9 Time-Saving Browser Shortcuts [Infographic]

first_imgWhile you’re spending time browsing the web on your mobile devices, chances are you’re probably using a laptop or desktop computer for your work projects. Over the years, you’ve probably developed your own set of keyboard shortcuts to quickly navigate browser windows and tabs. Wouldn’t it be nice to know more shortcuts to streamline your work? How about if you knew a shortcut to restore the last browser tab you closed?Or how about stopping a distracting animated GIF?This infographic from Visualistan offers nine shortcuts to save you time and effort as you browse the web. Most are common keyboard shortcuts you’ll be able to use across all browsers, but some may only work on Chrome. I knew the shortcut for switching between applications, but was glad to discover there’s a similar shortcut for switching between browser tabs. The entire text of the infographic is available. Source: VisualistanSave Time With These 9 Browser ShortcutsA shortcut to any website.Whatever you type into the URL bar can be surrounded by www. and .com by pressing CTRL + Enter on Windows.A shortcut to highlighting a URL. CTRL + L on Windows (Command + L on Mac) will highlight the address bar in Chrome, Opera, and Firefox.How to do a reverse image search.Press and hold “S” and right click an image to do reverse image search in Chrome.How to restore a closed tab in a browser.Pressing CTRL + Shift + T on Windows (Command + Shift + T on Mac) opens up the last tab you mistakenly closed. This is a godsend.How to switch between open windows.Using ALT + Tab key on Windows (Command + Tab on Mac) lets you switch between open applications easily.How to stop a distracting GIF.On most occasions, pressing ESC will halt animated GIFs that are distracting.Open an incognito window quickly.You might be aware of the incognito window option, but it can be tedious to go through the options to enable it. Instead CTRL + Shift + N opens up an incognito-mode window on the Chrome browser quickly.Clear cache with ease.Press CTRL + Shift + R on Windows (Command + Shift + R on Mac) and then refresh the page. All cache will be cleared.Do you use any of the nine shortcuts in your work? I’d love to hear what other browser shortcuts you like to use. Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Like this:Like Loading…RelatedQuick Tips and Shortcuts for Working on Your ChromebookIf you’re the owner of a new Chromebook, congrats! I’ve had a Chromebook for over a year and I love it. It’s my go-to device for conferences and when I’m traveling. Using my Chromebook is so much easier and convenient than lugging around my laptop. I have to admit, it…In “Technology”3 Technology Tips to Help You Work More EfficientlyWhen you use a smartphone, tablet, or laptop, you become accustomed to the shortcuts and quick ways to do things. Whether you’re opening a new browser tab, accessing Google Maps offline, or trying to edit text, we get accustomed over the years to doing things a certain way. And we…In “Technology”10 Things to Know About Chromebook AccessibilityAs Chromebooks become more commonplace, especially in schools where students and teachers use the popular laptop, it’s critical that Chromebooks have tools that make the web accessible to everyone. A number of new accessibility features have been added to the Chromebook with the latest release of Chrome OS, which rolled…In “Accessibility”last_img read more

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Ethiopia beckons intrepid travellers

