GMP crews restore power to 17,000 customers

first_imgGreen Mountain Power Corp,Green Mountain Power crews worked through the night to restore power to more than 17,000 customers who lost power when thunderstorms and high winds crossed Vermont Tuesday evening. Crews throughout Vermont responded quickly as reports of outages came in. ‘Our team responded quickly and efficiently to outages across the new GMP service territory,’said Dorothy Schnure, GMP corporate spokesperson. The storm hit with a double punch, taking out customers in northern Vermont areas for a second time just as the initial restoration was nearly complete. GMP staff tracked storm cells moving across the state to assess where to move crews to restore power to the areas hardest hit as quickly as possible. The ‘new’Green Mountain Power’s combined resources enable more efficient planning and response. As of early Tuesday morning, 361 customers remained without power. Restoration is anticipated to be complete by noon. The ‘new’Green Mountain Power was created on June 27 with the merger of Green Mountain Power and Central Vermont Public Service.  The combined company experienced its first storm-response test days later on July 4 when high winds ripped through north and eastern Vermont resulting in 13,000 customers losing electric services. Power was restored to all customers by the next day.  GMP field operations leaders estimated that the response time was 30 percent faster because the combined crews were able to move more rapidly to storm affected areas affected by the storm.  If customers experience an outage they can report it on the company’s website at www.greenmountainpower.com(link is external) or by calling-1-888-835-4672.  A report on current outages is always available at www.greenmountainpower.com(link is external) or www.vtoutages.com(link is external).Customer SafetyStorms and power outages can present serious risks to customers, including risks related to flooding, downed wires, generator use, and voltage problems. Green Mountain Power reminds people never to attempt to remove tree or limbs from a utility line and to stay away from downed lines. Source: GMP 7.18.2012last_img read more

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Community Sailing Center announces Mark Naud as new executive director

first_imgAbout The Community Sailing CenterThe Community Sailing Center is a community based 501(c) (3) organization with a mission to inspire the celebration and stewardship of Lake Champlain for all people through access, education and recreation. For more information, please visit www.communitysailingcenter.org(link is external) Certified as US Sailing Sanctioned Community Sailing Center, one of ten centers in the nation awarded for the highest level of safety, education and sailing curriculum. Source: Sailing Center. 6.24.2013 The Lake Champlain Community Sailing Center Board of Directors has announced the appointment of Mark Naud as executive director, effective immediately.The Board had appointed Naud as Interim Executive Director during the search and transition, and he assumed leadership of the organization on 1/1/13. Naud has been involved with the CSC for over 15 years, and most recently concluded a three-year term as President of the Board of Directors in 2011. Naud brings decades of environmental advocacy, non-profit leadership, water and land use legal expertise, and a lifetime of freshwater boating and sailing experience.The Community Sailing Center has achieved significant growth and success over the last several years, and has become a vital community resource on Burlington’s waterfront. The CSC will celebrate its 20th anniversary of operations in 2014. The organization provided on-water educational and recreational opportunities for over 5,700 people in 2012, and launched its 2013 season on May 25th that will provide access to Lake Champlain for over 6,000 people this year. Naud commented, ‘I’m thrilled to have the opportunity to work closely with our talented staff and remarkable Board as we plan for a world class facility on Burlington’s world class waterfront.Lake Access. Life Lessons. For All.The Sailing Center provides lake access as custodians of Public Trust lands for the community – giving them a connection to the biggest thing they’ll ever own. We share life lessons by connecting the community to the lake, giving them skills, competence and confidence in human powered craft and a perspective looking back on the Vermont landscape that hopefully changes their perceptions and behaviors about stewarding this amazing place we call home. We provide access, education and recreational opportunities for all members of our community, regardless of financial or physical abilities.’Robert Bloch, President of the Board of Directors, commented, ‘The Sailing Center looks forward to continuing to foster opportunities that promote education, access, and recreation on Lake Champlain. The Board is delighted that Mark Naud, with his decades of experience, will lead us through the next exciting period of our organizational development as we work with the City of Burlington and the community to secure a permanent home on the waterfront.’last_img read more

