At the top since the turn of the millennium: Admiral chairman steps down

Admiral is the only FTSE 100 firm which has its headquarters in Wales. Local business champions hailed Lyons’ impact and the boost his actions had made to the local economy.“Under the chairmanship of Alastair Lyons, the Admiral Group, which is Wales’ largest private business, has played an integral part in the transformation of Cardiff’s services sector,” said Chris Sutton, lead director at JLL Cardiff and Chair of Central Cardiff Enterprise Zone.”When he took up this post in in 2000, Cardiff was transitioning from a maritime trade city to the financial and professional services hub which now employs 40,000 people and has an economic output in excess of £2 billion.” At the top since the turn of the millennium: Admiral chairman steps down During Lyons’ tenure he oversaw car insurance specialist’s float on the London Stock Exchange in 2004.Read more: Facebook rules sink Admiral’s insurtech plansAdmiral, which has said it could move its European business to Ireland or another country if British insurers lose their right to sell their products across Europe as a consequence of leaving the EU, said a new chairman will be elected at the firm’s AGM this Spring.Chief executive David Stevens said: “There are very few people who deserve as much credit for Admiral’s success over the last sixteen years as Alastair. He’s been everything our shareholders, and indeed our staff whatsapp Share Wednesday 25 January 2017 9:13 pm Oliver Gill whatsapp Admiral non-executive chairman Alastair Lyons will retire in April after nearly 17 years in the role. “It has been fantastic to have been on the journey with Admiral since the management buy-out, a journey which I am confident will continue to deliver sustained success,” said Lyons. The way the business has developed has been astonishing and a tribute to a great team that has created a culture that breeds innovation, the drive and ability to succeed, openness and transparency. I shall miss it, and them, greatly. by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeMisterStoryWoman Files For Divorce After Seeing This Photo – Can You See Why?MisterStoryMoneyPailShe Was A Star, Now She Works In ScottsdaleMoneyPailUnify Health LabsRandy Jackson: This 3 Minute Routine Transformed My HealthUnify Health LabsAtlantic MirrorA Kilimanjaro Discovery Has Proved This About The BibleAtlantic MirrorWarped SpeedCan You Name More State Capitals Than A 5th Grader? Find Out Now!Warped SpeedOne-N-Done | 7-Minute Workout7 Minutes a Day To a Flat Stomach By Using This 1 Easy ExerciseOne-N-Done | 7-Minute WorkoutFinanceChatterViewers Had To Look Away When This Happened On Live TVFinanceChatterLiver Health1 Bite of This Melts Belly And Arm Fat (Take Before Bed)Liver Health2021 Buicks | Search AdsIntroducing The Head Turning 2021 Buicks!2021 Buicks | Search Ads read more

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Gardentalk – Deadheading and division

first_imgGardentalk | Juneau | OutdoorsGardentalk – Deadheading and divisionJune 23, 2017 by Matt Miller, KTOO Share:Close up view of daffodils in a North Douglas yard that disparately need to be deadheaded. (Photo by Matt Miller/KTOO)Flowers and blooms from this spring’s annuals and bulbs are probably looking pretty pitiful by now. Beside just aesthetics, it’s also a good idea to start deadheading or cutting off the seed pods and wilted blooms of some plants.As Master Gardener Ed Buyarski explained in the latest edition of Gardentalk, deadheading allows bulbs and plants like fuschias or rhododendrons to devote their energy to perpetuation instead of propagation.“That takes a lot of energy from the plant which can be better put into growing more roots,” Buyarski said. “Or, with the annuals, it will tell them ‘we got to keep flowering so can make seeds to survive because we’re going to die in October or maybe earlier.’”Buyarski also reminds Southeast gardeners that it’s still a good time to divide primoses and primulas. Rhubarb and other perennials like the trollius or the globeflower, which bloomed early, also can be divided now.“I have people who watch me divide a perennial and they think I am sorely abusing that poor plant,” Buyarski said. In most cases, a well-placed sharp shovel or spade can do the trick. If you decide to dig out the plant first, then a hatchet may be necessary to split up the plant and its roots.”“We want to keep several of those growing points together with a good clump of roots that we will then replant,” Buyarski said.Mix in some compost or better soil before replanting. Listen to June 22 Gardentalk segment about deadheading and dividing:Audio Playerhttps://media.ktoo.org/2017/06/garden062217.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.Gardentalk is a weekly feature that airs every Thursday morning on KTOO’s Morning Edition program. You can sign up for the podcast or ask your own question for gardening help by going to the Gardentalk archive page.Share this story:last_img read more

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