News / ‘Be alert’ warning to shippers as they face new low-sulphur fuel surcharges

first_img The Global Shippers Forum (GSF) has issued a warning to ocean freight customers as they find themselves saddled with the extra cost of cleaner fuel, compliant with the new IMO low sulphur regulations that came into effect last week.The new global legislation stipulates that a vessel either has to burn fuel with no more than 0.5% sulphur dioxide content, or use scrubber technology to clean fuel with a higher sulphur content.Although shippers have largely accepted paying more for low-sulphur fuel oil (LFSO), the GSF has warned shippers that picking up the tab for these higher costs is not solely down to them.GSF secretary general James Hookham said: “The additional burden of complying with tough new rules on emissions from vessels is a necessary but unwelcome start to 2020.“The shipping industry has widely assumed that the costs of cleaning up its environmental act can simply be passed onto its customers in the form of surcharges. Whether that will be the case will be the subject of individual negotiations over the coming months.“However, shippers should be demanding clear and consistent explanations of any surcharges demanded. GSF’s Top Ten Tips for Sulphur-Surcharged Shippers reminds our members of the ground rules and to scrutinise carefully any surcharge demands made during contract negotiations,” he explained.The GSF tips advise shippers not to lock-in LFSO surcharges into annual contracts currently being negotiated, as the price for the higher-grade fuel is likely to oscillate for some time as refiners react to higher levels of demand.The forum also calls for shipping lines to simplify how they calculate fuel surcharges – as well as how they explain them to customers.“If it looks like an arbitrary figure and feels like an arbitrary figure… then it probably is an arbitrary surcharge,” said Mr Hookham. “There is no single amount or simple percentage for the added cost of using low-sulphur fuel, so watch for rounded increases, or predictions that the same costs will apply all year and in all parts of the world – they won’t.”And he called for carriers to end the surcharge system altogether, reiterating GSF calls for container shipping lines to switch to all-in rates.“Ultimately, the industry needs to move on to a more mature pricing regime, with confidential contracting and all-inclusive charges becoming the ‘new normal’. The shipping industry needs to wean itself off surcharges just as much as high-sulphur fuels,” he said. By Gavin van Marle 06/01/2020last_img read more

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Health Ministry Invites Partnership for ChikV Study

first_imgAdvertisements RelatedNew Meat Stamps for Inspectors Photo: JIS PhotographerMinister of Health, Hon. Dr. Fenton Ferguson, addresses participants in the 5th staging of the National Health Research Conference at the Jamaica Conference Centre in downtown Kingston on Thursday, November 27. Pictured at the head table (from left) are: National Epidemiologist, Ministry of Health, Dr. Karen Webster; Director, Epidemiology Research Unit, Tropical Medicine Research Institute, University of the West Indies, Prof. Marshall Tulloch-Reid; and Advisor, Disease Prevention and Control, Pan American Health Organization (PAHO), Dr. Kam Sung Mung. RelatedFive Major Projects Completed at Mandeville Hospital Health Ministry Invites Partnership for ChikV StudyJIS News | Presented by: PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQualityundefinedSpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreenPlay Health Ministry Invites Partnership for ChikV Study Health & WellnessNovember 28, 2014Written by: Alecia Smith-Edwardscenter_img Related50 Projects Approved Under National CHIK-V Prevention Campaign FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail Health Minister, Hon. Dr. Fenton Ferguson is inviting the academic community to partner with the Government to undertake research on the Chikungunya (Chik-V) virus.Dr. Ferguson noted that more research is required to effectively deal with the outbreak, noting that what many persons have been reporting as being symptoms of the illness are, in some instances, dissimilar to data contained in material compiled on the virus.“I believe the academic community must be prepared with support coming from the National Health Fund (NHF), to do the scholarly work that is necessary in relation to our experience (with Chik-V),” he said.The Minister, who was addressing the 5th staging of the National Health Research Conference on November 27, at the Jamaica Conference Centre in downtown Kingston, said there are gaps in data in a number of areas, for which research “can assist us to create solutions that can benefit a number of our citizens”.He noted for example, that “we have diseases such as lupus for which we need to gather more information towards putting in place policies that can improve the lives of persons affected by these health issues.”“Our goal in health is to put systems in place to ultimately improve the lives of Jamaicans. This requires effort and partnership from all segments of the society and particularly those involved in research so that we can be guided by the information we need to make evidence based decisions and formulate evidence based policies,” he said.The Minister thanked those who have done studies, as well as researchers, who have made significant contributions to the country’s knowledge of the treatment and management of issues such as malnutrition and sickle cell anaemia, among other disease conditions.“I want you to continue along this path and increase your areas of focus, paying particular attention to issues that are significantly affecting our population,” he said.In the meantime, the Minister noted he has requested that the NHF focus more resources on research and health promotion initiatives, noting that the Fund has already spent $50 million this fiscal year on supporting research projects, and will increase its focus on this area.He said it is “totally inadequate” that in the NHF’s 10 years of operation, only $1 billion was spent on health promotion and prevention and research, while over $20 billion went into institutional and individual benefits.Held under the theme: ‘Healthy Individual, Healthy Community, Healthy Nation,’ the two-day conference seeks to highlight research carried out within the Ministry and educational institutions, while stimulating greater interest in research in health generally. Story HighlightsHealth Minister, Hon. Dr. Fenton Ferguson is inviting the academic community to partner with the Government to undertake research on the Chikungunya (Chik-V) virus.Dr. Ferguson noted that more research is required to effectively deal with the outbreak, noting that what many persons have been reporting as being symptoms of the illness are, in some instances, dissimilar to data contained in material compiled on the virus.The Minister said there are gaps in data in a number of areas, for which research “can assist us to create solutions that can benefit a number of our citizens”.last_img read more