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Vermont migrant worker Danilo Lopez may avoid deportation

by Alicia Freese July 3, 2013 vtdigger.org Danilo Lopez, an undocumented farm worker living in Vermont who was slated for deportation Friday, may be granted a temporary reprieve.Instead of leaving the country, Lopez is filing an application for a ‘stay of removal,’which, if granted, could delay his deportation for up to a year.Danilo Lopez (center) speaks before Gov. Peter Shumlin signs S.38. Natalia Fajardo translates. Photo by Alicia Freese/VTDiggerNatalia Fajardo, an activist with Migrant Justice, which has been advocating on behalf of Lopez, said a U.S. Immigration and Custom Enforcement (ICE) official ‘hinted’that Lopez would be a ‘strong candidate’for a ‘stay of removal.’If it’s granted, and if the U.S. Congress passes an immigration reform bill that includes a path to citizenship for undocumented immigrants, Fajardo said it’s possible the ‘stay of removal’will allow Lopez to apply for a work permit.Lopez, a prominent immigrant rights advocate who was part of the successful lobbying effort this spring that won migrant workers the right to drive in Vermont, was turned over to the U.S. Border Patrol in 2011 after state police pulled over a car he was riding in for a speeding violation.Since then, the Vermont State Police has done away with the policy of referring people without proper documentation to the U.S. Border Patrol, although the practice still takes place among some local police departments, according to Fajardo.Vermont’s congressional delegation, Gov. Peter Shumlin, and Burlington Mayor Miro Weinberger all wrote letters urging ICE to grant Lopez prosecutorial discretion. Supporters delivered a petition to ICE offices in Burlington, Mass., asking for the same.The high-profile nature of Lopez’s situation has helped his case, Fajardo says. An ICE attorney told Migrant Justice members, ‘you’ve got a lot of ammo on your side.’ read more

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Saint Michael’s professors, with profs from Caltech and NYU, win $2 million NSF grant

first_imgSaint Michael’s College,Saint Michael’s College Professors, Joanna Ellis-Monaghan (mathematics) of Grand Isle and Greta Pangborn (computer science) of Winooski, are part of the team of 10 experts working on a project to develop self-replicating nanoscale origami. The project team learned August 1, 2013, that it has been awarded $2 million from the National Science Foundation to pursue their work.The investigators are focusing on ‘the application of origami folding to structural DNA nanotechnology, with the goal of identifying and selecting the useful configurations, copying them to produce more, and evolving the configurations over successive generations to optimize desirable features,’  according to the press release issued by CalTech.‘Given current trends in the field, being able to build materials in 3D is a very important next step,’Si-ping Han, a CalTech postdoctoral scholar wrote in the press release.Important, wide-ranging potential applications for the researchExpectations for this complex collaborative research effort range from environmental cleanup to human therapies.The role of the Saint Michael’s professors:Dr Ellis-Monaghan, left, and Dr PangbornDr. Ellis-Monaghan, a mathematician working in applied graph theory, and Dr. Pangborn, a computer scientist working in operation research, will use tools from graph theory and origami mathematics to formulate provably optimal strategies and automated algorithms for designing self-assembling DNA nanostructures and their origami folds.  They will be working closely with each of the labs to develop accurate general mathematical problem formulation for the various processes and also to meet to design challenges for specific structures targeted by the labs.Ellis-Monaghan and Pangborn are most excited because this application will have a notable impact on the direction of mathematical investigations, with the mathematics not only informing the original DNA design problems but also eventually diverging from the original stimulus to problems of independent mathematical interest. ‘Nanotechnology and biomolecular computing, especially when discrete structures and interconnections are involved, are necessarily and naturally rich sources of new problems, problems that do not necessarily follow directly from current mainstream work in graph theory and origami mathematics and hence will take the fields in new directions,’Ellis-Monaghan said. And since Saint Michael’s College is a liberal arts college in northern Vermont, they are also very pleased that this funding provides opportunities for undergraduate students to participate in cutting edge research with such important applications.The interdisciplinary team consists of William A. Goddard, III and Si-ping Han of Caltech, Nadrian C. Seeman, James W. Canary and Paul M. Chaikin of NYU, John Rossi and Lisa Scherer of City of Hope, Joanna Ellis-Monaghan and Greta Pangborn of Saint Michael’s College in Vermont, and Julian Voss-Andreae, a professional sculptor based in Portland, Oregon. Goddard is the project PI and grant is a part of NSF’s Origami Design for Integration of Self-assembling Systems for Engineering Innovation (ODISSEI) program.last_img read more

