Supermacs welcome ruling stopping McDonalds trademarking ‘Mc’

first_img Nine til Noon Show – Listen back to Monday’s Programme The boss of Supermacs says he’s ‘delighted’ with an EU ruling which stops McDonalds from trademarking the ‘Mc’ prefix.An assessment found McDonalds can only trademark it in relation to its chicken nuggets and on some sandwiches.It’s the second time Supermacs has been successful in a legal challenge against the fast food giant, after winning a challenge to have the Big Mac trademark cancelled earlier this year.Managing Director Pat McDonagh says it’s a victory for small businesses:Audio Playerhttp://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/mcdonagh9am.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume. Previous articleLough Swilly RNLI launched after EPIRB signal activated at Mulroy BayNext articleFinn Harps U15s finish fourth at Dublin Cup News Highland Supermacs welcome ruling stopping McDonalds trademarking ‘Mc’ Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic Twitter Pinterest WhatsApp By News Highland – August 6, 2019 Facebook Twitter Google+center_img Google+ Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population grows WhatsApp Pinterest Loganair’s new Derry – Liverpool air service takes off from CODA News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th DL Debate – 24/05/21 AudioHomepage BannerNews RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Facebooklast_img read more

Continue reading

Fulop signs order giving 10% of future abatement revenue to Jersey…

first_img Jersey City Mayor Steven Fulop has signed an executive order giving 10 percent of future tax abatement revenue to the local public schools. By John Heinis/Hudson County View“For the past four years we worked on correcting the fiscal mismanagement and structural deficit that we inherited from past administrations, and were able to deliver four consecutive years of no tax increases and three consecutive credit upgrades,” said Fulop said in a statement.“With the city’s fiscal house on solid footing, we believe now is the right time set the standard that tax abated properties contribute to the board of education to relieve the burden on all of our city taxpayers.”The mayor further explained that the revenue would be shared through an unrestricted transfer of funds at the end of each calendar year, later adding that the success of Jersey City “can be seen in the growth of our school population.”Tax abatements have been a hot button issue for the Fulop administration, a consistent talking point for critics which culminated in a mock celebration, led by former Board of Education Trustee Ellen Simon, of the 70th tax abatement approved by the council.Simon and many others argued that 33 percent of the revenue from each payment in lieu of taxes (PILOT) agreement should go towards the Jersey City Public Schools District.The administration analyzed a formula from Rutgers University that estimates the number of children expected per each PILOT high rise building, while also taking into account past examples in practice, the mayor’s office explained.According to the high end of that projection, 25 percent of the units would send children to the school system, which is a very high estimate.Using a formula that determines the amount of each abated project’s impact on city services, and factoring in 25 percent of the units using the schools, the city rounded upwards to 10 percent for the revenue to be shared with the public schools.The executive order also includes revenue on tax abated commercial hotel properties, even though those buildings do not contribute to the school population or add to its operating costs.“On behalf of the Jersey City Public Schools, I thank Mayor Fulop for continuing to work in the best interest of our children,” Jersey City Superintendent of Schools Dr. Marcia Lyles said in the same statement.“We have seen tremendous growth and progress in our schools, and know this will continue that forward momentum.”Speaking to Hudson County View over the phone, Jersey City Education Association President Ron Greco said this is a step in the right direction, but 10 percent is still not enough.“I’m in agreement with Marcia Lyles that our staff and students will benefit from this economic boost and I’m glad to see that the mayor is acting in a responsible manner in helping to fund the school district,” stated Greco.“However, this is a low ball figure, he should be requiring the developer to pay the full school tax that would’ve been picked up over the life of the abatement.” Previous articleFamily of West New York man found in Hudson River seeking public’s helpNext articleJersey City Councilmen Boggiano, Yun seeking re-election as independents John Heinis Community Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Jersey CityPolitics & Policy RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Facebook Twitter By John Heinis – April 5, 2017 1:56 pm 0 CarePoint Health reaches deal for Cigna Health Insurance to join their network Community TAGSjersey city public schoolssteven fuloptax abatements SHARE Bayonne Fulop signs order giving 10% of future abatement revenue to Jersey City Public Schools Jersey City high school teacher suspended after rant calling George Floyd ‘a f***ing criminal’ FBW says Prime Cycle’s new location violates state guidelines for Hoboken waterfrontlast_img read more

