SVC Bank joins hands with Bhatia Hospital

first_img The missing informal workers in India’s vaccine story Phoenix Business Consulting invests in telehealth platform Healpha By EH News Bureau on June 30, 2017 News Share MaxiVision Eye Hospitals launches “Mucormycosis Early Detection Centre” SVC Bank joins hands with Bhatia Hospital Launches special programme and Smiley Bank to express gratitude towards doctorsSVC Bank in association with Bhatia Hospital conducted a special programme in the hospital premises on the occasion of Doctors’ Day.The programme saw SVC Bank joining hands with the patients of Bhatia Hospital, their families and the staff and management to recognise the contribution of doctors towards the health and well being of the society. Doctors’ Day is celebrated across India in the memory of the legendary physician and second Chief Minister of West Bengal Dr Bidhan Chandra Roy.SVC Bank also came up with a unique initiative fondly referred to as ‘Smiley Bank for Doctors’where patients and their families prescribed to an unusual smiley coin aka an ‘emoticoin’ that the bank introduced specially for the occasion. All the coins were then deposited into a large piggy bank called the SVC Smiley Bank, which was later opened in the presence of the entire staff, patients and Bank representatives. The coins for all the doctors were put up on display. center_img Indraprastha Apollo Hospitals releases first “Comprehensive Textbook of COVID-19” Read Article Heartfulness group of organisations launches ‘Healthcare by Heartfulness’ COVID care app WHO tri-regional policy dialogue seeks solutions to challenges facing international mobility of health professionals Related Posts Menopause to become the next game-changer in global femtech solutions industry by 2025last_img read more

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Four Argos Earn All-GSC Honors for the No. 7 UWF Women’s Tennis Team

first_imgFour Argos Earn All-GSC Honors for the No. 7 UWF Women’s Tennis Team Bonardi earns GSC Player of the Year May 1, 2019 BIRMINGHAM, Ala. – The Argos Women’s Tennis team has four players earning All-GSC Honors. Berta Bonardi and Karolina Silwanowicz each earned First Team All-GSC for the first time in their career. Heather Mixon and Dianna Vlad each earned Second Team All-GSC. Berta Bonardi though, also was named the GSC Player of the Year for 2019. Nationally ranked all season No. 1 Berta Bonardi earned her spot at No. 1 and fought to keep it. This season Bonardi went 18-1 overall at the 1 spot in singles and went 14-2 overall in doubles at the 1 and 2 spot. In the GSC, Bonardi went undefeated in 1 singles going 9-0 and 1 and 2 doubles going 8-0. Bonardi was named GSC Player of the Week 6 times this season. Bonardi’s only singles loss of the season came from an injury she faced and had to retire the match.Karolina Silwanowicz battled this season with injuries and yet still had a fantastic season. Silwanowicz has been consistently nationally ranked in singles with her record of 12-5 overall and undefeated 7-0 against GSC teams playing all through the 1, 2, and 3 spots.Heather Mixon is wrapping up an outstanding tennis career at UWF. This season, Mixon was a consistent go-to win for the Argos in singles at the 4-6 spots with an overall record of 18-4 and 10-1 against GSC teams. In Heather’s career, she has only lost once to a GSC team in singles and that was this season. Overall, Mixon has gone 35-1 in the GSC in singles. Mixon also earned GSC Player of the Week once this season for clinching the match against No. 3 Saint Leo in a three set battle.Dianna Vlad was a leading senior this season for the Argos going undefeated in GSC conference play and having a terrific senior year. Vlad went 16-5 in singles overall and 8-0 in conference. In doubles, Vlad was 15-3 at 1 and 2 spot and 8-0 against GSC teams.To keep up with the Women’s Tennis team and for more information you can follow the women on Instagram @uwfwomenstennis. You can also follow the team on twitter @TennisUwf. #GoArgosPrint Friendly Version Sharelast_img read more

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Paris Catacombs open at night ahead of Halloween

first_imgPARIS | As if visiting the Paris Catacombs in the daytime wasn’t creepy enough — you can now visit the underground maze of skeletons after nightfall, too. That is if you dare defy the warning at the entrance: “Stop, this is the empire of Death.” The subterranean tunnels, stretching 2 kilometers (1.2 miles), cradle the bones of some 6 million Parisians from centuries past and once gave refuge to smugglers.Twenty meters (66 feet) beneath the French capital’s medieval streets, labyrinthine walls of bones and skulls bring visitors into the city of the dead, in a spooky atmosphere that attracts history enthusiasts as well as visitors looking for a chilling place to celebrate Halloween.The site used to close at 5 p.m., but is now staying open until 8 p.m. The change is mainly aimed at allowing more people to visit and reducing long lines, but it also adds to the thrill: entering and leaving the catacombs after dark feels different from doing it in daylight.Human remains started to be transferred to the former underground quarries of Paris in 1786, when the main cemetery of Paris —the Cemetery of Innocents — was closed for public health reasons. From 1809 on, the catacombs were rearranged into organized galleries, with piled bones forming walls and pillars, and even some artistic shapes made of femurs and skulls.Sacred and profane maxims and poems are posted around the galleries, such as: “Think in the morning that perhaps you won’t survive until evening, and in the evening that perhaps you won’t survive until morning.”Valerie Guillaume, director of the Catacombs, stressed the philosophical nature of the unusual tourist site.“The place was not conceived to be a horror place, but as a reflection on the meaning of life and death,” she said.Sylvie Robin, the Catacombs’ curator, described the extensive smuggling that went on in the tunnels in the past and contributed to its scary reputation.“That’s the origin of all the legends,” she said, because the smugglers used to scare the Parisians with lights and noises, so that no one would come and see what they were doing.Open from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. (last admission at 7 p.m.), closed on Mondays and public holidays. General admission: 10 euros (about $12.70). Tour of 2 kilometers (1.2 miles) takes around 45 minutes, with 130 steps to go down and 83 steps back up to street level. Not accessible to people with reduced mobility.Follow Sylvie Corbet on Twitter at www.twitter.com/SylvieCorbetlast_img read more

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