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Vermont independent insurance agents have more than $120 million impact on Vermont economy

first_imgThe results from a study commissioned by the Vermont Insurance Agents Association (VIAA) show that Vermont’s economy is positively impacted by the state’s independent insurance agencies.‘These phenomenal survey results show the significant economic contributions that Vermont’s independent agents make every day and how the communities where they live and work benefit,’ said Mary Eversole, Vermont Insurance Agents Association (VIAA) executive director. ‘Our members know their customers, provide good jobs with longevity, and, unlike direct writers, buy locally.’The study was conducted by Bertoni Marketing Consulting. Results reveal that principal member agencies of VIAA play a significant role in the Green Mountain State as employers, taxpayers, consumer spenders and charitable contributors.The study was conducted in May 2013 and 56 percent of VIAA’s membership responded. The survey represented all areas of the state, included agencies of various sizes based on the number of employees, found that the average age of a respondent  was 61 years, and the agencies surveyed were both new and old with a minimum of one year and a maximum of 192 years. All study results are for the year 2012.The financial contribution of VIAA’s member agencies in Vermont during 2012 was $120,732,228.VIAA 2012 Member Dollar ImpactTotalsRent$ 1,680,758Payroll$ 82,384,984Taxes$ 14,039,746Benefits$ 11,856,878Charity$ 1,760,526Other Expenditures$ 9,009,336Total$ 120,732,228 Payroll: Among all survey respondents, the average payroll was $876,436 for 2012. Using the payroll and FTE count from survey respondents, estimated pay per FTE was $61,271. The average benefits paid by independent agencies in Vermont were $126,137.Office Space: Approximately 45 percent of VIAA agencies own their offices followed by 40 percent that rent or lease their space. The total estimated rent paid by independent agencies in Vermont in 2012 was $1,680,758, which provides additional income to local communities throughout the state.Office Supplies and Services: VIAA members also made significant purchases of new equipment, office supplies, advertising, legal and accounting, repairs and maintenance and remodeling with average expenditures of $95,844. In 2012, more than $9 million was spent by independent insurance agencies in these segments of the economy.Philanthropy: Independent agents are very involved in their local communities as volunteers along with religious, civic and cultural activities. In 2012 independent agencies contributed more than $1.7 million to charities, with an average of $18,729 per agency. The average charitable contribution by VIAA’s largest agencies (more than 11 employees) was nearly $50,000.Established Businesses: The survey found that the majority of agencies are mature, well-established businesses in their communities and 19 percent of the agencies are more than 100 years old. Twenty-one percent of the agencies are between 51-75 years old and 32 percent of the agencies are between 31-40 years old.Protecting Vermont Businesses and Families: In addition to their economic impact, independent insurance agencies also write and service a significant segment of personal and commercial lines insurance written in Vermont. According to the most recent IIABA/A.M. Best Study, VIAA members also hold more than 51 percent share of the personal lines market in comparison to direct writers that hold a 36.5 percent market share. Independent agents dominate the commercial lines segment at 79 percent market share versus nineteen and one-half percent by direct writers.Vermont’s independent agency system works closely with domestic insurance carriers that contribute to the vibrant insurance industry. According to the Vermont Domestic Property and Casualty Companies Association (Union Mutual, Vermont Mutual, Granite Mutual, Vermont Accident, Northern Security, New England Guaranty, Green Mountain, Co-operative Insurance Companies) they employ 360 people, with an average salary of $89,623 and total compensation was over $32 million in 2012. Unlike direct writers their premiums represent business done in the state and the money stays in the state. These companies also contribute significantly to Vermont’s tax base with local property taxes of $328,766 and premium taxes of more than $2.6 million paid in 2012.View complete survey results here: VIAA Survey Results.Montpelier, Sept. 18, 2013 ‘ Vermont Insurance Agents AssociationVermont Insurance Agents Association is a statewide trade association representing nearly 100 independent insurance agencies in Vermont, with 900 employees. VIAA member independent insurance agents represent more than one insurance company, and as a result, can offer clients a wider choice of auto, home, business, life and employee benefits. Founded in 1906, VIAA’s mission is to be an advocate for independent insurance agents and to satisfy the professional needs of its members.last_img read more

