Prince Michael Updated on Work of MGI

first_imgRelatedPrince Michael Lauds Jamaicans Prince Michael Updated on Work of MGI Office of the Prime MinisterApril 17, 2013 Advertisements FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail His Royal Highness, Prince Michael of Kent, was given an insight into the work of the Mona Geoinformatics Institute (MGI) in Jamaica’s national road safety programme, when he visited the University of the West Indies (UWI) based institution, on April 16.The visit formed part of the itinerary for the Prince’s five-day working visit to the island, from April 15 to 19, as special guest of the National Road Safety Council (NRSC).[RELATED: Prince Michael Lauds Jamaicans]During a brief roundtable discussion and presentation, MGI Director, Dr. Parris Lyew-Ayee, informed the Prince that the institute, which conducts wide ranging research, was tasked to undertake a road safety analysis for Jamaica.He said the MGI has been able to generate data with accompanying imagery on some 74,000 motor vehicle accidents which have occurred since January 1, 2000. “We really want to provide evidence-based intervention. We are going to use data, (and) we are going to use facts, to help drive and inform policies. We have researchers (at the UWI) doing many different things that can be brought to bear on addressing very specific issues related to the development of national objectives and policies. Here at the institute, we already work very closely with the Jamaica Automobile Association (JAA) and National Works Agency,” he said.Dr. Lyew-Ayee said the data generated will facilitate the identification of challenges arising along roadways prone to frequent accidents; better inform the police of the points where they can enhance their vigilance, thereby reducing poor road usage by motorists and pedestrians and, ultimately accidents and fatalities; and enhance public awareness and education.“Here, at the University, we hope to set up a regional road safety centre that will look at data analysis, policy development, and bring our research capacity to bear (on reducing road accidents and fatalities),” he added.Director of Road Safety at the Fédération Internationale de l’Automobile (FIA) Foundation, Adrian Walsh, who is part of the Prince’s party, commended the work of the MGI.“I think this is really fantastic. This compares with any country in the world in terms of the quality of the data,” Mr. Walsh said.The Prince and members of his party were then taken on a tour of the MGI’s facilities, before departing the UWI.The Prince is the Royal Patron for the Commission for Global Road Safety and Patron of the non-profit organisation, Fédération Internationale de l’Automobile (FIA). Both organizations have been leading advocates in the fight to reduce road traffic injuries and deaths.He is also Patron for the Institute of the Motor Industry, as well as founder and patron of the Prince Michael Road Safety Award Scheme. Additionally, he is President of the Institute of Road Safety Officers and is an Honorary Fellow at the Institute of Highways and Transportation.The Prince, who arrived in the island on April 15, is on a five-day visit as the special guest of the National Road Safety Council (NRSC), which is celebrating its 20th anniversary.Prince Michael will depart the island on Friday, April 19.By Douglas McIntosh, JIS Reportercenter_img RelatedPublic Servants Agree to Wage Restraint RelatedGround Broken for New Barracks at Up Park Camplast_img read more

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Omaha Paramedics Investigated for Allowing Child to Use Radio during Emergency Transport

first_imgOMAHA, Neb. – The Omaha fire department is investigating whether paramedics acted inappropriately when they let an 11-year-old boy talk on an emergency radio.Brett Roth says his grandson, Joey Roth, was riding in the ambulance carrying his grandmother to a hospital Tuesday when he was allowed to relay information over the radio. The message was “On route to Immanuel. Code 2. Ambulance 21 at Immanuel.”Brett Roth says the boy was upset and the ambulance crew was trying to calm him. He doesn’t think paramedics did anything wrong.Last month, an air traffic controller at New York’s Kennedy Airport was suspended after bringing his son to work and allowing the youngster read a few routine messages to pilots. His supervisor was also suspended.___Information from: KETV-TV, http://www.ketv.comlast_img read more

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See Phillipa Soo & the Original Cast of Hamilton Reunite to Perform ‘Helpless’

first_imgHamilton’s eagerly anticipated film premiere is coming up on July 3, and the original Broadway cast is getting hyped up. As Broadway.com fans know, former vlogger Leslie Odom Jr. is looking back at his 2016 vlog with fresh insight. On June 26, Phillipa Soo, Lin-Manuel Miranda and original Broadway cast members performed “Helpless” on The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon with the help of The Roots and some household objects. Look for Tony winners Odom Jr., Daveed Diggs, Renée Elise Goldsberry and more! Check it out below. Phillipa Soo View Comments Renée Elise Goldsberry Star Files Related Shows Daveed Diggscenter_img from $149.00 Lin-Manuel Miranda Leslie Odom Jr. Hamilton View All (5)last_img read more

