Google’s Android licensing regime in the spotlight

first_img Tags HomeDevicesNews Google’s Android licensing regime in the spotlight Related AndroidGoogleMicrosoftNokia Google pulls plug on Android Things Steve works across all of Mobile World Live’s channels and played a lead role in the launch and ongoing success of our apps and devices services. He has been a journalist…More Read more Author Google has used “little-known contract restrictions” to compel device makers to install all of its apps on Android devices, with the prominence it requires, including setting them as defaults, according to a blog post from an associate professor at Harvard Business School.According to Benjamin Edelman, in order to obtain apps such as Google Search, Maps and YouTube, vendors must sign a Mobile Application Distribution Agreement (MADA), which contains the requirement to bundle the full suite of Google apps, including guidelines on where specific apps are placed.And the MADA also includes a clause which prohibits vendors from disclosing its existence, although it has been disclosed in the Oracle versus Google lawsuit – but the document was not made available online.Edelman said that while a vendor may feel that a specific product is available which is competitive with the Google alternative, others are crucial to a modern smartphone – for example the Google Play content store, or YouTube app. The need for these apps means that a vendor is locked into using the full Google portfolio, even where alternatives exist.While the post notes that other apps can be installed alongside, this creates duplication for users, and “in the key categories of search and location”, Google’s apps must be set as default.The news comes shortly after Android Police reported that in order to gain access to the Google Mobile Services portfolio, the search giant is set to force device vendors to adopt newer versions of the Android platform – there had been some criticism that vendors were still offering smartphones powered by early versions of the OS.The latest version of Android (KitKat) has been designed to work on devices with less capable hardware, removing one reason for vendors to stick with earlier incarnations.And as more and more Android functionality is evolved to include integration with Google’s cloud services, functionality is being migrated from the core open source version of Android (AOSP) to become part of Google Mobile Services.According to ABI Research, the number of devices using Android, but not Google’s products and services, is on the increase, in no small part due to the use of the platform by vendors in China.To offer a compelling device internationally without including Google services, a vendor would need to source alternative location services, search tools and app store, among others.But Amazon, for example, has already done this, and it is reported that Nokia is considering following a similar path, using Microsoft-powered alternatives – and in many ways, Microsoft is one of the few companies able to compete with Google on such a broad level.center_img Steve Costello AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInLinkedInShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to MoreAddThisMore 18 FEB 2014 Previous ArticleAirtel confirms Loop deal; plans Mumbai’s largest mobile networkNext ArticleSingTel linked to AIS shareholder stake — report Devices Google taps retail with NYC store Google refreshes Nest Hublast_img read more

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Comment / Why millennials overlook a career in logistics – by a millennial

first_imgSomething that has always drawn me to my father’s line of work was watching him travel across the globe. The possibility to experience other cultures and to meet a diverse pool of people through your career is the diamond that shines through the rough, long hours.And although we get the occasional whinge and whine about the stressful nature of the job, you see a man who is truly passionate about his career, and that passion is infectious.And there are plenty of opportunities to work in the sector – which is not true of every industry.Vice president of value-added service for DHL Germany Christiane Beimel said: “Supply chain managers are retiring faster than they can be replaced”; 25 to 33% of supply chain professionals are nearing retirement age.  So it’s crucial to entice the younger generations into the industry.  The question, is how? First and foremost, companies need to educate young people about what logistics really is. To leave the banal label of logistics behind, it is integral to highlight the expansive nature of the field, with its eclectic mix of career paths on offer, ranging from supply chain management to warehouse design, from sales to sailings.  Secondly, as younger generations begin to define themselves as citizens of the world, it is important to highlight the importance of logistics in helping develop a cosmopolitan society. Logistics is one of the key enablers of globalisation, internationally linking the supplies and demands of the entire world.  Logistics facilitates the fusion of cultures through the movement of different products from different nations.  And logistics is about co-operation and collaboration, helping to keep the world in order, rather than solely about financial competition. Young people will be drawn into the industry, wanting to brand themselves as enablers of multiculturalism.  And then there is climate change, a key issue for the young today, and logistics can play a big part.The environment particularly resonates with millennials. With the transport sector accounting for 25% of the total commercial energy consumed worldwide, supply chain managers are integral for instigating fuel-efficient shipping.   Finally, there is new hope for logistics in the post-Covid world, as nations rely on freight forwarders to transport essential products, such as PPE and other medical supplies. The consumer typically overlooks how we get our online orders, but residing in these unprecedented times has caused a shift. Young people are now thinking about how their goods arrive, and are becoming more aware of  it.But companies, you have a job to do. To ensure a steady flow of young applicants into the field, it’s crucial that you educate millennials about what it means to work in logistics, and to ensure that the preconception of the heavy haulier or underpaid warehouse worker can at long last become a remnant of the past. By James Liddell 10/08/2020 James Liddellcenter_img To most millennials, the semantics of ‘logistics’ are riddled with outdated stereotypes of a heavy haulier, or warehouse shelf stackers.The more desirable elements of the industry – of which there are many – are not projected to young people, causing a lack of exposure and knowledge about logistics. Luckily, my own perceptions of logistics are clearer than most of my generation. Although I have not directly worked in the field, I have been exposed to logistics my entire life, as my father works in the freight forwarding industry. This places me in a unique position to offer the perspective of a young person who is external to the trade, while  still understanding what logistics really is.  Having a freight forwarder in the family has revealed far more than the technical aspects of logistics. It has illustrated a lifestyle. Yes, the hours can be gruelling and long, with the workload seemingly relentless at times. And although there sometimes appears to be an imbalance between the amount of time spent in the office and at home, the industry does offer good prospects.last_img read more

