CU-Boulder Alumni Association To Present Highest Honors On May 8

first_imgShare Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mail Published: March 19, 2001 The CU-Boulder Alumni Association will present eight members of the university community with its highest honors during the 71st annual Alumni Awards on May 8. The awards ceremony will be held at 7 p.m. in Old Main and is free and open to the public. The 2001 George Norlin Award honoring distinguished alumni for lifetime achievement and a devotion to the betterment of society will be presented to John Farrington. The physician, who has bachelor’s and medical degrees from CU, served his native Boulder for more than 50 years as a compassionate and committed internist and was instrumental in the growth of Boulder Community Hospital. Three faculty and staff members will receive Robert Stearns Awards for extraordinary achievement and service to the university:o Jean Delaney, an alumna who has demonstrated superb leadership and management skills, has served on the CU-Boulder staff for 28 years as director of the Office of International Education, vice chancellor of student affairs and currently manages a program to improve student services.o Dennis Jackson, a member of the music faculty since 1971, is a highly respected voice teacher who has trained world-renowned singers and thousands of other CU students in opera and lyric theater. He also has taught the love of music to alumni and children through various outreach programs he has created.o Richard Jessor, a CU faculty member with the Institute of Behavioral Science for 50 years, has garnered an international reputation for his sophisticated, groundbreaking research in problem behavior theory, notably in alcohol and drug abuse. His colleagues consider him a role model as an exemplary faculty member. Bruce Benson of Denver and Jeanne Manning of Boulder will receive Alumni Recognition Awards for their service to CU. Benson is a significant donor to the university and chairs CU’s current fund-raising campaign. Manning has volunteered for CU since 1964, notably with the Graduate School Advisory Council and the Center for the Humanities and the Arts. State Rep. Gayle Berry of Grand Junction will receive the 2001 Legislative Recognition Award for her efforts on behalf of higher education in Colorado as a member of the Joint Budget Committee. Steve Taniguchi of Boulder will earn the Board of Directors Award for his eight years of dedicated service to the Alumni Association as a board member and chair of the board from 1997 to 1999. For reservations to the awards ceremony please contact Nancy Rasmussen at (303) 492-2722 or 1-800-492-7743 or e-mail [email protected]last_img read more

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Thousands Gather For Women’s March In Atlanta

first_img Legal Advocate Discusses Medical Abuse At Shut Down Georgia ICE Facility Share 3:59Thousands of people gathered in downtown Atlanta, despite pouring rain and thunderstorms Saturday morning and early into the afternoon in response to the inauguration of President Donald Trump.It was a sea of colors in front of the Center for Civil and Human Rights as people brought their handwritten signs, some wrapped in plastic for the rain.Speakers, including Congressman John Lewis, rallied the crowd as they readied to march towards the Georgia State Capitol. Atlanta police estimated the total number of demonstrators to be around 60,000 people, having estimated about 10,000 people earlier in the day.Lewis told the crowd they couldn’t afford to be silent.“We’re going to send a message,” Lewis said. “I know something about marching.”As Lewis took the stage, the crowd chanted “District Five! District Five!” in support of Lewis and in reaction to tweets Trump wrote about Lewis’s congressional district being “in horrible shape and falling apart.”“I come here to say to you, don’t let anybody, anybody turn you around,” Lewis said. “And never, never ever give up, and never lose hope.”Lewis boycotted Friday’s inauguration. In an NBC interview, Lewis said he didn’t see the President as “legitimate” because of questions about Russia’s interference with the U.S. elections.  Trump, in response, said in tweets that Lewis was “all talk” and that he should focus on his district.Lewis, told the crowd to organize and register to vote, before he headed to the front of the crowd to be among the ones to lead the march.“The next election we must get out and vote like we never ever voted before,” Lewis said.Up at the very front of the march was Atlanta street performer, Baton Bob, wearing a corset and a red, sparkly masquerade mask, twirling his baton and blowing his whistle as led thousands of marchers through the streets.Suzette Hearn of Lilburn came to the demonstration with her daughter Anne Huff, donning bright pink, cat-eared “pussy hats” that she knitted.  She said the hats that some others in the crowd and in marches across the country wore, were a symbol for women’s empowerment.“I think it’s important to be ever vigilant, because you can so easily lose your rights,” Hearn said.Other signs alluded to Trump’s comments about groping women’s genitals, made in a video that surfaced during the campaign. Trump has denied accusations of sexual assault.One sign, held by a young girl, read “Keep your tiny hands off my rights.”Among the crowd was Jimmy Kamanjoh of Lawrenceville, who held his 3-year-old daughter, Hannah, high up on his shoulders. He said he was marching in solidarity for women’s rights, but also for the rights of minorities and immigrants as someone who immigrated to the United States from Kenya.“We want him to know that we are here, and we’re going to hold him accountable to his actions,” he said.Rita Winings of Atlanta said the severe rain almost deterred her, but she was determined to march. The last time she marched, she said, was in the 60s against the Vietnam War. She said she came on Saturday because she was concerned about today’s political climate.  “I have three little granddaughters, and I want the world to be a nicer place for them than it has been for me,” she said.Her friend, Larry Wood, of Atlanta, said he was concerned about Trump’s agenda on issues including healthcare and gay rights.“My husband and I were married about a year and a half ago, and I don’t want that overturned,” he said.Wood said  he also disagrees with Trump’s characterization of the country.  In his augural address, Trump vowed to end what he called “American carnage.”“There’s no carnage – it’s a beautiful place” Wood said. See more scenes from the Atlanta march below. [View the story “Atlanta Women’s March” on Storify]Like us on Facebook Related Stories 3:59 | Play story Add to My ListIn My List For Whom The Bell Rings ‘It’s Fractured’: Georgia Lt. Gov. Geoff Duncan On Healing Republican Partylast_img read more

