CU-Boulder Alumni Association To Present Highest Honors On May 8

first_imgShare Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mail Published: March 19, 2001 The CU-Boulder Alumni Association will present eight members of the university community with its highest honors during the 71st annual Alumni Awards on May 8. The awards ceremony will be held at 7 p.m. in Old Main and is free and open to the public. The 2001 George Norlin Award honoring distinguished alumni for lifetime achievement and a devotion to the betterment of society will be presented to John Farrington. The physician, who has bachelor’s and medical degrees from CU, served his native Boulder for more than 50 years as a compassionate and committed internist and was instrumental in the growth of Boulder Community Hospital. Three faculty and staff members will receive Robert Stearns Awards for extraordinary achievement and service to the university:o Jean Delaney, an alumna who has demonstrated superb leadership and management skills, has served on the CU-Boulder staff for 28 years as director of the Office of International Education, vice chancellor of student affairs and currently manages a program to improve student services.o Dennis Jackson, a member of the music faculty since 1971, is a highly respected voice teacher who has trained world-renowned singers and thousands of other CU students in opera and lyric theater. He also has taught the love of music to alumni and children through various outreach programs he has created.o Richard Jessor, a CU faculty member with the Institute of Behavioral Science for 50 years, has garnered an international reputation for his sophisticated, groundbreaking research in problem behavior theory, notably in alcohol and drug abuse. His colleagues consider him a role model as an exemplary faculty member. Bruce Benson of Denver and Jeanne Manning of Boulder will receive Alumni Recognition Awards for their service to CU. Benson is a significant donor to the university and chairs CU’s current fund-raising campaign. Manning has volunteered for CU since 1964, notably with the Graduate School Advisory Council and the Center for the Humanities and the Arts. State Rep. Gayle Berry of Grand Junction will receive the 2001 Legislative Recognition Award for her efforts on behalf of higher education in Colorado as a member of the Joint Budget Committee. Steve Taniguchi of Boulder will earn the Board of Directors Award for his eight years of dedicated service to the Alumni Association as a board member and chair of the board from 1997 to 1999. For reservations to the awards ceremony please contact Nancy Rasmussen at (303) 492-2722 or 1-800-492-7743 or e-mail [email protected]last_img read more

Continue reading

CYL-TEC announce expansion

first_imgGet instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270. Subscribelast_img

Continue reading

Intercargo calls for urgent action for seafarer crisis

first_imgIntercargo said that due to the Covid-19 pandemic approximately 300,000 seafarers remain trapped on board their ships, with 35 to 40 percent of all seafarers serving beyond their Seafarer Employment Agreement (SEA) contracts – some working up to 17 months on board.The association explained that whilst it supports the International Maritime Summit on crew changes that saw 13 countries sign agreements to facilitate the changes, the safety of crew, ships and cargoes will be compromised if progress is not made soon.Dimitris Fafalios, chairman of Intercargo said: “The situation is reaching farcical proportions. We have seen crew changes refused because a Covid test could not be carried out within the prescribed 48-hour window before the crew’s arrival, despite the journey to the port taking three days.“The two key bottlenecks are the airlines unwillingness to make flights available between shipping destinations and crew source countries; and the lack of commitment from health and immigration authorities to facilitate seafarers travelling and issuance of visas.”Jay Pillai, vice chairman of Intercargo added that the International Maritime Organization’s (IMO) protocol for key worker classification is not being honoured by all port states: “This is inhumane and countries should bear full responsibility for it. Some governments are not facilitating the crew change even for their own citizens.“More and more countries are prohibiting crew changes, though they welcome the cargoes the ships bring to support the welfare of their society.”Intercargo said that attention should focus on measures such as accurate and diligent testing. Seafarers should be tested prior to departure from their home country and tested again at arrival to port prior to going on board ship. Similarly, seafarers disembarking from ships shall be tested prior to coming ashore or flying out. If tests are negative, they shall be exonerated from quarantine. Moreover, port states should allow seafarers to sign off without confirmed flight tickets and wait in isolation hotels.Intercargo also urged the airline industry “not to forget seafarers during these difficult times”.Seafarer, superintendent, specialist technician and surveyor travel to and from ships before the Covid-19 crisis was a huge source of revenue to airlines, with hundreds of thousands of tickets purchased annually.www.intercargo.orglast_img read more

Continue reading