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Men who gamble are more likely to act violently towards others

first_imgShare Men who gamble are more likely to act violently towards others, with the most addicted gamblers the most prone to serious violence, new research has shown.A study published in the journal Addiction found that gambling in any capacity – pathological, problem, or so-called casual gambling – related to significantly increased risk of violence, including domestic abuse.Researchers surveyed 3,025 men about whether they had ever engaged in violent behaviour, including if they had ever been in a physical fight, assaulted or deliberately hit anyone, if they had used a weapon, and whether the violence was perpetrated when they were drunk or on drugs. The survey also asked if they had ever hit a child, suffered from mental illness, whether they took regular medication, or exhibited impulsive behaviour. LinkedIn Pinterest The men surveyed – who came from a range of socio-economic backgrounds across the UK and varied in age – were also asked about whether they gambled. Eighty per cent of participants admitted to taking part in some sort of gambling activity during their lifetime.The researchers found a statistically significant link between gambling and violent behaviour, which became starker the more severe the gambling habit. Just over half of pathological gamblers, 45 per cent of problem gamblers, and 28 per cent of ‘casual gamblers’ reported some form of physical fight in the past five years.In contrast, among the non-gamblers, only 19 per cent reported being involved in violence.Additionally, gambling was associated with an increased likelihood of weapons being used in acts of violence, with more than a quarter in the pathological category, 18 per cent of problem gamblers, and seven per cent of non-problem gamblers reporting weapon usage. Just over 15 per cent of non-problem gamblers also admitted to having had a fight while intoxicated, which rose to more than a quarter in problem gamblers and almost a third in pathological gamblers.The study also found that pathological and problem gamblers are more likely to have hit a child, with almost 10 per cent of pathological gamblers and just over 6 per cent of problem gamblers admitting to such behaviour. Those with likely pathological gambling problems also had increased odds of committing violent behaviour against a partner.The results remained statistically significant even after adjusting the data to account for related characteristics such as mental illness or impulsive behaviour. However, it was not clear whether gambling and the propensity towards violence have a common cause, or whether one increases risk of the other.Researchers said the findings could help improve prevention and treatment programmes.The study was led by psychologists from the University of Lincoln, UK, working with researchers from Queen Mary University, University College Cork, University of East London, Imperial College London, and AUT University in New Zealand.Lead author Dr Amanda Roberts, from the University of Lincoln’s School of Psychology, said: “Understanding the relationship between gambling and violence will help treatment services tailor intervention and treatment programmes for their clients.“Our study examined a nationally representative sample of males and confirmed strong links between problematic gambling and violent behaviours, and also showed links with non-problem gambling. The results reinforce the view that public health efforts to prevent problem gambling should include education around violence, and that there could be value in integrating those efforts with alcohol and drug abuse programmes.“Given the strong associations identified, there is some justification for establishing a standard battery of screens for gambling, alcohol, drug and violence issues in a range of mental health and addictions settings.”The study participants were men ranging in age from 18 to 64 years and came from a range of socio-economic backgrounds across England, Wales and Scotland.The level of their gambling problem was determined by scoring a series of 20 questions answered by participants: people with a score of zero to two were classed as non-problem gamblers, those with scores of three and four were defined as problem gamblers, and probable pathological gamblers were those who scored five or more.The paper Gambling and violence in a nationally representative sample of UK men, has been published in Addiction.center_img Share on Facebook Email Share on Twitterlast_img read more

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Bring back Green forms

first_imgThose of us of a certain age will remember ‘Green’ forms. They covered legal advice and meant that virtually anyone could get advice on anything, from any solicitor, if they could not pay for it. You filled in the client’s means on the front and you had something called a keycard which I think was pink or lilac to work out if they were entitled to free advice. At the end of case you wrote brief details of the work done and sent them off every month with a consolidated claim form, which was a buff yellow (how colourful the law was!), listing all the green forms. You had to keep a copy of them as the Legal Aid Board would just pay you the total. Sometimes they would reject one or several and not tell you which. You had to work out with the firm’s bookkeeper which had been paid and which had not. Hours of harmless fun. My point is that specialisation has been a good thing because the Legal Services Commission wants value for money but it may have gone too far. Many legal aid areas are highly technical and need lawyers who know the ropes. The clients are often vulnerable. Basic advice usually meant a few letters and meetings. However, the profession has lost the ability to give basic advice to people who need it and cannot pay for it. This is particularly clear in areas like where I practise such as small market towns with limited numbers of lawyers who offer legal aid. Specialists are few and far between. Most clients struggle to come from the streets around Aylesbury let alone are willing to get the bus to Luton or Oxford to get specialist help. The not-for-profit sector has not been able to bridge this gap. They are facing similar funding cuts to lawyers. There are less benefit, housing and debt advisers. I was at a hearing recently in the West Midlands and the person before the tribunal had some debt problems. Nothing serious to you or me, except they were very vulnerable and demands from debt collectors are frightening. It just needed a few letters and the help to complete a budget form. When I asked about debt advisors or any advisors the social worker looked blank and explained there were none. So bring back the green form. I do not even care what colour it is this time. David Pickup is a partner in Aylesbury based Pickup & Scottlast_img read more

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