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Lion’s Choice coming to former Winstead’s site at 103rd and Metcalf

first_imgThe former Winstead’s at Metcalf 103 Shopping Center is on its way to becoming a Lion’s Choice. The Overland Park Planning Commission gave its approval this week to a plan to build a new drive-thru on the site of the former hamburger and shake restaurant.Photo credit Lion’s Choice.Lion’s Choice is a St. Louis-based quick serve restaurant featuring roast beef sandwiches. It was founded in 1967 and has been expanding in the Kansas City area recently. New locations recently opened in Olathe and Independence.Putting a 2,500-square-foot Lion’s Choice on the southeast corner of 103rd Street and Metcalf Avenue was a straightforward swap that the commission approved with little discussion. The new restaurant will be smaller than the existing Winstead’s, which was 4,860 square feet, and it will be built closer to Metcalf. But it is expected to generate less average daily traffic than Winstead’s, according to city documents.Winstead’s white tile eateries have been a Kansas City icon for 75 years and received high praise from food critic Calvin Trillin. But their numbers have shrunk in the past few years. The company’s website still lists restaurants in Leawood, Lenexa and 107th Street and Roe Avenue in Overland Park, as well as the Plaza site.The Metcalf 103 Shopping Center location closed in 2015. Additional locations in Merriam and downtown Overland Park closed in 2017.Last month, the Lenexa Planning Commission approved plans to demolish the Winstead’s building on 95th Street and replace it with a new Raising Cane’s location. If the Lenexa Winstead’s closes, the Overland Park location near I-435 will be the last remaining spot for the eatery in the Shawnee Mission area.last_img read more

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Online Registration For Kindergarten; NM PreK Opens April 6

first_imgLAPS News:Los Alamos Public Schools reports that online registration for Kindergarten for 2020-2021 at Aspen, Barranca, Chamisa, Mountain and Piñon elementary schools will be available Monday, April 6, 2020 through the LAPS website.Registration is an important step to ensure that your child is placed in a kindergarten class for the upcoming school year.To enroll your child, simply visit the LAPS Registration page at laschools.net/registration. From the Registration page, choose the Kindergarten tab to begin the application.Children who turn five before 12:01 a.m. Sept. 1, 2020, are eligible to be enrolled in kindergarten for the 2020-2021 school year. The first day of school is Aug. 13, 2020.Click here for more information on documentation required for new student enrollment. Kindergarten students who live outside of Los Alamos County must complete an Open Enrollment Application, which also can be found at laschools.net/registration.In addition, the applications for the New Mexico PreK Lottery also will open Monday, April 6, 2020. LAPS currently has a New Mexico PreK program at Piñon Elementary School.LAPS hopes to receive funding to offer additional New Mexico PreK programs in Los Alamos for the 2020-2021 school year. There is a maximum enrollment based on available funding so applications will be entered into a lottery for acceptance into the program. Parents will be allowed to select a program in Los Alamos or White Rock based on availability. The lottery opens at 8 a.m. and will be accessible at laschools.net. Lottery selection will be made in June 2020.For questions or more information, contact Sandra Osborn at [email protected] or 505.663.2228.last_img read more

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Burkhalter wins SCRA awards

first_imgThe rigging, lifting and transport provider was presented with the awards at SCRA’a annual awards dinner in Scottsdale, Arizona, USA. Rigging Job of the Year was awarded for Burkhalter’s rigging, positioning and setting of the new Galveston Causeway railroad bridge, and the removal of the existing bascule road bridge. The new 118 m wide, 1360.8 tonne bridge was delivered to the jobsite via barge and set into place with only 3 cm of horizontal clearance on either side. Challenges included strong currents, coastal winds and gas and water lines running underneath the channel limiting the depth to which the barge could be lowered. Moreover, the project had to be executed within a strict 7-hour time limit to allow for scheduled rail traffic to resume. The existing rail bridge was removed in a five-hour window, provided by a second railway line closure. To safely move the 771 tonne bridge, Burkhalter had to engineer a lifting solution to shift the bridge’s centre of gravity by 45 degrees to load it onto a waiting river barge. Hauling Job of the Year was awarded for the transportation of two hydrogen sulphide absorbers to Mississippi Power’s Kemper County IGCC project. Each absorber measured 72.5 m x 6.4 m x 6.1 m and weighed just shy of 647 tonnes. The absorbers were delivered by barge from Port of Mobile, Alabama to Bigbee Valley, Mississippi. From Bigbee, each unit was shifted using 160-axles of Goldhofer modular transporters to the Kemper County facility 122 km away. According to Burkhalter, this project was the largest-ever transported on public highways in Mississippi, and one of the heaviest consignments shifted on a US highway.The award-winning Rigging Job of the Year www.burkhalter.netwww.scranet.orglast_img read more

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