News / ‘Be alert’ warning to shippers as they face new low-sulphur fuel surcharges

first_img The Global Shippers Forum (GSF) has issued a warning to ocean freight customers as they find themselves saddled with the extra cost of cleaner fuel, compliant with the new IMO low sulphur regulations that came into effect last week.The new global legislation stipulates that a vessel either has to burn fuel with no more than 0.5% sulphur dioxide content, or use scrubber technology to clean fuel with a higher sulphur content.Although shippers have largely accepted paying more for low-sulphur fuel oil (LFSO), the GSF has warned shippers that picking up the tab for these higher costs is not solely down to them.GSF secretary general James Hookham said: “The additional burden of complying with tough new rules on emissions from vessels is a necessary but unwelcome start to 2020.“The shipping industry has widely assumed that the costs of cleaning up its environmental act can simply be passed onto its customers in the form of surcharges. Whether that will be the case will be the subject of individual negotiations over the coming months.“However, shippers should be demanding clear and consistent explanations of any surcharges demanded. GSF’s Top Ten Tips for Sulphur-Surcharged Shippers reminds our members of the ground rules and to scrutinise carefully any surcharge demands made during contract negotiations,” he explained.The GSF tips advise shippers not to lock-in LFSO surcharges into annual contracts currently being negotiated, as the price for the higher-grade fuel is likely to oscillate for some time as refiners react to higher levels of demand.The forum also calls for shipping lines to simplify how they calculate fuel surcharges – as well as how they explain them to customers.“If it looks like an arbitrary figure and feels like an arbitrary figure… then it probably is an arbitrary surcharge,” said Mr Hookham. “There is no single amount or simple percentage for the added cost of using low-sulphur fuel, so watch for rounded increases, or predictions that the same costs will apply all year and in all parts of the world – they won’t.”And he called for carriers to end the surcharge system altogether, reiterating GSF calls for container shipping lines to switch to all-in rates.“Ultimately, the industry needs to move on to a more mature pricing regime, with confidential contracting and all-inclusive charges becoming the ‘new normal’. The shipping industry needs to wean itself off surcharges just as much as high-sulphur fuels,” he said. By Gavin van Marle 06/01/2020last_img read more

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Google’s Android licensing regime in the spotlight

first_img Tags HomeDevicesNews Google’s Android licensing regime in the spotlight Related AndroidGoogleMicrosoftNokia Google pulls plug on Android Things Steve works across all of Mobile World Live’s channels and played a lead role in the launch and ongoing success of our apps and devices services. He has been a journalist…More Read more Author Google has used “little-known contract restrictions” to compel device makers to install all of its apps on Android devices, with the prominence it requires, including setting them as defaults, according to a blog post from an associate professor at Harvard Business School.According to Benjamin Edelman, in order to obtain apps such as Google Search, Maps and YouTube, vendors must sign a Mobile Application Distribution Agreement (MADA), which contains the requirement to bundle the full suite of Google apps, including guidelines on where specific apps are placed.And the MADA also includes a clause which prohibits vendors from disclosing its existence, although it has been disclosed in the Oracle versus Google lawsuit – but the document was not made available online.Edelman said that while a vendor may feel that a specific product is available which is competitive with the Google alternative, others are crucial to a modern smartphone – for example the Google Play content store, or YouTube app. The need for these apps means that a vendor is locked into using the full Google portfolio, even where alternatives exist.While the post notes that other apps can be installed alongside, this creates duplication for users, and “in the key categories of search and location”, Google’s apps must be set as default.The news comes shortly after Android Police reported that in order to gain access to the Google Mobile Services portfolio, the search giant is set to force device vendors to adopt newer versions of the Android platform – there had been some criticism that vendors were still offering smartphones powered by early versions of the OS.The latest version of Android (KitKat) has been designed to work on devices with less capable hardware, removing one reason for vendors to stick with earlier incarnations.And as more and more Android functionality is evolved to include integration with Google’s cloud services, functionality is being migrated from the core open source version of Android (AOSP) to become part of Google Mobile Services.According to ABI Research, the number of devices using Android, but not Google’s products and services, is on the increase, in no small part due to the use of the platform by vendors in China.To offer a compelling device internationally without including Google services, a vendor would need to source alternative location services, search tools and app store, among others.But Amazon, for example, has already done this, and it is reported that Nokia is considering following a similar path, using Microsoft-powered alternatives – and in many ways, Microsoft is one of the few companies able to compete with Google on such a broad level.center_img Steve Costello AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInLinkedInShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to MoreAddThisMore 18 FEB 2014 Previous ArticleAirtel confirms Loop deal; plans Mumbai’s largest mobile networkNext ArticleSingTel linked to AIS shareholder stake — report Devices Google taps retail with NYC store Google refreshes Nest Hublast_img read more

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Diego Simeone: Atletico Madrid don’t practise penalties

first_img “Behind Juanfran’s winning penalty is a lot of hard work from a lot of people and it’s a great thrill for us to be in the quarters. “It was tough last year and it was tough tonight because it’s not easy in these situations. It was like a chess game. 16/03/2016 The coach explained his assistant Mono Burgos is the man who picks the takers for shoot-outs, after they beat PSV in one on Tuesday night to reach the Champions League quarter-finals.  “We don’t practice penalties because it makes no sense,” said Simeone after the game. Diego Simeone says Atletico Madrid players do not practise penalties “because it makes no sense”.  Upd. at 11:06 “German Burgos chose the players for the shoot-out last year against Bayer Leverkusen and he did it again tonight – we have to congratulate him. CET Sport EN “We will continue competing and we won’t underestimate what it means to get to the last eight.”last_img read more

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