Continue reading

Ginebra survives TNT, 96-93, in PBA Govs’ Cup

first_imgThe Kings moved up to a 6-3 win-lossrecord.LA Tenorio and Pringle also submitted double digit scoring with 19 and 14markers, respectively. The Kings notched the win despite theabsence of Gregory Slaughter and Negrense Joe Devance.Trailing for most part in the opening half, the Kings started strong in thethird canto behind conversions from Tenorio, Brownlee and Aguilar as they tooka 74-68 advantage. Meralco went for the kill in thefourth quarter as consecutive baskets from Durham allowed them to take an 84-67that later went up to its largest at 92-71 on a triple by Nico Salva. The Bolts had the upper-hand since theopening quarter behind Allen Durham and Raymond Almazan as they went on tobuild a 45-29 halftime edge but the Dyip never gave up as it trimmed thedeficit to single digit several times in the second half. The Kings went on to build its largestlead at 82-69 edge after a triple by Tenorio but the KaTropa slowly clawed itsway back until forcing a deadlock at 92-all on a triple by Roger Pogoy. With the defeat, the KaTropa slumpedto second spot in the standings at 7-2to a tie with the Meralco Bolts, whichrolled to its fourth consecutive win in the first game as it defeated ColumbianDyip, 92-74. Barangay Ginebra San Miguel Kings’ Japeth Aguilar scores a one hander over the defense of TNT KaTropa’s Bobby Ray Parks Jr. PBA PHOTO Durham had double-double 34 points and18 rebounds, while Almazan added 18 markers for the Bolts. Jaymar Perez tallied21 points as the Dyip slumped to its second straight defeat to slid down to 4-6slate./PN MANILA – Barangay Ginebra San MiguelKings survived an endgame rally by TNT KaTropa for a 96-93 victory in the 2019PBA Governors’ Cup last night at the Smart Araneta Coliseum.After seeing its 14-point edge turned to a 92-all count, Stanley Pringle surgedthe Kings ahead with a layup before Justin Brownlee canned in two free throwsto escape with the win.Japeth Aguilar finished with double-double 29 points and 10 rebounds, whileBrownlee posted 24 points, 16 rebounds and six assists.last_img read more

Continue reading

Mind Your Mental Health This Winter

first_imgIf you always feel down as the winter season rolls on, you may be suffering from Seasonal Affective Disorder or SAD — a type of depression that comes and goes with the seasons. SAD is a type of depression some people deal with during winter which can cause many of us feel like we’re in the doldrums during the dark, dreary days. Locally, there are resources available. Peninsula Community Health Services provides 24-hour support for those who suffer from any kind of mental illness or depression. PCHS: “Mental and emotional health affects your every day life, your relationships with friends and family and your job. If you need help, we offer comprehensive behavioral health programs for a variety of needs. From individual, group and family therapy sessions to crisis management and interventions, we have trusted medical professionals with the skills to help.” You can contact PCHS at 24-Hour Mental Health Emergency Crisis Line (907) 283-7511. Because 20% of the population lives with mental illness, no one is truly unaffected by this growing issue, even if one only experiences the secondhand effects. If everyone is touched by mental health problems in some form, and we publicly address them in everyday life and even have a whole month dedicated to suicide awareness, why do people insist on clamping up when it comes to having these discussions around the holidays? FacebookTwitterEmailPrintFriendly分享Although the winter season begins with a bit of holiday cheer, many people feel a little “off” as the cold weather drags on. Depression can come on during any season, and although some people might think they feel just a little “off,” it is important to seek help. Now, don’t be fooled: There’s certainly a stigma toward mental illness in the U.S. no matter the time of year, however, the taboo quality surrounding the discussion of mental health grows exponentially during the winter months. This seems counterproductive since this is the time when issues such as depression increase in prevalence. While it is untrue that suicide rates spike around the holidays, research discovered that 30% to 40% of the population have anxiety and depression around this time, while 60% of people who already experience mental health issues display worsened symptoms, this is according to the U.S. Department of Health and Social Services. Bottom line, if you’ve been feeling depressed or sad no matter the time of year you should contact your mental health professional or your family doctor for a consultation. If you or someone you know is feeling helpless or is at-risk for suicide, call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255.last_img read more

Continue reading