Pharmalittle: Will countries nationalize anti-coronavirus supplies? Pandemic halts some academic labs

first_img STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. Unlock this article by subscribing to STAT+ and enjoy your first 30 days free! GET STARTED By Ed Silverman March 16, 2020 Reprints Tags pharmalitleSTAT+ Good morning, everyone, and welcome to another working week. This week, however, ushers in a new era of sorts, as many of us greatly alter long-standing routines, at least for a while. Nonetheless, remaining focused can be a good thing, so please join us as we continue one of our own rituals — the celebrated brewing of the cup of stimulation. Meanwhile, we have once again assembled a few items of interest to help you get started. We hope your day goes well and you remain healthy.An allegation that the Trump administration tried to secure exclusive rights to the production of an experimental coronavirus vaccine in Germany has revived concerns that countries worldwide might move to nationalize key supplies to respond to the growing pandemic, STAT explains. The allegation, first reported in German media and later echoed by that nation’s health minister, centered on the suggestion that the Trump administration sought to strike a deal with CureVac, a drug maker based in Germany but that also has operations in the U.S. What is it? Pharmalot Ed Silverman Log In | Learn More What’s included?center_img Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. About the Author Reprints GET STARTED Pharmalot Columnist, Senior Writer Ed covers the pharmaceutical industry. Pharmalittle: Will countries nationalize anti-coronavirus supplies? Pandemic halts some academic labs [email protected] @Pharmalot Alex Hogan/STATlast_img read more

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Trouble for Free Basics in India and Egypt

first_img Related Kavit Majithia Opposition continues to mount against Facebook’s roll-out of its Free Basics initiative in India, with a number of tech companies reportedly voicing concern over the service, while the social giant has also encountered a hurdle in Egypt.India probeAccording to Reuters, nine tech start-ups, including Alibaba-backed Paytm, wrote to Telecom Regulatory Authority of India (TRAI) urging it to ensure internet access was allowed without differential pricing.“There is no reason to create a digital divide by offering a walled garden of limited services in the name of providing access to the poor,” read a letter seen by the publication.Late last month, TRAI told Facebook’s partner in India, Reliance Communications, to put a halt on its Free Basics roll-out, while asking Facebook for more information about the zero rating initiative.It then released a consultation paper requesting industry feedback on the Free Basics concept, for which it said it received a record number of submissions.However, more than three quarters of the 1.8 million comments submitted via Facebook will be disregarded as they did not adhere to the correct format, said TRAI. Facebook had too been urging users in India to submit feedback via its social media network and through mobile phones.Critics of the service, a product of Facebook’s internet.org initiative, claim it violates principles of net neutrality by offering access to certain web services on mobile devices for free, including Facebook’s social media network.Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg has since hit back, telling Economic Times newspaper that “for India to make progress, more than 1 billion people need to be connected to the internet”.“What reason is there for denying people free access to vital services for communication, education, healthcare, employment, farming and women’s rights?”A final policy decision is expected to made by regulators next month.Egypt banAdding to the company’s woes regarding service, Free Basics was also suspended in Egypt late last week after the social media giant failed to renew a permit required by the government.Free Basics launched in Egypt two months ago in collaboration with Etisalat. The suspension is not related to security concerns, according to reports. India adds detail on network equipment restrictions India to shun China vendors in 5G trials Previous ArticleOrange, Bouygues €10B takeover talks progressing – reportNext ArticleAsia Briefs: China’s operators invested $14B in 4G last year, Huawei expects 2015 revenue to jump 35% & more Kavit joined Mobile World Live in May 2015 as Content Editor. He started his journalism career at the Press Association before joining Euromoney’s graduate scheme in April 2010. Read More >> Read more HomeAsiaNews Trouble for Free Basics in India and Egyptcenter_img Asia FacebookFree BasicsIndia AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInLinkedInShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to MoreAddThisMore 04 JAN 2016 Tags Australia funds regulator to oversee new media law Authorlast_img read more

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Pinehurst isn’t pristine, but that’s the point