first_imgThe view from Imet Gogo near Geech camp, Semien Mountains near Ras Dashan. Bet Giyorgis, one of the mysterious cross-shaped churches hewn out of rock at Lalibela. A view of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia’s capital and largest city, from the Sheraton hotel. Crowds gather at the Fasiladas’ bath in Gondar, Ethiopia, to celebrate Timket – the Epiphany for the Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahedo Church. (Images: Wikipedia)Samson Mulugeta Still stuck on the image of Ethiopia as a land of war and famine? Think again.These are the little-known facts about this Horn of Africa nation: it is the third most populous country in Africa at 74 million, is twice the size of France, and the climate in the highland capital of Addis Ababa is more akin to Johannesburg than nearby sweltering Khartoum, Sudan.After the ousting of a military dictator nearly two decades ago, Ethiopia has been one of the most stable countries in an African region home to such failed states as Somalia or rogue states such as Sudan, with its crisis in Darfur.But the current Ethiopian government is functional and thriving only in comparison to others in its neighborhood. Its human rights record has been criticised by the US State Department and the nation’s last election, in 2005, was marred by violence and irregularities.Despite these setbacks, Ethiopia has shown steady economic improvement in the last decade, including in the tourism sector, and is one of the world’s least-explored gems.To travellers and students of history, Ethiopia is a magical and enchanting land because of its vivid, uninterrupted connection to antiquity and the larger canvas of recorded human history.  Archeological finds have pointed to Ethiopia as the birth place of the oldest Homo sapiens. Pre-Christian Ethiopia was a major player during antiquity – the Old Testament mentions Ethiopia dozens of times.  Ethiopia’s ancient empire extended on both sides of the Red Sea – Ethiopian kings frequently ruled over south Arabia. Around the time of the birth of Christ, Ethiopia was a centre of commerce and learning along with Egypt, Persia and Greece.“Ethiopia always had a special place in my imagination and the prospect of visiting Ethiopia attracted me more strongly than a trip to France, England, and America combined,” Nelson Mandela wrote in his autobiography, Long Walk to Freedom. “I felt I would be visiting my own genesis, unearthing the roots of what made me an African.”With Axum at its capital, in what is now Tigray Province, Ethiopia’s recorded history dates back to 1 000 years before the birth of Christ.Its founding mythology is still steadfastly held by many modern Ethiopians, that a union of King Solomon and the Queen of Sheba begat a royal line that extended from Menelik I to Haile Selassie, whose reign was overthrown in 1974.Ethiopians believe that the Ark of the Covenant, containing the tablets of the 10 commandments, are kept at Mount Zion church in the ancient capital of Axum, guarded by a priest sworn never to leave the premises.Ethiopians have a unique alphabet dating back 2 000 years, rooted in the Gee’ez language which remains the language of the church while Amharic evolved into the people’s language, with a linguistic kinship akin to Latin and English.  Ethiopians keep time in a unique manner, counting the start of the day with one at daybreak (or what would be 7am in Western timekeeping) and ending it with 12 at sundown and then starting with one again. The Coptic calendar is also different. Ethiopia follows the Julian calendar and is marked its second millennium this last year, seven-and-a-half years after the Western calendar.The only African nation to avoid colonisation, Ethiopia was an inspiration to South Africa’s ruling African National Congress, and the Rastafarians who idolized Ras Teferi, who was later crowned as Haile Selassie.  Other intriguing aspects of Ethiopia’s heritage include it’s Jewish population (now almost entirely transplanted to Israel), its early acceptance of Christianity in 400 AD (before England, for example, became Christian) and  its veneration by the Prophet Mohammad, who exempted it from jihad, leaving Ethiopia an island of Christianity in a sea of Islam.Ethiopia is even the birthplace of that morning picker-upper the world cannot do without, coffee, whose name derives from Kefa, the region where it was first discovered, according to legend, by a goatherd named Kaldi.The ancient capital Axum, with its towering obelisks and royal tombs anchors one of the three legs of Ethiopia’s northern “historic route.” After invading and occupying Ethiopia from 1935 to 1941, fascist leader Benito Mussolini broke one of the obelisks into three pieces and shipped it to Italy. It was returned to Ethiopia recently after decades of lobbying by the Ethiopian government.The castles of Gonder are the second stop of the historic tour. Gonder was Ethiopia’s capital from 1635 to 1855 and is home to castles built by Emperor Fasilidas, a network of stone structures featuring sauna baths and lion cages.The final and arguably most stunning example of Ethiopia’s former glory is Lalibela, a mountain village in the highlands of Wello Province that pays homage to a sophisticated civilisation that saw itself as the embodiment of a new holy land.  King Lalibela, who had supposedly visited the holy land before he embarked on his building project, wanted to create a new Jerusalem. The stream flowing between the churches is named the River Jordan and the adjoining hill is known locally as Mount of Olives.Heading north from Addis Ababa, the capital, the first thing visitors see from the air as they approach the historic village is Lalibela’s most famous icon, the House of St George, the cross-shaped church.On a towering plateau formed by molten volcanic rock, St. George squats, carved into the rock as if by a giant hand wielding a laser-like surgical tool. It is in the shape of a cross, cut into the rock in a 12-by-12-metre trench, and is formed out of a single seamless rock.  The engineering marvel of churches’ design remains a mystery to this day. The precision, sophistication and astounding scale of the building have defied easy explanation by archeologists and historians. Ethiopian legend has it they were built in 24 years with the help of angels. Modern historians believe the churches took about 100 years to build.Lalibela has remained a living monument, to this day used as a place of worship by thousands of pilgrims who arrive from near and far.The Lalibela churches are among the World Heritage List, a selection of manmade and natural attractions judged by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (Unesco) to be of such universal value that they ”should be preserved for all time.”The Lalibela churches are, according to Unesco “a remarkable coupling of engineering and architecture and a unique artistic achievement.”It has astounded every visitor who came upon them, including Portuguese priest Francisco Alvares, the first European to visit Lalibela, in 1512.“I weary of writing more about these buildings,” he wrote. “Because it seems to me that I shall not be believed if I write more.”Several airlines, including Ethiopian Airlines, fly to Addis Ababa regularly from destinations around the world. There are daily flights from Addis Ababa to Lalibela. Flights on a fleet of turboprops from Addis Ababa-Gonder-Lalibela-Axum “historic route” costs US$400.Trips to Lalibela are best during the colorful festivals of Timkat (Epiphany, January 19) or Meskel Finding of the True Cross, September 27). However, flights and accommodation tend to be fully booked so planning ahead is essential during for visits during those events.Do you have queries or comments about this article? Email Mary Alexander at [email protected] articlesMount Mabu yields hidden bounty A holiday – in Zimbabwe? The treasures of Afrika House Saving priceless African history Biggest nature park in the world Useful linksEthiopian Airlines Lonely Planet – Ethiopia Ethiopian Tourism MediaEthiopia CyberEthiopialast_img read more