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Governor Scott presses Legislature on $26 million

first_imgThis story was updated on Friday May 12 and Saturday May 13.by Timothy McQuiston Vermont Business Magazine The Legislature is still in session in large part due, if not wholly due, to Governor Phil Scott’s big push to form one health insurance risk pool for all of the state’s teachers, which he says could save the property taxpayers $26 million a year. The House could reconvene on Tuesday (May 16) and the Senate will come back on Wednesday or Thursday to try and sort out what could turn into the governor vetoing the budget. In any case, the Legislature will miss its adjournment deadline, which had been anticipated for May 6.Scott has been beating the drum hard on the teacher health plan since the end of April and has the blunt instrument of using his veto power on the state budget if such an amendment is not included.The Democratic leadership, at first caught off-guard by the plan and its general public favorability, came up with its own plan by Thursday that would retain local collective bargaining for teachers and save about $13 million by using generally the same formula, but applying the savings only to in-state residential property owners.Both plans would reduce property taxes by 3 cents per $100 of property value.RELATED STORY: Leonine: Adjournment delayed againUsing Treasurer Beth Pearce’s formula that one-cent on the property tax would raise $8 million, 3 cents would be worth $24 million. Thus the $26 million would lower the property tax rate by about that amount. The savings to someone with a home worth $250,000 would be about $75 a year under both the governor’s and the Democrats’ proposals.Currently, the teachers’ union negotiates health insurance as part of the district-by-district collective bargaining process. The union is vehemently against Scott’s profound change in such a large piece of its compensation package.The Democratic Party initially dismissed the notion out of hand, and then aggressively, but in the last couple of weeks the legislative leaders have had to respond and sought some sort of compromise.The options appear to be, keep the negotiations at the local level and either let the local districts decide on what to do with the $26 million, or turn negotiations over to the state, which would then apply the savings to the statewide property tax. Legislative leaders last week suggested the districts could retain the local control, but then turn over the savings to the state.But the governor is dubious that there indeed would be any savings at the end of the day under that scenario.House Speaker Mitzi Johnson and Senate President Pro Tem Tim Ashe’s proposal later in the week would more directly save residential taxpayers that $13 million.Along with the impact on the collective bargaining process and the loss of local control, opponents of the governor’s plan, principally the National Education Association union, also question the metrics used in determining the amount of savings.Those savings include assumptions about behavior and how much individuals will be willing to pay out of pocket for medical services, even with the lower premiums. The NEA says that the compensation range for teachers and aides is very broad, so some may put off going to the doctor because they can’t meet the deductible.Speaker Johnson won a victory last week when such an amendment was introduced, but only just. She had to cast the tie-breaking vote in the heavily Democratic House. Such a vote suggests that Scott could have a veto sustained if came to that.This appears to be the biggest legislative battle since the twin vetoes that the Legislature overturned when Governor Jim Douglas vetoed the marriage equality bill (“gay marriage”) and then the budget in 2009. That was the first time in Vermont history that a governor had vetoed the budget. The Legislature came back in June to override the veto. Douglas lost much political leverage in the gay marriage veto and override, which likely cost him during the subsequent budget debate and then second veto override.But that involved seasoned leaders on both sides (Speaker Shap Smith and Senate President Pro Tem Peter Shumlin on one side with Douglas into his fourth and last term as governor on the other). Douglas announced the following August that he would not run for re-election and Shumlin became the state’s next governor in 2011.The leadership in the House and Senate are new and Scott began his first term as governor just in January.Because of the Affordable Care Act (“ObamaCare”), virtually all teacher health insurance plans must be re-done to start a new plan on January 1, 2018. Scott’s plan would have all the teachers under one state plan, which would save about $75 million in premiums. The premiums are significantly lower under the proposed new plan, but the out-of-pocket costs are higher. Scott said he would take nearly $50 million of the savings and apply against the out-of-pocket costs, so that the net for teacher health costs would be the same as it is now. However, the teachers’ union would lose negotiating power going forward. It also maintains that local school districts would lose some of their local control over their own budgets.“The Governor is not willing to leave millions in taxpayer relief to chance when we have this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to make Vermont more affordable – on an immediate and ongoing basis – without cutting programs for kids or asking teachers to pay more,” said the governor’s spokesperson Rebecca Kelly earlier in the week.RELATED STORIES:As Adjournment Nears, Budget Agreement In Jeopardy Over Issue Of Teacher Health Plans(link is external)Governor Scott: With significant savings on the table, we must act nowlast_img read more

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