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Vermont Law Leads Again at LegalTech

first_imgVermont Law School,Students and faculty from the Center for Legal Innovation at Vermont Law School will attend LegalTech 2014 in New York City, bringing with them ideas and expertise that are sought after by industry leaders like Google, LexisNexis, and Capital Novus. This is the fourth year Vermont Law has attended the conference, which has resulted in jobs for students and research support for faculty.Considered the largest and most important legal technology event of the year, LegalTech annually draws tens of thousands of attorneys and legal staff seeking the latest information in an estimated $20-30 billion industry to improve the way they practice law in an ever-changing technological world.Among the Vermont Law faculty attending LegalTech is Professor Oliver Goodenough, director of the Center for Legal Innovation (CLI) and recipient of a Google grant on how technology is changing the study and practice of law.‘The LegalTech show is an important showcase for the technology companies that are revolutionizing large portions of legal practice,’ Goodenough said. ‘For a law school to have a presence there is more than just an opportunity for its students; it makes a statement about the school’s commitment to leadership in the new reality of the law.’In addition, Jeanne Eicks, managing director of CLI, will attend and be interviewed by LexisNexis on Tuesday, Feb. 4, regarding her legal game ‘Evidence Challenge,’ which was released at the American Association of Law Schools by LexisNexis earlier this month.‘The exchange of information at LegalTech is invaluable to my students as we continually explore eDiscovery, virtual law practice, automated legal systems and other emerging trends,’ Eicks said. ‘It is also a great networking experience for them to establish connections with global innovators.’In addition to ‘Evidence Challenge,’ Eicks wrote a chapter for ‘Educating the Digital Lawyer,’ which will be distributed Thursday, Feb. 6, at the ‘Women in eDiscovery’ panel. Published by LexisNexis in 2012, the eBook was co-edited by Professor Goodenough, who is widely regarded as an academic leader in legal innovation and a pioneer of both the digital law revolution and applications of cognitive science to law.Among the Center for Legal Innovation students attending LegalTech are Sarah Truckle ‘14 and Samantha Mashler ‘14, both Google grant fellows, and alumna Amanda Lee ‘13, who was hired as a technology solutions analyst with Capital Novus, a global firm that provides knowledge management and litigation support consulting services.‘Vermont Law School’s legal technology courses and professors were integral to my finding a job prior to graduation,’ Lee said. ‘As part of the digital drafting course, I was able to attend LegalTech [in 2013] and talk with many of the attorneys and companies there. This gave me better insight into the numerous ways that technologically-savvy attorneys can thrive in our current economy and help shape the law to come.’Dan Fineberg is a former Center for Legal Innovation student who began his career as a result of attending LegalTech. He is currently employed at Exari, a Boston-based firm focusing on legal document automation, after receiving his Vermont Law degree.‘As part of my job, I advise corporate counsel on how best to automate large suites of different contracts, organize and streamline their contracting process, and assist in the automation of documents,’ Fineberg said. ‘In addition, I help to devise new functionality for the product, especially in the realm of contract lifecycle management. I also teach user training courses in both Exari contract management and Exari Power Author, and collect business requirements from clients.’Fineberg added that ‘taking eLawyering [at Vermont Law School] has been a huge help in developing the necessary skills to succeed in today’s legal market.’For more information about the Center for Legal Innovation at Vermont Law School, call 802-231-1005, email [email protected](link sends e-mail) or visit http://bit.ly/1eafhaK(link is external).SOUTH ROYALTON, Vt., Jan. 30, 2014’‘VLSlast_img read more

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Vermont Creamery cheeses get Good Food Awards seal

