GBB: Berea-Midpark topples North Olmsted behind Marone’s 18-point effort

first_img Related TopicsBerea MidparkBerea-Midpark Girls BasketballNorth OlmstedNorth Olmsted Girls Basketball by Don DiFrancesco (@MayorNEOPrep)NORTH OLMSTED, OHIO– The Berea-Midpark Lady Titans put together a complete performance on Wednesday evening in North Olmsted. For most of the game, they dominated on both ends of the floor in defeating the Lady Eagles 74-30 in a Southwestern Conference matchup.Berea-Midpark (12-1, 11-0 SWC) received double figure scoring from three of their senior guards: Jada Marone had 18 points, Jasmine Kinsey tallied 11, and Lexie Scarton scored 10.North Olmsted (3-12, 1-10 SWC) was led by sophomore guard Mary Bloomfield who landed two long 3-pointers on her way to eight points.Berea-Midpark                                     17            15            16            26   =     74North Olmsted (home)                        2             15             9              4     =     30 NEO HS Stafflast_img read more

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REVIEW: “Georgia McBride” Offers Legendary Mix of Flash, Depth

first_imgPlaywright Matthew Lopez tackles tricky themes about creativity and risk taking in this world premiere, a charming show that debuted as a staged reading during last year’s New Play Summit at the Denver Center Theatre Company. A year later, director Mike Donahue’s fully realized production succeeds, thanks to its earnestness and the sizable skill of an impressive cast and crew.The combination of solid writing, expert performances and skilled work by the costume, lighting and set design crew makes “McBride” one of the most promising of several world premieres that have made up the DCTC’s 2013-14 season. Apart from some clunky plot structures and a few overly ambitious casting decisions, this premiere shows real promise of a long run outside of Denver.There’s real heart to the story of Casey (Ben Huber), an Elvis impersonator in the small town of Panama City, Fla. After his gig playing the King at a local bar disappears, he follows the example of drag queens Miss Tracy Mills (Matt McGrath) and Miss Rexy (Nick Mills), putting together his own drag queen persona to pay the bills and support his pregnant wife Jo (Jamie Ann Romero). The twist comes in the success and adulation that follows Casey’s transformation into Georgia McBride, a stage presence who combines the attitude of the King of Rock and Roll with the sensibilities of the top drag performers. As his reputation grows, Casey struggles with finding a way to tell his wife and his brother (a straight-laced candidate for school board) the truth about the reason for his sudden success.There’s maturity in the storytelling here. There are also larger-than-life drag queens, a whole mess of sequined dresses and a dense soundtrack featuring Broadway show tunes and heartbreaking ballads by Edith Piaf. The small ensemble cast shows a shared skill for tackling a wide range of roles. Huber isn’t the only one who takes on dual demands as Casey and his drag alter-ego, Georgia McBride. In addition to a heartfelt performance as Jo, Romero takes on the role of club owner Eddie. Even McGrath and Mills aren’t limited to their roles as drag queens — McGrath takes on the role of Beau, Casey’s brother, and Mills also plays Jason, Casey and Jo’s landlord. The ambitious casting works for the most part, and it aligns with the show’s deeper tone about playing different roles. Some of the double casting decisions are easier to buy than others, but the constantly shifting pool of four actors is one of the show’s most unique charms.What’s more, thanks to a constant stream of top-notch and entertaining drag performances, the comedy boasts an impressive show-within-a-show dynamic that makes up for a few occasional miscues. That balance between human drama and cabaret club also speaks to the deeper themes here. This show about the forced evolution of a small-town Elvis impersonator features fundamental conflicts about identity and passion. Lopez’s fundamental message ­— that venturing into the unknown can pay off in big ways — finds expression in a plot that’s far from formulaic. The main characters find moments of insight and depth in the most unlikely of places, and it’s a good bet the audience will too.THREE STARS OUT OF FOUR “The Legend of Georgia McBride” runs until Feb. 23 at the Denver Center for the Performing Arts, 1101 13th St., Denver. Tickets start at $47. Information: 303-893-4100 or denvercenter.org. There’s a lot more to “The Legend of Georgia McBride” than the glitzy costumes, lip-synced pop songs, acrobatic dance moves and fabulous drag routines.Then again, those elements don’t hurt in making the show genuinely funny, memorable and endearing.last_img read more

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