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All Change for Windows Server Users

first_imgIntel at CeBIT – Windows Server 2003: End of SupportThe end of life of Windows Server 2003 presents security and software issues for enterprises that stay on the platform. But there are opportunities for those who adopt the latest hardware and software platforms, including green IT and greater processing power. This video was original published on http://www.computerworlduk.com/sponsored-article/it-business/3608608/intel-at-cebit–windows-server-2003-end-of-support/last_img

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Wait, Why is Oklahoma State Redshirting Sophomores

first_imgWhen the 2015 Oklahoma State depth chart came out, there were some noticeable omissions. Boone went over a few of those earlier this week and brought up a name I hadn’t heard since he single-handedly tried to set OU’s offense back 15 years last December.Justin Phillips.Phillips had 10 of his 18 tackles last season in that Bedlam game, and yet he’s nowhere to be found on the depth chart. And he was even projected as a potential starter in the spring.So he’s either going to be special teams only again (which is mostly what he was last year until Bedlam) or the more interesting option (which Boone suggested). A redshirt. Wait, redshirting sophomores?Mike Gundy said it was an option earlier in August.“It’s us being honest with them and that they didn’t really get that year to develop,” said Gundy about the potential of redshirting a non-first year guy. Now that OSU is deeper, he has that leeway.“What you’ll do is put that young player who doesn’t redshirt his freshman year, he loses that extra time in the weight room because during the season he’s trying to get ready to play in the game and so he can’t devote himself to four to five days of a heavy workload.“His physical workload is limited based on getting ready to play on Saturday, and there’s a point where that can almost become a necessity for a college football player to get that extra workload during their time. It doesn’t always happen that way, but it’s beneficial. So we’re just honest and if a player said ‘I want to play’, then we’re going to play him because ultimately it’s their career, but we offer our opinion on what we think is best.”If Gundy can convince guys like Phillips that it would be beneficial to them in the long run, OSU is going to be in a good spot for the next few years (especially on defense). This also continues to soothe the pain of last year.If you’re looking for the comments section, it has moved to our forum, The Chamber. You can go there to comment and holler about these articles, specifically in these threads. You can register for a free account right here and will need one to comment.If you’re wondering why we decided to do this, we wrote about that here. Thank you and cheers!last_img read more

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