first_imgRecognizing excellent food made by companies with a strong social commitment, The Good Food Awards seal will soon adorn three of Vermont Creamery’s aged cheeses—Bonne Bouche, Coupole and Cremont. The Good Food Awards, announced in San Francisco, CA, represent food that is “tasty, authentic and responsibly produced” and producers that are “enhancing our agricultural landscape and building strong communities.” Vermont Creamery was among only 17 American cheesemakers to win an award.“The Good Food Award wins are particularly meaningful to us,” said Allison Hooper, Vermont Creamery co-founder and co-owner. “They get to the very DNA of what we are all about—making great cheese in a sustainable and socially responsible manner.”In 2013, Vermont Creamery opened Ayers Brook Goat Dairy, the country’s first model goat dairy in Randolph, Vt. Designed to demonstrate sustainability and best practices in the growing field of goat dairy farming, Ayers Brook helped to earn Vermont Creamery B Corp certification in 2013, and influenced the Good Food Awards wins. In addition to providing locally sourced milk to the Creamery’s cheesemaking operation, Ayers Brook preserves open farmland, employs sustainable farming practices, is home to the largest roof-mounted solar array in Vermont, and is working toward non-GMO certification.“Ayers Brook offers a new model for agriculture,” said Bob Reese, co-founder and co-owner of Vermont Creamery, “one in which sustainability, profitability, and excellence are closely aligned. We believe that sourcing milk locally, from a farm where the land and animals are treated well, is a defining factor that sets our cheese apart.”The three winners, Bonne Bouche, Coupole and Cremont are all part of the Creamery’s signature geotrichum-rinded aged cheese line. Reminiscent of the Loire Valley cheeses of France, these wrinkled-rind goat cheeses have earned some of the most prestigious honors in the cheese world.The only cheesemaker in the U.S. to receive three Good Food Awards this year, Vermont Creamery is joined at the awards table by fellow Vermont companies Eden Ice Cider, Shacksbury, Von Trapp Farmstead, Big Picture Farm, Blake Hill Preserves, and Green Jam Man.About Good Food AwardsIn its fifth year, Good Food Awards are given to winners in 11 categories: beer, charcuterie, cheese, chocolate, coffee, confections, pickles, preserve, spirits, oil, and honey. The Good Food Awards Seal, found on winning products, assures consumers they have found something exceptionally delicious that also supports sustainability and social good. For more information, visit www.goodfoodawards.org(link is external).About Vermont CreameryCombining the European tradition of cheesemaking with Vermont’s terroir, Vermont Creamery’s line of fresh and aged goat cheeses, cultured butter, and crème fraîche have won over 100 national and international awards. In their 30th year of business, Vermont Creamery supports a network of more than 15 family farms, promoting sustainable agriculture in the region. B Corp Certified in 2014, Vermont Creamery is the founder of Ayers Brook Goat Dairy, the country’s first demonstration goat dairy. For more information, visit www.vermontcreamery.com(link is external).Source: Vermont Creamery 1.9.2015last_img read more

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SVMC receives fourth ANCC Magnet recognition for nursing excellence