first_imgPINEHURST, N.C. — Pinehurst No. 2 is anything but perfect for the U.S. Open, at least in the traditional sense of major championships in America. USGA executive director Mike Davis could not be any more thrilled. ”It’s awesome,” Davis said Monday as he gazed out at a golf course that looks like a yard that hasn’t been watered in a month. Sandy areas have replaced thick rough off the fairways. They are partially covered with that Pinehurst Resort officials refer to as ”natural vegetation,” but what most anyone else would simply call weeds. The edges of the bunkers are ragged. The turf is uneven just off some of the greens, with patches of no grass. Instead of verdant fairways from tee-to-green, the fairways are a blend of green, yellow and brown. Shortly after this Donald Ross gem was awarded its third U.S. Open in 15 years, the fabled No. 2 course went through a gutsy project to restore it to its natural look from yesteryear, before this notion that the condition of a course had to be perfect. Ernie Els, a two-time U.S. Open champion, was amazed when he walked off the 18th green. ”I wouldn’t call this an inland links, but it’s got that character,” he said. ”I was a bit nervous when I heard of the redo. But this looks like it’s been here for a long time.” Els has been playing the U.S. Open for two decades. He never imagined the ”toughest test in golf” without any rough. Nor does he think that will make it easier. ‘You don’t need it,” he said. ”When I played it in ’99, I didn’t like it. You hit it in the rough, you’re just trying to get it out. It was one-dimensional. Now, you’re going to have an unbelievable championship. ”If you miss the fairway, you’re not just going to wedge it out. You’ve got a chance to hit a miraculous shot. And then you could really be (in trouble). This is the way it used to be.” Els said the look of Pinehurst No. 2 reminded him of Royal Melbourne, and a guy who actually grew up next to Royal Melbourne agreed. ”These are Melbourne fairways,” Geoff Ogilvy said as he walked down the first fairway, where the grass was green for the first 200 yards before turning brown, and then going back to greener grass toward the green. ”This is kind of the way grass is supposed to be. In the summer it browns up, and in the winter it’s green. To my eye, this is what golf courses are supposed to look like.” Ogilvy understand architecture better than most players. He was looking at photos as Bill Coore and Ben Crenshaw worked on the restoration. He had heard stories. And it still managed to exceed his expectations. As for the idea of a U.S. Open without rough? He pointed to clumps of grass in the sandy areas, and some of the wiregrass bushes. And yes, the weeds. ”Look, the reality is there is rough there,” he said. ”It’s probably what rough used to be like before we had crazy irrigation.” The past two U.S. Open champions finished over par – Webb Simpson at Olympic Club, Justin Rose at Merion, both at 1-over. A third straight U.S. Open champion over par would be the longest streak in nearly 60 years. Not many were willing to bet against that. ”I’ve never played anything like it,” Jordan Spieth said. ”And it’s already – right now, with the pins in the middle of the greens – hard enough for even par to win. It’s going to be extremely challenging. But at the same time, it’s a great test.” More than a great test, Davis is hopeful it sends a great message. The USGA has been preaching in recent years to get away from the idea that golf courses have to be perfectly manicured to be great. Pinehurst No. 2, and perhaps Chambers Bay next year outside Seattle, allows a chance to show the golfing public what it means. The restoration project involved removing some 35 acres of sod and keeping only 450 of the 1,150 sprinkler heads. Water use is down an estimated 40 percent. ”It’s look back in the past, but it’s really looking forward to the future,” Davis said. ”Owners, operators and superintendents won’t give you this until the golfers think it’s OK. ”At private clubs, unless the greens committee says, ‘This is what we want,’ the superintendent won’t do it. It’s people thinking, ‘This looks fine.”’ Pinehurst No. 2 effectively presents the opposite perception of Augusta National. For years, superintendents have complained that too many courses wanted to be just like the home of the Masters in the quality – near perfection – of the conditions. ”Hopefully, this sets a precedent,” Ogilvy said. ”If Augusta has been the model everyone followed, hopefully this shows that it doesn’t have to be that way to be great.”last_img read more

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Ambulance Crash a Mystery

first_imgHALIFAX, Nova Scotia — RCMP in Nova Scotia hope to learn more about a deadly ambulance crash once the driver recovers from surgery. JEMS.com Editor’s Note: According to the April 2007 JEMS article “The Risky Side of Response,” approximately 60% of accidents analyzed in a study have occurred during emergent driving. Common factors included traveling through an intersection and striking another vehicle. Read “The Risky Side of Response” by David M. Williams, MS, Christine M. Zalar, MS. Click here to read story. The driver and a second paramedic were injured. Kim Linette Baker, 53, died Wednesday when the ambulance in which she was being transported rolled and crashed off Highway 103 near Hubbards.last_img

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Some of the Turpin children are playing the guitar to heal

first_imgPolice say they lived in squalor for years, malnourished and deprived of contact with the outside world. Their parents are accused of torturing them.Now on the road to recovery, David and Louise Turpin’s seven adult children are turning to music to help them heal.They’ve been learning to play the guitar and singing Tom Petty’s “Learning to Fly” and John Denver’s “Take Me Home, Country Roads” as a form of musical therapy, said Mark Uffer, the CEO of Corona Regional Medical Center, where the five women and two men have been recovering since they were taken from their parents’ home in January. The six minor children were taken to a separate hospital.Uffer said that all of the adult children “continue to be stable” and are making progress in their recovery. He declined to go into detail, citing privacy rules.—Scientific research supports theories that music is healing. “The studies show that music can create profound neurochemical and biological changes, tangible, demonstrable ones,” said psychologist Daniel Levitin, a professor emeritus at McGill University in Montreal, who specializes in neuroscience and music.“Those changes can in turn affect things like mood, even the healing of physical wounds and psychological wounds as well,” he said. Read the whole story: CNN More of our Members in the Media >last_img read more

