Gov. DeSantis appoints four to JNCs

first_img Jun 07, 2021 Top Stories Gov. Ron DeSantis recently made four appointments to Florida’s judicial nominating commissions.11th Circuit Judicial Nominating CommissionPedro M. Allende previously served as deputy assistant secretary for Infrastructure, Risk, and Resilience Policy at the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. He received his bachelor’s degree, master’s degree, and law degree from the University of Florida. Allende is appointed for a term ending July 1, 2023. Jesus M. Suarez is a partner at Genovese, Joblove & Battista, P.A. in Miami. His practices include the areas of business litigation, bankruptcy, and governmental law. He received his bachelor’s degree from the Loyola University Chicago and his law degree from the University of Florida. Suarez is appointed for a term ending July 1, 2024.13th Circuit Judicial Nominating CommissionPedro F. Bajo, Jr., is a partner at Bajo Cuva Cohen Turkel, P.A., in Tampa that specializes in all aspects of trial and appellate law. Bajo previously served as the 13th Circuit Judicial Nominating Commission chair from 2009 to 2010 and as a member from 2006 to 2010. He received his bachelor’s degree from the Southern Methodist University and his law degree from Florida State University. Bajo is appointed from a list of nominees submitted by The Florida Bar for a term ending July 1, 2024.17th Circuit Judicial Nominating CommissionCamille Coolidge Shotwell owns a law firm, Coolidge Law Group, P.A., that specializes in commercial real estate and family law in Ft. Lauderdale. She received her bachelor’s degree from Western Carolina University and law degree from Nova Southeastern University College of Law. Shotwell is appointed for a term ending July 1, 2024.center_img Gov. DeSantis appoints four to JNCslast_img read more

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Documentary Human Zoos Is Screened at Detroit’s African-American History Museum

first_imgCulture & Ethics Recommended TagsAfrican AmericansAmazon PrimeAnd Still We RiseAngela KingapesBronx ZooCharles H. Wright MuseumDetroitDiscovery Institutedocumentaryeugenicsforced sterilizationHuman ZooshumansJohn Westmissing linksMonkey HouseNew York CityOta BengaPlanned ParenthoodRacismSaartjie BaartmanSocial DarwinismValerie Sweeney PrinceWayne State University,Trending Email Print Google+ Linkedin Twitter Share Requesting a (Partial) Retraction from Darrel Falk and BioLogos Email Print Google+ Linkedin Twitter Share “A Summary of the Evidence for Intelligent Design”: The Study Guide Jane Goodall Meets the God Hypothesiscenter_img Congratulations to Science Magazine for an Honest Portrayal of Darwin’s Descent of Man Origin of Life: Brian Miller Distills a Debate Between Dave Farina and James Tour A few weeks ago on November 11, the Discovery Institute-produced documentary Human Zoos was screened before an engaged audience at the Charles H. Wright Museum in Detroit. The world’s largest museum devoted to African-American history, the Wright Museum is especially noted for its exhibition, And Still We Rise, which traces the African-American experience from its roots in Africa to its history in contemporary America through a series of immersive displays. Visitors journey through time as they walk through an African village, a slave fort and slave ship, the streets of Detroit in the early 20th century, and much more. Human Zoos was shown in the Wright Museum’s General Motors Theater. The film tells how thousands of indigenous peoples were put on public display in America in what scholars today call “human zoos.” One African man, Ota Benga, was actually displayed at the Bronx Zoo in New York City in a cage in its Monkey House.Humans as “Missing Links”These displays were often intended to portray non-whites as lower on the evolutionary scale than whites and as “missing links” between humans and apes. Human Zoos also explores the history of eugenics, the crusade by scientists and others to eliminate people considered evolutionarily unfit and to breed a “master race” based on the principles of Darwinian biology. Many of those targeted for forced sterilization by eugenicists were African-Americans or Hispanics.About 150 people attended the Wright Museum’s screening of Human Zoos, and the question and answer period went on for more than an hour — until after the Museum’s closing. Museum educator Angela King moderated the discussion, which featured Discovery Institute Senior Fellow John West (who wrote and directed Human Zoos) and African-American Studies professor Valerie Sweeney Prince of Wayne State University. Prince is a literary scholar who has explored the tragic story of  Saartjie Baartman, an African woman put on public display in Europe in the early 1800s and examined by pre-Darwinian scientists as a supposed link between humans and animals.Audible Gasps from the AudienceDuring the discussion, one audience member asked whether efforts by Planned Parenthood to target the African-American community for birth control were any different from the campaign by eugenicists to reduce the population from races they considered lower on the evolutionary scale. West responded that there was actually a direct historical connection between eugenics and the founder of Planned Parenthood, Margaret Sanger, who was a virulent racist and Social Darwinist. West said later that during the screening “there were audible gasps during parts of the film, and during the discussion afterward several members of the audience shared their own stories about how they had been personally impacted by scientific racism. They also expressed gratitude for how the film exposed the truth about what had happened to Ota Benga and others.”“As a filmmaker, it was humbling to listen to the reactions and to learn more about how the issues raised by the film continue to plague us,” said West. He added that it was an honor to have his film presented at the world’s largest African-American history museum, noting that he had first visited the Charles Wright Museum in 2010 to participate in a debate on the connection between Charles Darwin and scientific racism. “At the time, I was deeply moved by the Museum’s world-class exhibit And Still We Rise, and I vowed to someday bring my whole family to view it. Fortunately, my wife and children (now in their late teens!) were able to come with me to the showing, and so they were finally able to see the Museum.”Human Zoos can be watched for free on Amazon by Amazon Prime members, and it can also be purchased as a DVD or Blu-ray.  A Physician Describes How Behe Changed His MindLife’s Origin — A “Mystery” Made AccessibleCodes Are Not Products of PhysicsIxnay on the Ambriancay PlosionexhayDesign Triangulation: My Thanksgiving Gift to All Evolution Documentary Human Zoos Is Screened at Detroit’s African-American History MuseumEvolution News @DiscoveryCSCNovember 30, 2018, 3:57 PM Evolution NewsEvolution News & Science Today (EN) provides original reporting and analysis about evolution, neuroscience, bioethics, intelligent design and other science-related issues, including breaking news about scientific research. It also covers the impact of science on culture and conflicts over free speech and academic freedom in science. Finally, it fact-checks and critiques media coverage of scientific issues. Sharelast_img read more

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Eskom consults senior executives on Section 189 process

first_img RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Featured image: Stock Despite efforts to curb expenditure, Eskom’s operating costs have continued to increase dramatically while output has remained largely unchanged, the company stated on Wednesday.As a result, Eskom’s board of directors has decided to review the company’s organisational design to enhance operational and cost efficiencies. As such, Eskom’s board has approved a Section 189 process for its executive structure [F-Bands].Only members of the executive structure will be impacted. Eskom will share the updates with the relevant stakeholders as appropriate.This is developing story ESI Africa will keep updating as new information comes forth. UNDP China, CCIEE launch report to facilitate low-carbon development Finance and Policy BRICS AFD and Eskom commit to a competitive electricity sector Low carbon, solar future could increase jobs in the future – SAPVIA Generation TAGSEskom Previous articleDigital technologies’ impact on business earningsNext articleFuture Energy Nigeria: reimagining a global market Babalwa BunganeBabalwa Bungane is the content producer for ESI Africa – Clarion Events Africa. Babalwa has been writing for the publication for over five years. She also contributes to sister publications; Smart Energy International and Power Engineering International. Babalwa is a social media enthusiast.last_img read more

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