first_imgVermont Business Magazine Southwestern Vermont Medical Center (SVMC) has attained its fourth Magnet recognition from the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC), the highest honor an organization can receive for excellence in nursing. SVMC was the first hospital in Vermont to receive the designation. This fourth consecutive recognition places SVMC in an elite community of only three four-time designees in New England and one of only 31 four-time designees in the world. Obtaining Magnet recognition requires the integration of the program’s concepts: transformational leadership, structural empowerment, exemplary professional practice, innovation, and the measurement of outcomes. The concepts are evidenced in departmental organization and governance. Nurses work with the support and guidance of their supervisors and in collaboration with other departments to improve care.“Being recognized by Magnet is a tremendous honor,” said SVMC’s President and CEO Thomas A. Dee, FACHE. “We pursue this designation, because it holds us to the absolute highest standard. This fourth achievement affirms the foundation of nursing excellence we have built at SVMC and our continued commitment to provide exceptional care for our patients.”“We are so proud of the nurses and others who have worked tirelessly to conceptualize, execute, and document the processes that led to this prestigious achievement,” said Carol Conroy, chief nursing officer and vice president of operations.The program’s concepts have a proven association with the highest quality care and better hospital performance overall. Patients in Magnet facilities report higher satisfaction with nurse communication, availability of help, and receipt of discharge information. Magnet hospitals receive better outcomes in key performance indicators, including rates of falls, skin integrity, and risk of 30-day mortality. In addition, Magnet facilities have higher job satisfaction among nurses, more highly trained nurses, and lower turnover rates. Highly qualified and satisfied staffs are shown to have a positive impact on patient safety, and are more likely to prevent adverse events that can harm patients and increase hospital costs.“Magnet status is one of the most powerful indications of hospital quality,” said Chair of SVHC’s Board of Trustees David Meiselman. On behalf of the Board of Trustees, we’d like to thank our nurses and the teams who work with them to achieve this level of excellence. Ultimately, it’s patients who win.”Three SVMC programs were noted by Magnet appraisers as exemplary:·         Transitional Care Nursing, which drastically reduces hospital readmission rates;·         Safe Arms, a program that keeps infants withdrawing from opiates from being transferred to hospitals further from their families; and·         the Community Care Team, which brings leaders from the most often used services together to collaborate on care for patients with complex needs.“Magnet shares our innovations with others to improve nursing practice globally,” Conroy added. “In this way, we are able to benefit patients right here while paving the way for other hospitals to improve care for their communities.”The Magnet review is a rigorous year-long process. The documentation a hospital presents must meet a high standard in order to continue to the next level, an on-site appraisal. The appraisal is a thorough in-person review of all aspects of nursing, including the collection of feedback from leaders, staff, and community members.Hospitals must reapply for Magnet recognition every four years. SVMC adopted Magnet standards in 1998 and was first designated in 2002. At every stage, facilities undergoing the redesignation process must provide evidence that their nursing teams have sustained and surpassed their execution of Magnet standards since the previous review.“Our 16 year partnership with Magnet has been so rewarding. The program sets forth a tremendous challenge,” Conroy said. “We continue to accept it for all the benefits to patients, for nurses’ satisfaction, and for the culture of excellence it inspires at SVMC.” About SVHC:Southwestern Vermont Health Care (SVHC) is a comprehensive, preeminent health care system providing exceptional, convenient, and affordable care to the communities of Bennington and Windham Counties of Vermont, eastern Rensselaer and Washington Counties of New York, and northern Berkshire County in Massachusetts. SVHC includes Southwestern Vermont Medical Center (SVMC), a 99-bed community hospital, whose providers are members of the Dartmouth-Hitchcock Putnam Physicians. SVMC’s services include an emergency department staffed by physicians each of whom is board certified in emergency medicine; the Southwestern Vermont Regional Cancer Center, which is accredited by the American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer and managed by Dartmouth-Hitchcock; and a fully-digital imaging department. SVMC also includes 19 primary and specialty care practices and primary care offices in Bennington, Manchester, Pownal, West Dover, and Wilmington, VT. In addition to SVMC, SVHC includes the Centers for Living and Rehabilitation, a 150-bed long- and short-term care skilled nursing facility, and the SVHC Foundation. To learn more, visit svhealthcare.org(link is external).About the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s (ANCC) Magnet Recognition Program®: The Magnet Recognition Program® administered by the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC), the largest and most prominent nurses credentialing organization in the world, recognizes healthcare organizations that provide the very best in nursing care and professionalism in nursing practice. The Magnet Recognition Program® serves as the gold standard for nursing excellence and provides consumers with the ultimate benchmark for measuring quality of care. For more information about the Magnet Recognition Program® and current statistics, visit www.nursecredentialing.org/magnet(link is external).BENNINGTON, VT—December 15, 2015— Southwestern Vermont Medical Centerlast_img read more

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Social media and craft beer: 5 questions with Kat Barnes