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Pinehurst isn’t pristine, but that’s the point

first_imgPINEHURST, N.C. — Pinehurst No. 2 is anything but perfect for the U.S. Open, at least in the traditional sense of major championships in America. USGA executive director Mike Davis could not be any more thrilled. ”It’s awesome,” Davis said Monday as he gazed out at a golf course that looks like a yard that hasn’t been watered in a month. Sandy areas have replaced thick rough off the fairways. They are partially covered with that Pinehurst Resort officials refer to as ”natural vegetation,” but what most anyone else would simply call weeds. The edges of the bunkers are ragged. The turf is uneven just off some of the greens, with patches of no grass. Instead of verdant fairways from tee-to-green, the fairways are a blend of green, yellow and brown. Shortly after this Donald Ross gem was awarded its third U.S. Open in 15 years, the fabled No. 2 course went through a gutsy project to restore it to its natural look from yesteryear, before this notion that the condition of a course had to be perfect. Ernie Els, a two-time U.S. Open champion, was amazed when he walked off the 18th green. ”I wouldn’t call this an inland links, but it’s got that character,” he said. ”I was a bit nervous when I heard of the redo. But this looks like it’s been here for a long time.” Els has been playing the U.S. Open for two decades. He never imagined the ”toughest test in golf” without any rough. Nor does he think that will make it easier. ‘You don’t need it,” he said. ”When I played it in ’99, I didn’t like it. You hit it in the rough, you’re just trying to get it out. It was one-dimensional. Now, you’re going to have an unbelievable championship. ”If you miss the fairway, you’re not just going to wedge it out. You’ve got a chance to hit a miraculous shot. And then you could really be (in trouble). This is the way it used to be.” Els said the look of Pinehurst No. 2 reminded him of Royal Melbourne, and a guy who actually grew up next to Royal Melbourne agreed. ”These are Melbourne fairways,” Geoff Ogilvy said as he walked down the first fairway, where the grass was green for the first 200 yards before turning brown, and then going back to greener grass toward the green. ”This is kind of the way grass is supposed to be. In the summer it browns up, and in the winter it’s green. To my eye, this is what golf courses are supposed to look like.” Ogilvy understand architecture better than most players. He was looking at photos as Bill Coore and Ben Crenshaw worked on the restoration. He had heard stories. And it still managed to exceed his expectations. As for the idea of a U.S. Open without rough? He pointed to clumps of grass in the sandy areas, and some of the wiregrass bushes. And yes, the weeds. ”Look, the reality is there is rough there,” he said. ”It’s probably what rough used to be like before we had crazy irrigation.” The past two U.S. Open champions finished over par – Webb Simpson at Olympic Club, Justin Rose at Merion, both at 1-over. A third straight U.S. Open champion over par would be the longest streak in nearly 60 years. Not many were willing to bet against that. ”I’ve never played anything like it,” Jordan Spieth said. ”And it’s already – right now, with the pins in the middle of the greens – hard enough for even par to win. It’s going to be extremely challenging. But at the same time, it’s a great test.” More than a great test, Davis is hopeful it sends a great message. The USGA has been preaching in recent years to get away from the idea that golf courses have to be perfectly manicured to be great. Pinehurst No. 2, and perhaps Chambers Bay next year outside Seattle, allows a chance to show the golfing public what it means. The restoration project involved removing some 35 acres of sod and keeping only 450 of the 1,150 sprinkler heads. Water use is down an estimated 40 percent. ”It’s look back in the past, but it’s really looking forward to the future,” Davis said. ”Owners, operators and superintendents won’t give you this until the golfers think it’s OK. ”At private clubs, unless the greens committee says, ‘This is what we want,’ the superintendent won’t do it. It’s people thinking, ‘This looks fine.”’ Pinehurst No. 2 effectively presents the opposite perception of Augusta National. For years, superintendents have complained that too many courses wanted to be just like the home of the Masters in the quality – near perfection – of the conditions. ”Hopefully, this sets a precedent,” Ogilvy said. ”If Augusta has been the model everyone followed, hopefully this shows that it doesn’t have to be that way to be great.”last_img read more

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