support function. The team develops strong relationships with their operations partners, HR partners, and LP/safety team members and works regularly in cross-functional committees to strengthen and create new and existing relationships.Tapping into the Hub of KnowledgeSince the restaurant industry is so much different than retail, I find it essential to surround myself with experienced restaurant-specific professionals that I can connect with through the Restaurant Loss Prevention and Security Association (RLPSA).Networking with like-minded professionals is the key to any loss prevention leader’s success. Attending the RLPSA’s annual conference has provided me with not only an unprecedented networking ability but also education and insight from other restaurant loss prevention programs facing similar challenges. To me, that is invaluable. Stay UpdatedGet critical information for loss prevention professionals, security and retail management delivered right to your inbox.  Sign up nowlast_img read more

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Boonville police warn of phone scam

first_imgThe Boonville Police Department is warning residents about a phone scam going around.Officers said the caller claims that your social security number has been used, and that a warrant has been issued for your arrest.The caller will then request that you push “1” for more information.“They are trying to gather your personal information to use,” the department wrote in a press release. “Social Security has no authority to issue warrants.”If you get a call like this, hang up immediately.last_img

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Civil Aviation Ministry awaits inputs from Home Ministry to finalise ‘drone policy’

first_imgOn October 19, the Mumbai Police and CISF looked frantically for a drone after airport authorities informed that around 5.55 pm the pilot of Delhi-Mumbai IndiGo flight 6E-755 saw a UAV fly 100 feet below the aircraft during landing.Pilot Ashish Ranjan informed the CISF about the blue-pink coloured aerial vehicle that he spotted 3.5 km east towards Kurla sending the security apparatus into a tizzy.The recent sightings of drones at sensitive airport of Delhi and Mumbai have caused alarm bells ringing more than often. But what is more alarming is the confusion that persists after spotting of such a UAV. With multiple agencies working on ground, who is responsible for spotting and acting against such a drone, with multiple ground, air and even intelligence agencies looking at aspects to track such a drone, which is considered a potential terror threat.A source from the CISF said, “Our troops are trained for anti-hijacking task for being deployed at the airport. We can deal with people, How do we deal with something which is air-borne? Further, multiple agencies work in tandem, does police have wherewithal to take a call of shooting the drone in sight, only Air Force has the capacity. But further adding with close to 100 sightings a year, no drone has been ever seized or shot down.”DRONE POLICY DRAFT NEARING COMPLETION This confusion may finally be laid to rest soon. The answer may lie in the Government’s  “Drone policy” which has been a work in progress for quite some time. Top level sources indicate that the government of India is almost ready with a final draft.advertisementThere have been series of meetings in North block with active participation of the Civil Aviation Ministry, top Ministry of Home Affairs (MHA) officials, CISF and even the Air Force. A final input from the Home Ministry for deciding the regulations on commercial use of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), including drones is awaited. Aviation regulator DGCA banned the use of UAVs for commercial purposes in October 2014 amid concerns over security.Also read: Mumbai on alert after IndiGo pilot spots suspicious drone In April 2016, the watchdog came out with draft norms for public consultations but there is yet to be a final decision on the issue. Recently, officials from the Civil Aviation Ministry held discussions with their counterparts in the Home Ministry about the proposed regulations for UAVs, including drones and others. “We had a meeting with the Home Ministry officials. We have requested for inputs on our proposed policy on drones and expedite the matter. As soon as we get their inputs, we will be putting out the policy on drones,” another officer dealing with an issue told India Today.PERMIT TO BE MADE MANDATORY The Directorate General of Civil Aviation (DGCA) in its draft regulations had proposed that drone users would have to secure a permit and a unique identification number for their operations. Many such drones are used for film shooting, wedding photography, adventure sport and so on. While discussing the issue a senior officer said, “While a UAV can be sold across various sites, it is dangerous that there is no way to monitor either their use or their sale. It can be potentially dangerous.” He further added that if a pizza can be delivered by a drone, so can be a bomb.Also read: Mumbai next on terror hit list? Police suspect drones may be used for attackIn the wake of technological advancements in UAVs over the years and their increased use, it has become necessary to develop guidance material to regulate their activities, according to officials. There have been growing instances of drones and other UAVs coming into the flight paths of aircraft, especially near busy airports, leading some of these countries to formulate rules to regulate these operations.In October 2014, the government had banned the use of UAVs by any non-government agency, organisation or an individual.Also read: Mumbai: Police issue fresh circular for possibility of drone attackslast_img read more

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