first_imgby Tera Dacek The craft beer industry is a breeding ground for communities. Whether it is a random Wednesday night at your local brewery with a group of friends, a yoga class, new release or a festival, breweries have the habit of bringing people together. So, it’s really no surprise that the digital landscape mimics what happens at the brewery. Social media keeps beer lovers in the know with their favorite beers, and apps like Untappd(link is external) make it quite easy beer for geeks to connect and rate their beers. Kathleen Barnes (Kat) rules the roost, as the marketing manager for four brands under the Alchemy and Science (Burlington, Vermont) umbrella including, Traveler Beer Co(link is external)., Coney Island Brewing Co.(link is external), Concrete Beach Brewery(link is external) and Angel City Brewery(link is external).It’s no shocker that most craft beer brands use social media to its fullest to reach the growing audience of beer enthusiasts, but we wanted to know: Where do the folks like Kat get social?Picture yourself in an airport bar in LAX. You are caught up on emails (high five!), and you’re searching the World Wide Web. Top five places you go:First I’d probably do a quick Instagram/Facebook check, then head on to one of the following, depending on the day/mood:Refinery29(link is external)Flipboard(link is external)Well & Good(link is external)The Kitchn/Apartment Therapy(link is external)Twitter: maintaining, disappearing or on the rise?I’d say maintaining. I still go through Twitter daily to get my dose of news, and from a brand standpoint, we see quite a bit of value in Twitter for sharing information. I definitely see less of my peers on Twitter, but that has always been the case. That being said, I think it provides plenty of value and won’t be going away anytime soon.How fast is the digital media landscape of beer changing, and do you have any staples that you hit for industry updates?Well, for one thing, there is far more brewery competition than there was even just a few years ago. It’s clear that a lot of craft brands are investing in digital marketing talent, which wasn’t always the case. I see it every day from the various breweries I follow online and the cool things they are doing. With any brand, as new technologies come out, it’s always fun to play around and see how they apply to your brand. For example, we just started running Instagram ads not long ago. Last year at this time, we couldn’t play in that space — it wasn’t open to the little guys. It’s great because it’s another tool to add to our mix. However, on the flip side, everyone else has access to that now, so you have to be more creative than ever to really stand out.I follow Inc(link is external), AdAge(link is external), Mashable(link is external), Business Insider(link is external), etc., for my marketing news.  I try to spend time each day going through Twitter and Flipboard to catch up on the latest trends and to see what other brands are doing.Is there such a thing as too much social media?Absolutely! I see the digital world as this parallel universe. Yeah, it’s great to stay connected to your friends and family, share information, and stay informed. But at the end of the day it’s real life, real relationships, and real experiences that are the most valuable. The cool thing about doing digital marketing for such a great group of breweries is that we use the online tools as an extension of our physical communities. But the real magic happens is at our breweries and at our events where experiences really come to life. We just try to support and enhance those experiences online.You’re at a brewery that you have never been to and you’re by yourself. Are you on your phone or chatting it up with the locals?Chatting it up, for sure. One of my biggest pet peeves is seeing people glued to their phones in a social setting.This piece is submitted by the University of Vermont Continuing and Distance Education. Tera Dacek is a consultant and freelance writer. She most recently worked as Marketing Manager for Alchemy and Science. When she unplugs, she can be found at her local mountain or one of the many wonderful breweries in her home state of Vermont.last_img read more

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Partnership set to improve care for children with special health care needs

first_imgUniversity of Vermont,Vermont Business Magazine ACT.md, a national provider of team-based care coordination technology and services, has announced a partnership with the Vermont Child Health Improvement Program (VCHIP), a population-based maternal and child health services research and quality improvement program of the University of Vermont (UVM). VCHIP researchers in the UVM College of Medicine are using ACT.md’s Care Coordination Record to engage community healthcare providers and multidisciplinary care teams in a federally-funded effort to improve population health management for families with children and youth with special health care needs.ACT.md’s Care Coordination Record is a cloud-based and HIPAA-compliant platform that is designed to power team-based care. VCHIP will use the ACT.md Care Coordination Record and Secure Messaging to engage medical home teams, social workers, and community specialists in creating and using shared plans of care with families with children and youth with special health care needs.“Our vision is for every family with children and youth with special health care needs to have an electronic shared plan of care that is family-centered, easy-to-use, and secure,” said Valerie Harder, M.H.S., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at UVM and Principal Investigator for VCHIP. “With ACT.md’s technology, we are helping community providers and families integrate and more easily manage their systems of care.”“Like VCHIP, we believe that every medically complex patient should have a care plan that is patient-centered and easy to share,” said Ted Quinn, ACT.md Co-founder and CEO. “This is especially true for the complex pediatric population and their families who too often struggle to keep everyone who is caring for their child on the same page. VCHIP and their community partners have a unique opportunity to knock down barriers within the health care system and transform the way care is delivered to families of children with medical complexity.”In Vermont and across the country, delivering coordinated care for children and youth with special health care needs is a growing challenge. About one in 25 children born in the United States experiences medical complexity, and the population of these children is increasing at a rate of about 5 percent annually, outpacing the growth rate of children as a whole. Nationally, these children account for roughly 30% of pediatric health costs – $100 billion annually – comprising 55% of all pediatric inpatient and 85% of all pediatric 30-day readmission costs.This VCHIP project is funded by the Community Health Peer Learning Program, a national peer learning collaborative managed by AcademyHealth through a $2.2 million award from the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC).About ACT.mdACT.md is a digital health company that simplifies complex care for everyone involved. ACT.md’s Care Coordination Record™ connects all care team members and drives coordinated action through one cloud-based interoperable platform. ACT.md’s Care Traffic Control™ extends the impact of care teams while supporting patients and preventing system failures. Learn more at http://www.act.md/(link is external).Source: ACT.md BOSTON, MASS., AND BURLINGTON, VT. (PRWEB) APRIL 29, 2016last_img read more

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