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Vinkovci wants to preserve its monumental heritage with the help of a 3D scanner

first_imgLast year in January, a bronze memorial bust of Josip Runjanin from Vinkovci, the composer of the Croatian national anthem Lijepa naša, was stolen in Vinkovci, and despite a public invitation and an announced award, it has unfortunately not been found to this day. Due to the mentioned incident, the city authorities started thinking about how to protect the monumental heritage, and decided to scan the entire monumental heritage with the help of a 3D scanner so that replicas of the scanned monuments could be made in the future.”Despite the public invitation and the announced prize of 5.000 kuna, we did not find a memorial bust and we decided to make a new one. Unfortunately, due to advanced years, Antun Babić was not able to make a new memorial bust, so we offered this job to the academic sculptor Dejan Duraković.”, Said Vinkovci Mayor Mladen Karlić, adding that in considering how to protect monuments in public space from future possible alienation, there was a realization of the existence of 3D scanners in Vinkovci Association of Persons with Disabilities “Bubamara” Vinkovci.”We have a 3D scanner and part of the necessary equipment and it will be our pleasure to use it to preserve the monumental heritage in the City of Vinkovci”, Said the president of” Bubamara “Tomislav Velić.According to the head of culture and tourism of the City of Vinkovci, Mario Banožić, there are about 180 specimens of monumental heritage in the area of ​​the city of Vinkovci. “We estimated that the one who stole the bronze memorial bust of Josip Runjanin, which was placed on the square of the same name in 1971, could earn a maximum of 500 kuna by selling it in secondary raw materials, and making a new bust will cost us 50.000 kuna. Not to mention the huge cultural damage”, Said Banožić.A new memorial bust of Josip Runjanin was presented, which will be placed in place of the stolen one for the Day of the City of Vinkovci, July 20. When we talk about cultural tourism, it is certain that 3D scanner technology enables the preservation of monumental heritage for future generations that has been devastated or destroyed, either due to the theft or deterioration of cultural treasures. The original always has and will always have a much higher value than a replica, but if we already have to bit between a replica or nothing, then a replica is a much better option.Josip Runjanin (Vinkovci, 1821 – Novi Sad, 1878) was a Croatian composer and officer in the Austro-Hungarian army. He set Antun Mihanović’s song “Croatian Homeland” to music, which was proclaimed the Croatian anthem called “Our Beautiful Homeland”.Source: www.bubamara.hrlast_img read more

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Want to do something good for your health? Try being generous

