Massive investment so far suggests BCs LNG industry no pipe dream minister

by The Canadian Press Posted Oct 7, 2013 12:55 pm MDT VANCOUVER – British Columbia’s minister of natural gas development says a commitment by a Malaysian national company to build a liquefied natural gas plant in B.C. and investment by other countries suggests the province isn’t chasing an LNG pipe dream.“I think we actually have the major players in liquefied natural gas here,” Rich Coleman said. “There’s at least 10 of them here with significant opportunity to want to make some investment.”Coleman will leave Friday for Malaysia, South Korea and China to promote what he calls B.C.’s competitive advantage when it comes to the LNG industry.“South Korea, for instance, is a major consumer of energy, and the second-largest importer of liquefied natural gas in the world,” he told a news conference Monday.Coleman said B.C.’s abundant natural gas supply could provide Asia’s needs for 84 years through several proposed plants in a province where the temperate climate means making LNG takes less energy.He said the province has signed pipeline agreements with many First Nations to create a stable environment for the proposed industry, which Premier Christy Clark has said will be the cleanest in the world despite criticism about pollution from LNG operations.While the government is pushing the development of three LNG plants in northern B.C. by 2020 as a massive economic opportunity, the province is not neglecting other sectors, Coleman said.He said eight new mines are being opened and nine others are being expanded by 2015 while the province proceeds with the Site C Hydro project to ensure long-term clean power, Coleman said. That facility is currently undergoing a two-year environmental assessment process.On Sunday, Prime Minister Stephen Harper received news in Malayasia that the country’s state-owned oil and gas company Petronas will invest $36 billion in B.C. on an LNG plant and the pipeline to transport the gas.“The company still has to make its final investment decision but they have optioned property up in Prince Rupert, they’ve been doing their geotechnical test on the land to determine the feasibility of their plant and where they would put it,” Coleman said.He said the province has been negotiating a tax regime for LNG and could make an announcement in November.“We’re going to have to lock it down with some complex legislation to make sure people know that there’s certainty around their investment in British Columbia so somebody can’t just come in and arbitrarily change it after you’ve made billions of dollars of investment, which has happened in some jurisdictions around the world.”The companies involved have promised to deliver the cleanest energy anywhere, Coleman said.“There is some fair argument around the fact that if we send natural gas to Asia, particularly China, if we replace coal and fix their greenhouse gas emissions down that we as a jurisdiction for the resource should get some credit worldwide.”British Columbia currently has more than 10 proposed LNG projects, and three of them have approved export licences from the National Energy Board.Clark has said B.C.’s opportunity to export LNG to Asia could pump $1 trillion into the province’s economy by 2046 and potentially create 100,000 jobs.She is heading to China, Japan and Korea as part of a jobs and trade mission that will further promote liquefied natural gas development to possible investors. Massive investment so far suggests B.C.’s LNG industry no pipe dream: minister AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email read more

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Flu pressures on intensive care units now as bad as at height

These figures are far lower than the same week last year, when there were 53.1 per 100,000 in England, but health officials said that younger people were less likely to go to the GP about flu.Throughout the last week, there were 237 admissions to intensive care or high dependency units for flu. This compares with 198 cases this time last year, with the same rate of 0.5 per 100,000 people seen in both years.Richard Pebody, head of flu at PHE, said: “We are currently seeing mainly A(H1N1)pdm09 circulating, which is well matched to the strains in this year’s flu vaccines.”Previous flu seasons suggest this strain particularly affects children, pregnant women, and adults with long-term conditions – so if you’re eligible, it’s not too late to get your free jab to protect yourself and vulnerable people around you.”Last month PHE officials pleaded with these groups to come forward for jabs.The failure of last year’s jabs fuelled the highest winter death toll for more than 40 years.This year, new types of vaccines are being offered, but the scramble to get hold of stocks meant GPs were asked to delay offering the jabs to some patients. Flu pressures on intensive care are as bad now as at the height of last year’s winter crisis, amid warnings that it may be linked to too few young people failing to have their jabs. ​A report from Public Health England reveals that levels of influenza are now having a high impact on intensive care and high-dependency units, amid rises in flu across the country.–– ADVERTISEMENT ––In the last fortnight, the number of cases seen by GPs has more than doubled.But a far greater impact has been seen in hospital intensive care units, with just as many cases as seen this time last year – when the NHS had the worst winter crisis on record.Last year winter deaths hit a 42-year high, after the flu jab failed to work in the vast majority of cases.Officials say this year’s vaccination is a good match – but warn that too few people are taking it.They say the pressures on intensive care units may be fuelled by low take-up of the jabs among pregnant women, and adults below the age of 65 with long-term conditions.These groups are particularly susceptible to the main strain in circulation – A (H1N1), also known as swine flu – which pensioners are more likely to have built immunity to.And they are also at increased risk of more severe consequences of the condition, experts warned.Just 43.6 per cent of pregnant women have had the jab so far this year, compared with 46 per cent this time last year. And only 44.7 per cent of adults with a chronic health condition have had the jab, compared with 47.5 per cent this time last year.The data shows that GP consultations for flu-like illness rose from 8.4 per 100,000 at the start of the year to 19.2 per 100,000 people in the last week. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. read more

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