first_imgShare Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Every day, we are confronted with choices about how to spend our money. Whether it’s thinking about picking up the tab at a group lunch or when a charity calls asking for a donation, we are faced with the decision to behave generously or not.Research suggests that spending money on others can improve happiness, but can it also improve your physical health?There is some evidence that donating time can improve physical health, but no one has looked at whether donating money has the same effect. LinkedIncenter_img So my colleagues and I at the University of British Columbia decided to conduct an experiment to find out if spending money on others could lower blood pressure, which will be published in the journal Health Psychology in December.Helpful people might be healthierA 1999 study examining whether volunteering had an effect on mortality provided initial evidence for an association between helping others and physical health. In the study, adults age 55 and older reported how many organizations they helped, how many hours they spent volunteering, and then underwent a physical exam.Researchers controlled for several factors, including how healthy participants were when the study began and their available social support. After five years the adults who reported providing more help to others were 44% more likely to be alive.In a more recent study, researchers measured blood pressure and volunteering once at baseline and again four years later. They found evidence that older adults who volunteered at least four hours per week in the 12 months prior to the baseline blood pressure measurement were less likely to develop high blood pressure four years later.Additional studies suggest that volunteering is associated with greater physical health in part because volunteering helps to buffer against stress and prevents against declines in functional health, such as declines in walking speed and physical strength.So does being helpful cause better health?It might seem simple – helping is good for your health. But so far, most research studying the health benefits of helping have been correlational. These studies cannot determine whether helping others actually causes improvements in physical health or just happens to be related to it.Also, most research has focused on the health benefits of volunteering one’s time. As it turns out, people think about time and money in vastly different ways. For example, whereas thinking about time leads people to prioritize social connections, thinking about money can lead people to distance themselves from others.It remains unclear whether the benefits of generosity extend to donating money. Our latest work provides the first empirical evidence that this decision might also have clinically relevant implications for physical health.Can spending money on others lower blood pressure?We gave 128 older adults (ages 65-85) US$40 a week for three weeks. Half of our participants were randomly assigned to spend the money on themselves and half were told to spend it on others. We told participants to spend their $40 payment all in one day and to save the receipts from the purchases they had made.We measured participants’ blood pressure before, during, and after they spent their study payments. We chose to examine blood pressure in this study because we can measure it reliably in the lab, and because high blood pressure is a significant health outcome – having chronically elevated blood pressure (hypertension) is responsible for 7.5 million premature deaths each year.What did we find? Among participants who were previously diagnosed with high blood pressure (N=73), spending money on others significantly reduced their blood pressure over the course of the study. Critically, the magnitude of these effects was comparable to the benefits of interventions such as anti-hypertensive medication and exercise.The participants who were previously diagnosed with high blood pressure, and who were assigned to spend money on themselves, showed no change in blood pressure during the study. As expected, for people who didn’t have high blood pressure, there was no benefit from spending money on others.Whom you spend money on mattersInterestingly, we found tentative evidence that how people spent their money mattered for promoting the benefits of financial generosity. People seemed to benefit most from spending money on others they felt closest to. This finding is consistent with previous research from our lab showing that people derive the most satisfaction from spending money on others when they splurge on close friends and family.For instance, the first participant in our study was a war veteran. He donated his payments to a school built in honor of a friend he had served with in the Vietnam War. Another participant donated her payments to a charity that had helped her granddaughter survive anorexia.Of course, there is still a lot to learn about when and for whom the health benefits of financial generosity emerge.For example, we don’t know a lot about how or how much people should spend on others to enjoy long-lasting health benefits. Indeed, research suggests that the positive benefits of new circumstances can disappear quickly. Thus, to sustain the health benefits of financial generosity, it might be necessary to engage in novel acts of financial generosity, while prioritizing people that you are closest to.And financial generosity might not always benefit health. Drawing from research on caregiving, financial generosity might provide benefits only when it does not incur overwhelming personal costs. After reading this article, you probably should think twice before donating your entire life savings to charity, because the stress of helping so extensively could undermine any potential benefits.Although more research is needed to replicate these results, our initial findings provide some of the strongest evidence to date that daily decisions related to engaging in financial generosity can have causal benefits for physical health.Stepping toward better health (and happiness) may be as simple as spending your next $20 generously.By Ashley Whillans, PhD student in Social & Health Psychology, University of British ColumbiaThis article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. Email Pinterestlast_img read more

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CYL-TEC announce expansion

first_imgGet instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270. Subscribelast_img

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Steel Sensations…The sky is falling!

first_imgPittsburgh Steelers quarterback Landry Jones (3) throws a pass during the first half of an NFL preseason football game against the Philadelphia Eagles in Pittsburgh, on Thursday, Aug. 18, 2016. (AP Photo/Don Wright)The Sky is falling, the Sky is falling!  That’s what many in Pittsburgh seem to be crying out after the Steelers have dropped their first two pre-season games.  Yes….Pre-season games.  The games that mean all of nothing, zip, zilch, nada mixed in with a big dose of who cares?Calm down Pittsburgh. Seriously.  The outrage I’ve seen surrounding the 0-2 start is amazing to me. Especially the shear anger and disdain towards Steelers backup quarterback Landry Jones.I get it, he threw four picks in one half against the Eagles….in the pre-season.  Those four picks mean, nothing, zip, zilch, nada and who cares?  Why the anger? Why the clamoring for the Steelers to go sign or trade for a different backup?Do you really expect Jones to be Big Ben?  C’mon Pittsburgh, you know better.  Do you really expect Jones to even be himself when Tomlin, rightfully so, isn’t playing Antonio Brown, LeVeon Bell, DeAngelo Williams and LaDarius Green (due to injury for Green)?  You expect success?You think there is a better available backup?  Who?  You think they should trade an asset to grab a guy who might start a couple of games if Ben gets hurt?  C’mon Pittsburgh, where is your football IQ on this one?  You KNOW better.The Steelers believe in Jones as a 2nd QB and so do I. He proved last year he has what it takes to be a BACKUP in the league, a guy called on in emergency duty. Stop expecting Ben, who’s one of the best in the business, it’s not fair to compare Jones to that.Furthermore, chill out on the pre-season losses guys.  Did I mention the guys who are NOT playing? Ben isn’t playing either by the way, because the games mean nothing, zip, zilch, well you get the idea.Mike Pelaia hosts the website Steel Nation Association http://www.steelnationassociation.com– Covering the Steelers and helping Children’s Hospital All Day Everyday. You can e-mail him at [email protected]last_img read more

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